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I don't understant how the toAlert variable works here. Why is it assigned two quotation marks? I also don't understand the "toAlert" statement in the for loop block. Why does toAlert = toAlert?

After messing around with the function I wanted to see the effect the variable toAlert has if I were to change it. So I assigned it to

var toAlert;

and it only alerts one line of text as opposed to 5. Can anyone explain this to me?

var runAway = function(){
  var toAlert = "";
    for(var i = 0; i<5; i++){
      toAlert = toAlert + "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n";
    }
    alert(toAlert);
  }
}

runAway();
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4  
It'd be helpful to pick up a javascript book. This is something very basic. What's happening is that the variable toAlert is being concatenated with another strings multiple times, and you "alert" only once. –  Thrustmaster Jan 6 '14 at 7:22
    
You are having extra closing curly brace '}' before runAway(); –  ram Jan 6 '14 at 7:26
1  
there is only 2 open brackets for 3 close brackets –  atrepp Jan 6 '14 at 7:26
    
"it only alerts one line of text" : no it doesn't! It would alert undefined then the 5 lines if you didn't assign it to an empty string –  user2203117 Jan 6 '14 at 7:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

var toAlert = "" ; indicates that toAlert is a variable of type string

toAlert = toAlert + "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n";

is to concatenate the string "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n" to the value of toAlert

Inside the for loop ,

the first time, toAlert is empty , and so after the execution of the statement toAlert = toAlert + "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n"; , the value of toAlert will be

""+"Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n"

because + behaves like a concatenation operator in case of strings, it concatenates two 'strings'

The second time , it will be

"Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n" + "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n"

If you need to append the string 5 times , your code would be

var runAway = function(){
    var toAlert = "";
    for(var i = 0; i<5; i++)
    {
        toAlert = toAlert + "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n";
    }
    alert(toAlert);
}

runAway();
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@EmilioGort : no he isn't –  harsha Jan 6 '14 at 7:27
var toAlert = "";

That's an empty String. At first the toAlert variable is just an empty String.

toAlert = toAlert + "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n";

You're appending "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n" to the previous value of the toAlert variable.

toAlert += "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n";

You can write it that way.

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    var runAway = function(){
    var toAlert = "";         // 1. this is just an empty string. Probably so that that they can customize it to how they want when they call alert(toAlert)
      for(var i = 0; i<5; i++){
        toAlert = toAlert + "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n";
      }
      alert(toAlert);
    }
    }

runAway();
  1. For example, the coder could call alert("This is error #424343 in div id #cats"); So that would show up in the alert if that error happens. Then the coder has another alert/error message that he wants to show if there's an error in div id #dogs. So he would type alert("This is error whatever, in div id #dogs"); to call that customized error message for that specific event.
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  var runAway = function(){
   var toAlert = "";
   for(var i = 0; i<5; i++){
      toAlert = toAlert + "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n";
   }
   alert(toAlert);
  }


runAway is a function that has a variable named toAlert which is of string type, and then it iterates using for loop and concatenates the runAway string and adds "Lions, Tigers, and Bears, Oh My!!\n" on each iteration. After completion of iteration it alerts the complete string.

And a closing parenthesis is extra in your code.

what exactly did you not get in this ?

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