Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Some text before the code so that the question summary isn't mangled.

class Tree
{
    public event EventHandler MadeSound;

    public void Fall() { MadeSound(this, new EventArgs()); }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
    	Tree oaky = new Tree();
    	oaky.Fall();
    }
}

I haven't used events much in C#, but the fact that this would cause a NullRefEx seems weird. The EventHandler reference is considered null because it currently has no subsribers - but that doesn't mean that the event hasn't occurred, does it?

EventHandlers are differentiated from standard delegates by the event keyword. Why didn't the language designers set them up to fire silently in to the void when they have no subscribers? (I gather you can do this manually by explicitly adding an empty delegate).

share|improve this question
1  
Awesome example! –  David Thibault Oct 16 '08 at 17:01
    
Also +1 for the example. I guess calling Fall in a lonesome forest won't fire MadeSound. –  OregonGhost Oct 16 '08 at 17:03
    
when a tree falls in the forest and no one is listening, is does still make a sound - it says "Moo" –  Steven A. Lowe Oct 16 '08 at 17:22
    
I posted an example below using an extension method which I believe achieves what you want -- isolating all the null checks in one location. –  Taylor Leese Aug 6 '09 at 0:47

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to understand what your event declaration is actually doing. It's declaring both an event and a variable, When you refer to it within the class, you're just referring to the variable, which will be null when there are no subscribers.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think it's just referring to the variable, since C# won't allow a class one to manipulate its events in the way it manipulates variables. For example, C# will allow "someEvent += someDeletate;", but I don't think it will allow "someEvent = someEvent + someDelegate;". Given that, I am puzzled by why using an event in a fashion syntactically similar to invoking a delegate isn't coded as "grab delegate, and invoke if not null". On the other hand, if I had my druthers, events would use a different mechanism from multicast delegates anyway. –  supercat Aug 12 '11 at 23:49
    
@supercat a c# event is just a delegate with the event keyword. This offers the special access restrictions that you described but it is just a class. –  Gusdor May 8 at 8:18
    
@Gusdor: No, it's not not "just a delegate" any more than a property is "just a field". An event is a pair of methods, effectively: one for subscribe and one for unsubscribe. In what way is that "just a class"? –  Jon Skeet May 8 at 11:58
    
@JonSkeet: Do you have any idea why C# didn't make event-invocation syntax interpret a null event as a no-op, given that a null event delegate is a legitimate expected situation? Requiring that programmers write {var handler=SomethingHappened; if (handler!=null) handler(this,e);} or the shorter-but-wrong if (somethingHappened!=null) somethinghappened(this,e); doesn't seem very helpful. –  supercat May 10 at 16:05
    
@supercat: Do you mean any delegate invocation? You wouldn't want to restrict it to just field-like events, surely? But either way, no, I don't know why C# was designed that way. I suspect it might be done differently if they were starting from scratch. –  Jon Skeet May 10 at 16:15

Well, the canonical form is:

void OnMadeSound()
{
    if (MadeSound != null)
    {
        MadeSound(this, new EventArgs());
    }
}

public void Fall() {  OnMadeSound(); }

which is very slightly faster that calling an empty delegate, so speed won out over programming convenience.

share|improve this answer
    
I think it's recommended that the On* method is protected to allow a derived class to react to the event or to change how or when the event is called. Just as an addition. –  OregonGhost Oct 16 '08 at 17:03
    
Actually, the safest form is this: protected void OnMadeSound() { EventHandler tempHandler = MadeSound; if (tempHandler != null) { tempHandler(this, new EventArgs()); } } –  Scott Dorman Oct 16 '08 at 17:21
    
The method should be protected and the tempHandler prevents the possibility that a NullReferenceException occurs if the handler is deleted between the null check and actually raising the event. –  Scott Dorman Oct 16 '08 at 17:21

Another good way I've seen to get around this, without having to remember to check for null:

class Tree
{
    public event EventHandler MadeSound = delegate {};

    public void Fall() { MadeSound(this, new EventArgs()); }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Tree oaky = new Tree();
        oaky.Fall();
    }
}

Note the anonymous delegate - probably a slight performance hit, so you have to figure out which method (check for null, or empty delegate) works best in your situation.

share|improve this answer
    
your code can still set the event MadeSound to null, so you can still get a NullReferenceException, making the delegate{} pointless –  Robert Paulson Oct 16 '08 at 23:58
    
Or, instead of setting it to null, you could set it to delegate {}... How often do you set an event to null? I haven't ever had to yet. –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 17 '08 at 11:31

The recommended pattern is (.net 2.0+)

public class MyClass
{
    public event EventHandler<EventArgs> MyEvent; // the event

    // protected to allow subclasses to override what happens when event raised.
    protected virtual void OnMyEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // prevent race condition by copying reference locally
        EventHandler<EventArgs> localHandler = MyEvent;
        if (localHandler != null)
        {
            localHandler(sender, e);
        }
    }
    public void SomethingThatGeneratesEvent()
    {
        OnMyEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}

I see a lot of recommendations for an empty delegate{} in an initializer, but I totally disagree with it. If you follow the above pattern you only check the event != null in one place. The empty delegate{} initializer is a waste because it's an extra call per event, it wastes memory, and it still can fail if MyEvent was set to null elsewhere in my class.

* If your class is sealed, you wouldn't make OnMyEvent() virtual.

share|improve this answer

Very Zen, eh?

You have to test for null when you want to raise an event:

protected void OnMyEvent()
{
    if (this.MyEvent != null) this.MyEvent(this, EventArgs.Empty);
}

It would be nice if you didn't have to bother with this, but them's the breaks.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, EventArgs.Empty :) –  xyz Oct 16 '08 at 18:23

James provided a good technical reasoning, I would also like to add that I have seen people use this an advantage, if no subscribers are listening to an event, they will take action to log it in the code or something similar. A simpl example, but fitting in this context.

share|improve this answer

What is the point of raising an event if no one is listening? Technically, its just how C# chose to implement it.

In C#, an event is a delegate with some special feathers. A delegate in this case can be viewed as a linked list of function pointers (to handler methods of subscribers). When you 'fire the event' each function pointer is invoked in turn. Initially the delegate is a null object like anything else. When you do a += for the first subscribe action, Delegate.Combine is called which instantiates the list. (Calling null.Invoke() throws the null exception - when the event is fired.)

If you still feel that "it must not be", use a helper class EventsHelper as mentioned here with old and improved 'defensive event publishing' http://weblogs.asp.net/rosherove/articles/DefensiveEventPublishing.aspx

share|improve this answer

Using an extension method would be helpful in this scenario.

public static class EventExtension
{
    public static void RaiseEvent<T>(this EventHandler<T> handler, object obj, T args) where T : EventArgs
    {
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(obj, args);
        }
    }
}

It can then be used like below.

public event EventHandler<YourEventArgs> YourEvent;
...
YourEvent.RaiseEvent(this, new YourEventArgs());
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I actually came to that approach myself and made one for plain old EventArgs, too :) –  xyz Aug 6 '09 at 9:52

Thank you for the responses. I do understand why the NullReferenceException happens and how to get around it.

Gishu said

What is the point of raising an event if no one is listening?

Well, maybe it's a terminology thing. The appeal of an "event" system seems to me that all the responsibility of the fallout of the event that took place should be on the watchers and not the performer.


Perhaps a better thing to ask is: If a delegate field is declared with the event keyword in front of it, why doesn't the compiler translate all instances of:

MadeSound(this, EventArgs.Empty)

to

if (MadeSound != null) { MadeSound(this, EventArgs.Empty); }

behind the scenes in the same manner that other syntax shortcuts are? The number of boilerplate OnSomeEvent null checking methods that people have to write manually must be colossal.

share|improve this answer
    
The compiler's isolating what it's doing here into a single aspect - creating a variable and an event with the same name. I'd rather it didn't do more than that, for the sake of complexity. Avoiding the null checking is easy though: public event EventHandler Click = delegate{}; –  Jon Skeet Oct 16 '08 at 19:48
    
So from outside the class, MadeSound refers to an "event", which manages adding/removing suitable delegates to an instance of the EventHandler delegate that shares the same identifier and hides the "event" internally? Meaning the event isn't directly fired, but rather the delegate list it produced? –  xyz Oct 16 '08 at 22:15
    
@Jon I disagree. I have a lot of respect for you but fail to see why you'd advocate the delegate{} initializer pattern. –  Robert Paulson Oct 17 '08 at 0:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.