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I am updating a PowerShell script that manages some .NET assemblies. The script was written for assemblies built against .NET 2 (the same version of the framework that PowerShell runs with), but now needs to work with .NET 4 assemblies as well as .NET 2 assemblies.

Since .NET 4 supports running applications built against older versions of the framework, it seems like the simplest solution is to launch PowerShell with the .NET 4 runtime when I need to run it against .NET 4 assemblies.

How can I run PowerShell with the .NET 4 runtime?

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Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/1940983/…. –  Jeremy McGee Jan 19 '10 at 20:21
3  
These days the easiest solution would be to install the Powershell 3.0 CTP which uses CLRVersion: 4.0.30319.1. –  jon Z Nov 16 '11 at 12:13

8 Answers 8

up vote 96 down vote accepted

PowerShell (the engine) runs fine under .NET 4.0. PowerShell ( the console host and the ISE) do not, simply because they were compiled against older versions of .NET. There's a registry setting that will change the .NET framework loaded systemwide, which will in turn allow PowerShell to use .NET 4.0 classes:

reg add hklm\software\microsoft\.netframework /v OnlyUseLatestCLR /t REG_DWORD /d 1
reg add hklm\software\wow6432node\microsoft\.netframework /v OnlyUseLatestCLR /t REG_DWORD /d 1

To update just the ISE to use .NET 4.0, you can change the config ($psHome\powershell_ise.exe.config) file to have a chunk like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
    <startup>
      <supportedRuntime version="v4.0.30319" />
    </startup>
</configuration>

You can build .NET 4.0 applications that call PowerShell using the PowerShell API (System.Management.Automation.PowerShell) just fine, but these steps will help get the in-the-box PowerShell hosts to work under .NET 4.0

Hope this helps

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7  
Just to be clear, powershell.exe (the console host app) itself is a native application - not managed. –  Keith Hill Jan 20 '10 at 1:43
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I figured out my problem from above. You have to put the config file in the 64-bit directory when running on a 64-bit OS. The 32-bit powershell executable seems to pick up the change just fine from there. –  Chris McKenzie Oct 31 '11 at 18:33
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Just one small advice. Remove the registry keys when you don't need them any more. I just lost a ton of time trying to find out why I couldn't build some .NET 3.5 project I am working on. –  Klark Dec 15 '11 at 14:15
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The proposed registry modification solution has nasty side-effects if you're doing multi-targeting (i.e. writing .NET 2.0 apps in VS2010). Beware. –  Todd Sprang Dec 16 '11 at 19:14
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Note that Microsoft warns strongly against doing this: "While it is possible to force PowerShell 2.0 to run with .NET Framework 4.0 using various mechanisms such as creating a config file for PowerShell or editing the registry, these mechanisms aren't supported and can have negative side effects on other PowerShell functionality such as PowerShell remoting and cmdlets with mixed-mode assemblies." connect.microsoft.com/PowerShell/feedback/details/525435/… Powershell 3.0 has native support for .NET 4.0. –  Timbo Oct 17 '12 at 17:44

The best solution I have found is in the blog post Using Newer Version(s) of .NET with PowerShell. This allows powershell.exe to run with .NET 4 assemblies.

Simply modify (or create) $pshome\powershell.exe.config so that it contains the following:

<?xml version="1.0"?> 
<configuration> 
    <startup useLegacyV2RuntimeActivationPolicy="true"> 
        <supportedRuntime version="v4.0.30319"/> 
        <supportedRuntime version="v2.0.50727"/> 
    </startup> 
</configuration> 

Additional, quick setup notes:

Locations and files are somewhat platform dependent; however will give you an inline gist of how to make the solution work for you.

  • You can find PowerShell's location on your computer by executing cd $pshome in the Powershell window (doesn't work from DOS prompt).
    • Path will be something like (example) C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\
  • The filename to put configuration in is: powershell.exe.config if your PowerShell.exe is being executed (create the config file if need be).
    • If PowerShellISE.Exe is running then you need to create its companion config file as PowerShellISE.Exe.config
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14  
Definitely the correct way to do it. This alters only the behavior of Powershell, not every other .NET app on your machine... –  Erik A. Brandstadmoen Mar 11 '11 at 7:12
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This works well but affects all your PowerShell. If you want just some of the functionality make a copy of the powershell folder and then edit the file there. –  Matt Aug 16 '11 at 16:45
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I added a file as noted above. However, I can no longer run PowerShell with that file present - I get the error "The volume for a file has been externally altered so that the opened file is no longer valid." Any ideas? –  JoshL Oct 5 '11 at 18:36
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You may also want to create a powershell_ise.exe.config file (with the same contents). –  Matt Varblow Oct 6 '11 at 20:13
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@JoshL - on a 64 bit system, I've found the .exe.config needs to go into SysWOW64\WindowsPowershell (the 32 bit folder), even if you're trying to run 64 bit powershell. Otherwise you get the 'externally altered' error. –  Sam Dec 6 '11 at 2:43

Please be VERY careful with using the registry key approach. These are machine-wide keys and forcibily migrate ALL applications to .NET 4.0.

Many products do not work if forcibily migrated and this is a testing aid and not a production quality mechanism. Visual Studio 2008 and 2010, MSBuild, turbotax, and a host of websites, SharePoint and so on should not be automigrated.

If you need to use PowerShell with 4.0, this should be done on a per-application basis with a configuration file, you should check with the PowerShell team on the precise recommendation. This is likely to break some existing PowerShell commands.

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Very good point about using the registry key. Happily, the launcher application with config file is working just fine. Our scripts primarily use file system commands and direct .NET calls, and we have not noticed any problems with broken commands. Since .NET 4 is largely backward compatible with .NET 2.0, I would not think it likely that there would be many broken commands (though it never hurts to be cautions :). –  Emperor XLII Jun 11 '10 at 13:15

If you only need to execute a single command, script block, or script file in .NET 4, try using Activation Configuration Files from .NET 4 to start only a single instance of PowerShell using version 4 of the CLR:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff361644.aspx

Full details:

http://blog.codeassassin.com/2011/03/23/executing-individual-powershell-commands-using-net-4/

An example PowerShell module:

https://gist.github.com/882528

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Here is the contents of the configuration file I used to support both .NET 2.0 and .NET 4 assemblies:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <!-- http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w4atty68.aspx -->
  <startup useLegacyV2RuntimeActivationPolicy="true">
    <supportedRuntime version="v4.0" />
    <supportedRuntime version="v2.0.50727" />
  </startup>
</configuration>

Also, here’s a simplified version of the PowerShell 1.0 compatible code I used to execute our scripts from the passed in command line arguments:

class Program {
  static void Main( string[] args ) {
    Console.WriteLine( ".NET " + Environment.Version );

    string script = "& " + string.Join( " ", args );
    Console.WriteLine( script );
    Console.WriteLine( );

    // Simple host that sends output to System.Console
    PSHost host = new ConsoleHost( this );
    Runspace runspace = RunspaceFactory.CreateRunspace( host );

    Pipeline pipeline = runspace.CreatePipeline( );
    pipeline.Commands.AddScript( script );

    try {
      runspace.Open( );
      IEnumerable<PSObject> output = pipeline.Invoke( );
      runspace.Close( );

      // ...
    }
    catch( RuntimeException ex ) {
      string psLine = ex.ErrorRecord.InvocationInfo.PositionMessage;
      Console.WriteLine( "error : {0}: {1}{2}", ex.GetType( ), ex.Message, psLine );
      ExitCode = -1;
    }
  }
}

In addition to the basic error handling shown above, we also inject a trap statement into the script to display additional diagnostic information (similar to Jeffrey Snover's Resolve-Error function).

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I'd be interested in seeing all error handling... –  makerofthings7 Mar 27 '12 at 1:35

Actually, you can get PowerShell to run using .NET 4 without affecting other .NET applications. I needed to do so to use the new HttpWebRequest "Host" property, however changing the "OnlyUseLatestCLR" broke Fiddler as that could not be used under .NET 4.

The developers of PowerShell obviously foresaw this happening, and they added a registry key to specify what version of the Framework it should use. One slight issue is that you need to take ownership of the registry key before changing it, as even administrators do not have access.

  • HKLM:\Software\Microsoft\Powershell\1\PowerShellEngine\RuntimeVersion (64 bit and 32 bit)
  • HKLM:\Software\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Powershell\1\PowerShellEngine\RuntimeVersion (32 bit on 64 bit machine)

Change the value of that key to the required version. Keep in mind though that some snapins may no longer load unless they are .NET 4 compatible (WASP is the only one I have had trouble with, but I don't really use it anyway). VMWare, SQL Server 2008, PSCX, Active Directory (Microsoft and Quest Software) and SCOM all work fine.

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+1 This is a very important alternative (and better) than the other reg entry which will affect all .net applications, but this solution only affects powershell. –  Christian Mikkelsen Mar 1 '12 at 10:15
    
After implementing the "OnlyUseLatestCLR" my Fiddler broke as well as some powershell scripts not runnign anymore due to not being able to contact certain servers. I manually changed the values back to 0 in the regedt32, and now eveything working again. Thanks! –  Neville Jul 14 '13 at 23:06
    
What are WASP, PSCX, and SCOM (in this context)? –  Peter Mortensen Sep 1 '13 at 18:27

If you don't want to modify the registry or app.config files, an alternate way is to create a simple .NET 4 console app that mimicks what PowerShell.exe does and hosts the PowerShell ConsoleShell.

See Option 2 – Hosting Windows PowerShell yourself

First, add a reference to the System.Management.Automation and Microsoft.PowerShell.ConsoleHost assemblies which can be found under %programfiles%\Reference Assemblies\Microsoft\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0

Then use the following code:

using System;
using System.Management.Automation.Runspaces;
using Microsoft.PowerShell;

namespace PSHostCLRv4
{
    class Program
    {
        static int Main(string[] args)
        {
            var config = RunspaceConfiguration.Create();
                return ConsoleShell.Start(
                config,
                "Windows PowerShell - Hosted on CLR v4\nCopyright (C) 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.",
                "",
                args
            );
        }
    }
}
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Very cool... I think I could find some uses for that! –  John Baughman Oct 4 '11 at 22:28

Just as another option, the latest PoshConsole release includes binaries targeted to .NET 4 RC (which work fine against the RTM release) without any configuration.

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1  
The link should be: poshconsole.codeplex.com –  Kevin Driedger Jun 17 '10 at 15:39

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