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I have a very large file that looks something like this:

1,22,A
2,10,A
3,4,B
4,3,B
5,20,B

The second column tells me how many instances of the third column there are. So I want to collapse the third column (so that it is effectively uniqued), but add up the second column values. Desired output would be something like:

32,A
27,B

I can come up with some rather complicated ways to do this, but it seems like it ought to be rather simple...

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After researching more, I was able to modify another entry, and used the following to generate the desired output: awk '{counts[$3]++; totals[$3] +=$2;} END {for (x in counts) {print x, totals [x];}}' –  SimeonA Jan 6 '14 at 13:24

1 Answer 1

I'm not sure what kind of "math" answer you would expect...

Given you have a file input.txt with the following content:

1,22,A
2,10,A
3,4,B
4,3,B
5,20,B

Create a new file with the following script in Ruby, put in the same directory as your input.txt, and run ruby script.rb from the console:

File.open('output.txt', 'w+') do |file|
  result = {}

  File.readlines("input.txt").each do |line|
    values = line.split(',')

    letter       = values[2]
    letter_value = values[1].to_i

    result[letter] ||= 0
    result[letter] += letter_value
  end

  result.each do |letter, value|
    file << [value, letter].join(', ')
  end
end

Then, look for your result in output.txt in the same directory.

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OK, I tried that, but no output.txt file was created. Also, no error messages. I'm completely unfamiliar with Ruby, so I have no idea how to trouble shoot this one. –  SimeonA Jan 6 '14 at 12:59
    
I just fixed the script to leave the output.txt files in the same folder. –  gmile Jan 6 '14 at 14:27

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