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I'm a beginner of fortran and Linux.I ran a simple fortran program named demo.f90 on Linux. Then an error occurred, as follow.

/tmp/cckAhxOW.o: In function `MAIN__':
demo.f90:(.text+0x25): undefined reference to `qsort_'

The code is attached below.

program trand

external compar

integer*2 compar

INTEGER*4 array(10)/5,1,9,0,8,7,3,4,6,2/,l/10/,isize/4/

call qsort( array, l, isize, compar )

write(*,'(10i3)') array

end program trand

integer*2 function compar( a, b )

INTEGER*4 a, b

if ( a .lt. b ) compar = -1

if ( a .eq. b ) compar = 0

if ( a .gt. b ) compar = 1

return

end function compar

Thanks for your help:)

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You didn't link the program with the library containing qsort –  stark Jan 6 at 1:33
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You would do better to put compare into a module and use it. This approach will allow the compiler to check for consistency between your call of the subroutine and its declaration. If the main program and the module are in the same file, put the module first.

module MySubs

contains

integer*2 function compar( a, b )
...
end function compar

end module MySubs

program trand

use MySubs
use SomeMod

....

end program trand

Where SomeMod is a module in another file SomeMod.f90 with the sorting routine qsort. Then compile and link:

gfortran SomeMod.f90 trand.f90

or whatever compiler and filenames you are using. The file with qsort needs to be before the file with program trand.

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I do not believe alone this will help. See my answer. –  Vladimir F Jan 6 at 8:24
    
I was assuming that the person asking the question had Fortran source code for a qsort. If not, this is not a beginner problem. –  M. S. B. Jan 6 at 8:36
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qsort is not a built-in subroutine (a.k.a. intrinsic subroutine).

You need to tell the program where to find it, for instance by loading a module which contains this subroutine (see the use keyword).

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Try including "libfui.a" library

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Thanks.Would you please show me how to include this library? –  user3163883 Jan 6 at 2:20
    
@user3163883 how are you building? –  Digital_Reality Jan 6 at 2:21
    
@user3163883 you can take a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/9865015/… –  Digital_Reality Jan 6 at 2:22
    
gfortran demo.f90 -o demo –  user3163883 Jan 6 at 2:30
    
@user3163883 try something like this stackoverflow.com/a/1306892/2648826 –  Digital_Reality Jan 6 at 2:34
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qsort is actualy a C standard library function. You have to declare an interface to it. It goes like this:

module Sort
  use iso_c_binding

  implicit none

  interface
    subroutine qsort(array,elem_count,elem_size,compare) bind(C,name="qsort")
      import
      type(c_ptr),value       :: array
      integer(c_size_t),value :: elem_count
      integer(c_size_t),value :: elem_size
      type(c_funptr),value    :: compare !int(*compare)(const void *, const void *)
    end subroutine qsort !standard C library qsort
  end interface
end module Sort


program trand

use Sort

external compar

integer(c_int) compar

integer(c_int),target :: array(10) = [5,1,9,0,8,7,3,4,6,2]
integer(c_size_t) l/10/,isize/4/

call qsort( c_loc(array(1)), l, isize, c_funloc(compar) )

write(*,'(10i3)') array

end program trand

integer(c_int) function compar( a, b ) bind(C)
use iso_c_binding

integer(c_int) a, b

if ( a .lt. b ) compar = -1

if ( a .eq. b ) compar = 0

if ( a .gt. b ) compar = 1

end function compar

Then just compile as you did. Tested succesfully with gfortran 4.8.

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