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I have some data I need to store somewhere after a user logs in, what I need are:

1. A list of customers
2. US States list

for now that's all. Now Customer's list can continue to grow constantly and even after it has been loaded, obviously US States don't.

Currently what I do in my login.aspx page after the user logs in and everything is validated then I go to my SQL database and load all customers and US states into a Session variable. Right now this works although it does take a little bit of time but since there's only about 3 users at any time testing the site it doesn't affect. But as I understand this could be a problem when the company of about 50+ users start using it or even customers aswell.. So what would be the best way to work this and why? Thanks in advance.

ps. if this is not a valid question, please let me know and I'll take it down, I just didn't know where to ask this and get some useful feedback.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Andres,

Is it possible to (instead of using session) to cache the data. This can be done in multiple ways through various caching techniques (IE System.Web.Caching, MemoryCahce).

As your users grow \ shrink you can modify the DB and the cached instance at the same time. When the user requests the list of users (states) the cached list is evaluated. If the cached list isnt set then you re-build the cache list.

You could do something like. (Basic example)

public class UserCache : IEnumerable<User>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// const cache string
    /// </summary>
    const string userCacheString = "_userCacheList";

    /// <summary>
    /// current list of users
    /// </summary>
    public static UserCache Current
    {
        get
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current == null)
                throw new Exception("NO CONTEXT");
            var userList = HttpContext.Current.Cache[userCacheString] as UserCache;
            if (userList == null)
            {
                userList = new UserCache();
                HttpContext.Current.Cache[userCacheString] = new UserCache();
            }
            return userList;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// default constructor
    /// </summary>
    public UserCache()
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// the list of users
    /// </summary>
    List<User> users;

    /// <summary>
    /// adds a user
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="user"></param>
    public void Add(User user)
    {
        if (this.Contains(user))
            return;
        this.users.Add(user);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// removes a user
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="user"></param>
    public void Remove(User user)
    {
        if (this.Contains(user))
            return;
        this.users.Remove(user);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// clears a user
    /// </summary>
    public void Clear()
    {
        this.users = null;
    }



    /// <summary>
    /// fills the users from the database
    /// </summary>
    void fillUsers()
    {
        this.users = new List<User>();
        //TODO: Get from DB
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// gets the enumerator
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public IEnumerator<User> GetEnumerator()
    {
        if (this.users == null)
            fillUsers();
        foreach (var user in users)
            yield return user;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// gets the enumerator
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

public class User
{
    public string UserName { get; set; }

    public Guid UserID { get; set; }

    public string Email { get; set; }
}

From here you user management (where you add \ remove users) can call the UserCache to modify its collection accordinly. Such as (psudo code)

public class UserManager
{
    public void Register(string userName, string email)
    {
        //TODO: Register in DB.
        UserCache.Current.Add(new User
        {
            UserID = Guid.NewGuid(),
            Email = email,
            UserName = userName
        });
    }
}

From here you can always call UserCache.Current to get the current user list.

Just a thought.

EDIT: Response to Simon Halsey comment.

In the example I did inherit from the IEnumerable<> interface and not the List<> interface. This was a personal preference and to support "how" the class was defined. Now before I explain, this is not the only way but just a conceptual way of achieving the result.

In the example the method Clear() clears the inner list by setting the inner list user to null. In the IEnumerable<> implentation GetEnumerator() method the first check is if the inner list is null. If the inner list is null then the fillUsers() method is called to retrieve all users from the database.

If this example inherited from List<> then the Clear() method of List<> would be called and clears the list (removing all items) however the list is not null. Therefore enumerating the list after the Clear() method has been called will result in no users. Now this could be re-written using a List<> implentation as follows. Where the only thing you will have to do is override the Clear() method and the constructor to load the users. Such as.

public class UserListCache : List<User>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// const cache string
    /// </summary>
    const string userCacheString = "_userCacheList";

    /// <summary>
    /// current list of users
    /// </summary>
    public static UserListCache Current
    {
        get
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current == null)
                throw new Exception("NO CONTEXT");
            var userList = HttpContext.Current.Cache[userCacheString] as UserListCache;
            if (userList == null)
            {
                userList = new UserListCache();
                HttpContext.Current.Cache[userCacheString] = new UserListCache();
            }
            return userList;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// default constructor
    /// </summary>
    public UserListCache()
    {
        this.fillUsers();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// clear the list
    /// </summary>
    public new void Clear()
    {
        base.Clear();
        this.fillUsers();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// fills the users from the database
    /// </summary>
    void fillUsers()
    {
        //TODO: Get from DB
    }
}

Now neither method is better than the other (and the solution may not be adequate).

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting you inherited from IEnumerable<>. Would have been better to inherit from List<> & not need to write all those methods. Also, rather than just setting the value in the cache, the insert method would give you greater control, like cache priority, timeout, etc. –  Simon Halsey Jan 6 at 3:10
    
@SimonHalsey intersting comments. I have posted an edit as to why I used IEnumerable<> and (what I think) should be done when inheriting from List<> –  Nico Jan 6 at 3:25
    
thanks! question, now should this be done after logging in, or is there somewhere else (recommended) that the info can load for the first time so the login doesn't get slowed down from loading all this info. –  Andres Jan 6 at 13:36
    
It depends on how often you use it. With what @Nico has done, you would just call a method. The class above will pull the data from the db if it's the first time, otherwise use the cache. Your code doesn't need to worry about it. If it's data that's used a lot, or takes time to load, then caching them at startup would be good, at the possible expensive of a larger memory footprint. –  Simon Halsey Jan 6 at 14:22

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