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I am reading about index implementation using symbol tables in book by author Robert Sedwick in Algorithms in C++.

Below is snippet from the book

We can adapt binary search trees to build indices in precisely the same manner as we provided indirection for sorting and for heaps. Arrange for keys to be extracted from items via the key member function, as usual. Moreover, we can use parallel arrays for the links, as we did for linked lists. We use three arrays, one each for the items, left links, and right links. The links are array indices (integers), and we replace link references such as

x = x->l

in all our code with array references such as

x = l[x].

This approach avoids the cost of dynamic memory allocation for each node—the items occupy an array without regard to the search function, and we preallocate two integers per item to hold the tree links, recognizing that we will need at least this amount of space when all the items are in the search structure. The space for the links is not always in use, but it is there for use by the search routine without any time overhead for allocation. Another important feature of this approach is that it allows extra arrays (extra information associated with each node) to be added without the tree-manipulation code being changed at all. When the search routine returns the index for an item, it gives a way to access immediately all the information associated with that item, by using the index to access an appropriate array.

This way of implementing BSTs to aid in searching large arrays of items is sometimes useful, because it avoids the extra expense of copying items into the internal representation of the ADT, and the overhead of allocation and construction by new. The use of arrays is not appropriate when space is at a premium and the symbol table grows and shrinks markedly, particularly if it is difficult to estimate the maximum size of the symbol table in advance. If no accurate size prediction is possible, unused links might waste space in the item array.

My questions on above text are

  1. What does author mean by "we can use parallel arrays for the links as we did for linked lists" ? What does this statment mean and what are parallel arrays.

  2. What does author mean links are array indices and we replace link references such x= x->l with x=l[x]?

  3. What does author mean by "Another important feature of this approach is that it allows extra arrays (extra information associated with each node) to be added without the tree-manipulation code being changed at all." ?

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Use std::map from the STL. If possible use a C++11 compiler. –  Basile Starynkevitch Jan 6 at 6:04
    
@Basile, that may do for having data structures that you just want to use. but it's unlikely to be helpful if your intent is to understand how the data structures actually work :-) –  paxdiablo Jan 6 at 6:06
    
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You appear to have edited the text to take out the useful references. Either that or you have an earlier version of the text.

My third edition states that the index builds are covered in section 9.6, where it covers the process, and the parallel arrays are explained in chapter 3. The parallel arrays are simply storing the payload (the keys and possibly data that are held in the tree) and left/right pointers in three or more separate arrays, using the index to tie them together (x = left[x]). In that case, you may end up with something like:

int leftptr[100];
int rightptr[100];
char *payload[100];

and so on. In that example, node # 74 would have its data stored in payload[74], and the left and right "pointers" (actually indexes) stored in left[74] and right[74] respectively.

This is in contrast to having a single array of structures with the structure holding payload and pointers together (x = x->left;):

struct sNode {
    struct sNode *left, right;
    char payload[];
};

So, for your specific questions:

  1. Parallel arrays are simply separating the tree structure information from the payload information and using the index to tie together information from those arrays.

  2. Since you're using arrays for the links (and these arrays now hold array indexes rather than pointers), you no longer use x = x->left to move to the left child. Instead you use x = left[x].

  3. The tree manipulation is only interested in the links. By having the links separated from the payload (and other possibly useful information), the code for manipulating tree structure can be simpler.

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what do you mean by pay load information? can you please explain how parallel arrays for seperate tree structure from payload information with simple example –  venkysmarty Jan 6 at 8:29
    
@venkysmarty, I've added some extra detail which will hopefully make it clearer. –  paxdiablo Jan 6 at 9:18
    
thanks for detailed explanation. Now text makes sense. –  venkysmarty Jan 6 at 13:21
    
Can you please answer other question i have regarding this as you have access to book and I cannot describe completely here at stackoverflow.com/questions/20973625/… Thanks –  venkysmarty Jan 7 at 14:04
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If you haven't already, you should flip back in the book to the section on linked-lists where he says the technique was used previously (it's probably explained there).

Parallel arrays means we don't have a struct to hold the node information.

struct node {
    int data;
    struct node *left;
    struct node *right;
};

Instead, we have arrays.

int data[SIZE];
int left[SIZE];
int right[SIZE];

These are parallel arrays because we will use the same index to access the data and links. The node is represented in our code by an index, not a pointer. So for node 4, the data is at

data[4];

The left link is at

left[4];

Adding more information at the node can be done by creating yet another array of the same size.

int extra[SIZE];

The extra data for node 4 will be at

extra[4];
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Can you please answer other question i have regarding this as you have access to book and I cannot describe completely here at stackoverflow.com/questions/20973625/… Thanks –  venkysmarty Jan 7 at 14:05
    
Actually, I don't have the book. But I'm familiar with the technique. It's required in languages that don't have structure types. –  luser droog Jan 11 at 3:14
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