Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Q: How can I check if two floating point numbers are equal?

A: You can do something like this:

#define EPSILON 0.00000001
int compare(double num1, double num2, double error)
{
    if(fabs(num1 - num2) < EPSILON)
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}

Q: How can I check if two floating point numbers are equal with some acceptable error? Meaning, I have two numbers, a = 9.2 and b = 9.7. When I set my error = 0.7 then I can consider a and b equal. (Its also true for a = 9.2 and b = 9.9 but false for a = 9.2 and b = 10.0 when the error is 0.7).

A: I tried this but every time (no matter how error look like), it always shows 0:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>

#define EPSILON 0.00000001

static int compare(double num1, double num2, double error)
{
    if((fabs(num1 - num2) < EPSILON - error) || (fabs(num1 - num2 + error) < EPSILON + error))
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}

static int areEqual(const double *x, int size, double error)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < size - 1; i++)
        if (!compare(x[i], x[i + 1], error))
            return 0;
    return 1;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

    double tab[] = {9.2, 9.7, 9.3, 9.6, 9.4, 10.0, 9.1, 9.7};
    double error = 0.9;
    const int N = 10;

    printf("%d\n", areEqual(tab, N, error));


    return 0;
}

Tried also do it this way:

static int compare2(double num1, double num2, double error)
{
    if(fabs(num1 - num2) <= error)
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}

But shows 0 too.

EDIT:

Finally, did it! Working code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <float.h>

#define EPSILON 0.00000001

static void checkFabs()
{
    printf("%d\n", fabs(-0.7) < 1.0);
    printf("%d\n", fabs(-0.75) < 1.0);
    printf("%d\n", fabs(-0.71) < 1.0);

    printf("%d\n", fabs(0.5) < 0.9);
    printf("%d\n", fabs(0.6) < 0.9);
    printf("%d\n", fabs(0.3) < 0.9);
    printf("%d\n", fabs(0.2) < 0.9);
    printf("%d\n", fabs(0.8) < 0.9);
    printf("%d\n", fabs(0.1) < 0.9);
    printf("%d\n", fabs(0.9) <= 0.9);
}

static int compare(double num1, double num2, double error)
{
    if(fabs(num1-num2) <= error + EPSILON)
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}

static int areEqual(const double *x, int size, double error)
{
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < size - 1; i++)
        if (!compare(x[i], x[i + 1], error))
            return 0;
    return 1;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{

    double tab[] = {9.2, 9.7, 9.3, 9.6, 9.4, 9.9, 9.1, 9.7};
    double error = 0.9;
    const int N = 8;

    printf("%d\n", areEqual(tab, N, error));

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
isn't it that they are considered equal if fabs(num1-num2)<=error –  Rob Jan 6 at 10:25
    
@Rob: it should be but I'm getting 0 as well, look: ideone.com/m1Sh8i :( –  mazix Jan 6 at 10:26
1  
Using your EPSILON : fabs(num1-num2)<=error+EPSILON. However fabs(9.2-9.7) == 0.5 so the first one will work (I think passing size=10 is wrong btw) –  Rob Jan 6 at 10:29
1  
Check if fabs is working properly, Use fabs(-0.7) < 1.0 or something like that. –  Don't You Worry Child Jan 6 at 10:37
1  
@mazix : Fine!! But I will suggest you to compare with few more closer values like 0.75, 0.71. This would also help you to get idea of accuracy. –  Don't You Worry Child Jan 6 at 10:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are 8 elements in your array, not 10. Here is the compare function that you need:

static int compare(double num1, double num2, double error)
{
    if(fabs(num1 - num2) < error + EPSILON)
        return 1;
    else
        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

EPSILON - error in your code is a negative number!

Just compare it to error only.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesnt work too ... : ideone.com/1gIrtm –  mazix Jan 6 at 10:33
    
It does work. Your function areEqual returns zero when 2 number are not equal. 10.0 and 9.1 are more than 0.8 apart... –  egur Jan 6 at 10:38
    
When I change error to 0.9 the code still shows 0 ... ideone.com/t0pNMY –  mazix Jan 6 at 10:40
    
Your code runs and prints 1 when setting error to 0.9. Try to rebuild. –  egur Jan 6 at 10:41
    
Very strange! Take a look: s28.postimg.org/5t1xaoh3x/rax2.png. I rebuilded it, but still getting 0! Why? –  mazix Jan 6 at 10:46

don't define epsilon and compare using DBL_EPSILON defined in float.h header.

you have missed the error.

its actually subtracting last value with 0. so its above relative error.

checkout size.

share|improve this answer
    
Something like this: ideone.com/r3e7pv? Still 0 ... –  mazix Jan 6 at 10:38
    
DBL_EPSILON specifies distance between floating-point values (in a certain sense), not the amount of error inherent in floating-point calculations. Likely neither it nor the OP’s EPSILON are ideal for whatever it is they are trying to do. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 6 at 20:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.