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I have a question regarding the Collections in gson de-serializing

Result :
Line 1 : it compiled without any error.
Line 2 : it compiled without any error. Prints [1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0].
Line 2 : It throws "Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ClassCastException: java.lang.Double cannot be cast to gsonUserGuide.com.google.sites.A"

My question: I know that I can specify the type correctly as follows.

ArrayList<Integer> aList = gson.fromJson( 
            "[1,2,3,4]", new TypeToken<ArrayList<Integer>>() {}.getType());

But my question is, if it throws java.lang.ClassCastException in Line 3 why it doesn't give an error while loading values to aList at least at Runtime?

Code :

public class OBJConversion {

    private final static Gson gson = new Gson();

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // Line 1
        ArrayList<A> aList = gson.fromJson("[1,2,3,4]", ArrayList.class);
        // Line 2
        System.out.println("main().aList : " + aList);
        // Line 3
        System.out.println("main().someString : " + aList.get(0).getSomeString());
    }

    class A {

        String someString = null;

        public String getSomeString() {
            return someString;
        }

        public void setSomeString(String someString) {
            this.someString = someString;
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why

This is one of the Collections Limitations when using GSON:

You can serialize collection of arbitrary objects but can not deserialize from it because there is no way for the user to indicate the type of the resulting object.

GSON interprets gson.fromJson("[1,2,3,4]", ArrayList.class) as a list of primitives (it cannot tell from the ArrayList<A> that you want type A because the type information is lost at runtime). GSON has different primitives than Java, and does not have an int, so [1,2,3,4] is treated as a list of Numbers which are double floating point precision, a Java Double. Thus, GSON effectively creates a List<Double>.

Workaround

GSON suggests three workarounds:

  1. Parse it by hand, as in this example,
  2. Register a type adapter for Collection.class, or
  3. Register a type adapter for A and use fromJson(aList, Collection<A>.class).

Option 2, for example, would look something like this:

public class OBJConversion {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Gson gson = new GsonBuilder()
                // NOTE: all Lists will be treated as List<A>
                .registerTypeAdapter(List.class, new ACollectionAdapter())
                .create();

        // Line 1
        List<A> aList = gson.fromJson("[1,2,3,4]", List.class));
        // Line 2
        System.out.println("main().aList : " + aList);
        // Line 3
        System.out.println("main().someString : " + aList.get(0).getSomeString());
    }

    static class ACollectionAdapter extends TypeAdapter<List<A>> {

        @Override
        public void write(
                JsonWriter out, List<A> value) throws IOException {
            out.beginArray();
            for (A a : value) {
                out.value(a.getSomeString());
            }
            out.endArray();
        }

        @Override
        public List<A> read(JsonReader in) throws IOException {
            List<A> as = new ArrayList<A>();
            in.beginArray();
            while (in.hasNext()) {
                A a = new A();
                a.setSomeString(in.nextString());
                as.add(a);
            }
            in.endArray();
            return as;
        }
    }

    static class A {

        String someString = null;

        public String getSomeString() {
            return someString;
        }

        public void setSomeString(String someString) {
            this.someString = someString;
        }
    }
}
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Got it kuporific. Thank you for the nice explanation –  Namalak Jan 7 at 1:46

That's because the type information (the <A> in ArrayList<A>) is no longer available at run-time. Generic types are used exclusively during compilation and are "erased" afterwards, and the code is finally compiled into something like

ArrayList aList = gson.fromJson("[1,2,3,4]", ArrayList.class);

(note the removal of the <A> type argument in the declaration) This is the reason, why you have to provide the type information (via "type token") at run-time, if you want to make the code really type safe. The type information is only available under special circumstances (which is actually used by the type token implementation).

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