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Is there a LINQ way to swap the position of two items inside a list<T>?

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24  
Why does it matter why he wants to do this. People who are googling for "swap list items c#" are going to want a straight answer to this specific question. –  Daniel Macias May 24 '12 at 0:36
    
@DanielMacias This is so true. These answers that are like 'but why are you doing this?' are so annoying. I think that one should provide at least a viable answer before trying to argue the whys. –  julealgon Feb 11 at 15:48
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4 Answers

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Check the answer from Marc from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/552731/c-good-best-implementation-of-swap-method.

static void Swap(IList<int> list, int indexA, int indexB)
{
    int tmp = list[indexA];
    list[indexA] = list[indexB];
    list[indexB] = tmp;
}

which can be linq-i-fied like

static IList<T> Swap<T>(this IList<T> list, int indexA, int indexB)
{
    T tmp = list[indexA];
    list[indexA] = list[indexB];
    list[indexB] = tmp;
    return list;
}

var lst = new List<int>() { 8, 3, 2, 4 };
lst = lst.Swap(1, 2);
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Downvote reason? –  Jan Jongboom Jan 19 '10 at 14:57
8  
This is not LINQified. –  Jason Jan 19 '10 at 16:37
2  
Why does this extension method need to return a list? You're modifying the list in-place. –  vargonian Apr 6 '12 at 7:03
5  
Then you can chain the methods. –  Jan Jongboom Apr 7 '12 at 15:12
    
"Genericized" perhaps? –  Rhys van der Waerden May 16 '13 at 4:04
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Maybe someone will think of a clever way to do this, but you shouldn't. Swapping two items in a list is inherently side-effect laden but LINQ operations should be side-effect free. Thus, just use a simple extension method:

static class IListExtensions {
    public static void Swap<T>(
        this IList<T> list,
        int firstIndex,
        int secondIndex
    ) {
        Contract.Requires(list != null);
        Contract.Requires(firstIndex >= 0 && firstIndex < list.Count);
        Contract.Requires(secondIndex >= 0 && secondIndex < list.Count);
        if (firstIndex == secondIndex) {
            return;
        }
        T temp = list[firstIndex];
        list[firstIndex] = list[secondIndex];
        list[secondIndex] = temp;
    }
}
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Side effects? Can you elaborate? –  Tony The Lion Jan 19 '10 at 14:54
    
+1 for argument checking and an extension method –  plinth Jan 19 '10 at 15:02
6  
By Side Effects he mean they alter the list and possibly the items in the list - as opposed to just querying data which would not modify anything –  saret Jan 19 '10 at 15:04
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There is no existing Swap-method, so you have to create one yourself. Of course you can linqify it, but that has to be done with one (unwritten?) rules in mind: LINQ-operations do not change the input parameters!

In the other "linqify" answers, the (input) list is modified and returned, but this action brakes that rule. If would be weird if you have a list with unsorted items, do a LINQ "OrderBy"-operation and than discover that the input list is also sorted (just like the result). This is not allowed to happen!

So... how do we do this?

My first thought was just to restore the collection after it was finished iterating. But this is a dirty solution, so do not use it:

static public IEnumerable<T> Swap1<T>(this IList<T> source, int index1, int index2)
{
    // Parameter checking is skipped in this example.

    // Swap the items.
    T temp = source[index1];
    source[index1] = source[index2];
    source[index2] = temp;

    // Return the items in the new order.
    foreach (T item in source)
        yield return item;

    // Restore the collection.
    source[index2] = source[index1];
    source[index1] = temp;
}

This solution is dirty because it does modify the input list, even if it restores it to the original state. This could cause several problems:

  1. The list could be readonly which will throw an exception.
  2. If the list is shared by multiple threads, the list will change for the other threads during the duration of this function.
  3. If an exception occurs during the iteration, the list will not be restored. (This could be resolved to write an try-finally inside the Swap-function, and put the restore-code inside the finally-block).

There is a better (and shorter) solution: just make a copy of the original list. (This also makes it possible to use an IEnumerable as a parameter, instead of an IList):

static public IEnumerable<T> Swap2<T>(this IList<T> source, int index1, int index2)
{
    // Parameter checking is skipped in this example.

    // If nothing needs to be swapped, just return the original collection.
    if (index1 == index2)
        return source;

    // Make a copy.
    List<T> copy = source.ToList();

    // Swap the items.
    T temp = copy[index1];
    copy[index1] = copy[index2];
    copy[index2] = temp;

    // Return the copy with the swapped items.
    return copy;
}

One disadvantage of this solution is that it copies the entire list which will consume memory and that makes the solution rather slow.

You might consider the following solution:

static public IEnumerable<T> Swap3<T>(this IList<T> source, int index1, int index2)
{
    // Parameter checking is skipped in this example.
    // It is assumed that index1 < index2. Otherwise a check should be build in and both indexes should be swapped.

    using (IEnumerator<T> e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        // Iterate to the first index.
        for (int i = 0; i < index1; i++)
            yield return source[i];

        // Return the item at the second index.
        yield return source[index2];

        if (index1 != index2)
        {
            // Return the items between the first and second index.
            for (int i = index1 + 1; i < index2; i++)
                yield return source[i];

            // Return the item at the first index.
            yield return source[index1];
        }

        // Return the remaining items.
        for (int i = index2 + 1; i < source.Count; i++)
            yield return source[i];
    }
}

And if you want to input parameter to be IEnumerable:

static public IEnumerable<T> Swap4<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int index1, int index2)
{
    // Parameter checking is skipped in this example.
    // It is assumed that index1 < index2. Otherwise a check should be build in and both indexes should be swapped.

    using(IEnumerator<T> e = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        // Iterate to the first index.
        for(int i = 0; i < index1; i++) 
        {
            if (!e.MoveNext())
                yield break;
            yield return e.Current;
        }

        if (index1 != index2)
        {
            // Remember the item at the first position.
            if (!e.MoveNext())
                yield break;
            T rememberedItem = e.Current;

            // Store the items between the first and second index in a temporary list. 
            List<T> subset = new List<T>(index2 - index1 - 1);
            for (int i = index1 + 1; i < index2; i++)
            {
                if (!e.MoveNext())
                    break;
                subset.Add(e.Current);
            }

            // Return the item at the second index.
            if (e.MoveNext())
                yield return e.Current;

            // Return the items in the subset.
            foreach (T item in subset)
                yield return item;

            // Return the first (remembered) item.
            yield return rememberedItem;
        }

        // Return the remaining items in the list.
        while (e.MoveNext())
            yield return e.Current;
    }
}

Swap4 also makes a copy of (a subset of) the source. So worst case scenario, it is as slow and memory consuming as function Swap2.

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If order matters, you should keep a property on the "T" objects in your list that denotes sequence. In order to swap them, just swap the value of that property, and then use that in the .Sort(comparison with sequence property)

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That's if you can conceptually agree that your T has an inherent "order", but not if you want it to be sorted in an arbitrary fashion without inherent "order", such as in a UI. –  Dave Van den Eynde Jan 30 '10 at 14:15
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