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When I see the answer to solve Level 15 of http://escape.alf.nu, I notice that <!--<script> will cause the DOM parser to break. In the following HTML you won't see the string "Test" (tested on IE 11 & Firefox & Chrome):

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
    <body>
        <script>
            var a = '<!--<script>';
        </script>
        <p>Test</p>
    </body>
</html>

DOM tree of the above HTML

But these two scripts will show "Test":

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
    <body>
        <script>
            var a = '<!--';
        </script>
        <p>Test</p>
    </body>
</html>

And,

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
    <body>
        <script>
            var a = '<script>';
        </script>
        <p>Test</p>
    </body>
</html>

I don't understand, why does this happen?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

This raises the important point that the text inside of <script> tags on an HTML page is parsed by the HTML parser before it is parsed by the Javascript parser.

This code is not valid HTML5 syntax, so there is nothing in the HTML5 specification that would give us a clue about what is going one here. To be specific, there are two issues:

Both of these problem will put a browser's HTML parser into an error parsing mode, which means they are trying to make sense of invalid syntax. What browsers will do when trying to make sense of invalid syntax is undefined behavior, which technically means that anything can happen (such as nasal demons). The de facto behavior here seems to be that browsers are agreeing on how they handle this undefined behavior, but it is undefined behavior nonetheless.

For whatever reason, this combination of syntax issues next to each other causes browsers to ignore the text later in the document.


EDIT: I have identified how the parsing error is produced by stepping through this part of the HTML5 spec.

The text content of the script (excluding whitespace) is

var a = '<!--<script>';

This must match the following grammar rule:

data1 *( escape [ script-start data3 ] "-->" data1 ) [ escape ]

We can begin parsing the text content by matching data1, which has the following rule:

data1         = < any string that doesn't contain a substring that matches not-data1 >
not-data1     = "<!--"    

That is, the string var a = ' matches the data1 production. It ends there because the next part is <!--.

For there to be any text afterwards in the script, it must match the escape production, which is as follows:

escape        = "<!--" data2 *( script-start data3 script-end data2 )

Let's match the next part of the text. So far we have

data1    var a = '
escape   <!--
  data2  ???

Now nothing can be contained in data2 because the data2 production prohibits the substring <script> (i.e. a script-start)!

data2         = < any string that doesn't contain a substring that matches not-data2 >
not-data2     = script-start / "-->"  

The lexer cannot proceed with with valid steps according to the grammar, so the browser must now go into error processing.

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4  
I thought HTML5 specified exactly how error handling was supposed to work? –  icktoofay Jan 6 at 4:12
    
@Peter: ... which is precisely what I said but longer! Hopefully your answer will not get trashed like mine did. +1 –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 6 at 4:15
    
@icktoofay You are correct in the fact that HTML5 describes the parsing process precisely and is explicitly more forgiving than HTML 4.01 or XHTML in allowing "tag soup", so to speak. However, if the code is not parsable by the grammar in the HTML5 spec, it's up to the browsers to decide what to do. –  Peter Olson Jan 6 at 4:38

It 'll be some assumption being violated in the internal mechanism.

There's not much point trying to rationalise about this stuff.

You wrote invalid HTML, so anything can happen.

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By your first sentence, do you mean a bug? I never knew about this. I would have thought that the parser would be smart enough to figure that it was in a string. A bit of a gotcha. Besides '<script>' and comments what else does it apply to? Or am I missing something? (I didn't downvote btw). –  acarlon Jan 6 at 3:39
    
@acarlon: No, I don't mean a bug. Any software algorithm has preconditions and postconditions and it is fair for the software to set its preconditions to match the specification of the inputs. That is, the HTML5 specification. When that specification is violated because the input is invalid (as is the case here), the algorithm's preconditions may be broken, and the results unreliable. In the C++ world we call this "Undefined Behaviour". There will be a way to explain it in detail, but probably only through examining the source code of the rendering engine, which is utterly pointless. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 6 at 3:41
1  
@ruakh: I'm not confusing anything. The principle that computer systems must choose how to handle invalid input is universal and fundamental. Until browsers reject invalid HTML by displaying an error message to the user, they have to make a "best-guess" at rendering and, beyond a few suggestions in the spec (and I've checked — there are none for this) that means it's entirely up to the browser. It's UB. But if you choose to instead read my breakdown of this issue as "hur hur hur ur writing c++ hur hur" then go right ahead: I certainly can't stop you. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 6 at 3:44
1  
@acarlon: Sure, you could make a browser that did that. But why? It takes cycles. It takes time. It'll slow down your pages. All for invalid input. Make the input compliant, and everything is solved. And, yes, the contents of a script tag are controlled in 4.3.1.2. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 6 at 3:46
1  
@gslin: Follow the link in my answer to the W3C validator and find out for yourself! I didn't say it was a bug. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 6 at 4:19

Not a solution but… I see this tree in my browser:

<script>
    var a = '<!--<script>';
    </script>
    <p>Hello</p>
</script>
  • </script> in the source doesn't close the script element (instead the browser closes it when it reaches the end of the document)
  • <!-- in the source doesn't create an HTML comment node

2 changes to the source will close the script element as expected:

  • change (6) </script> to --></script>
  • change (6) </script> to </script></script>
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1  
You might want to specify which browser you're testing in. –  BoltClock Jan 6 at 4:51

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