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In Java, The following statement just looks very messy when you have a lot of terms:

if(a.equals("x") || a.equals("y") || a.equals("z") || Any number of terms...... )
    //Do something

Is there a cleaner way of performing the same action, I would like my code to be as readable as possible.

NOTE: x, y and z are just placeholders for any string of any length. There could be 20 string terms here of variable length in if condition each being OR'd together

Thanks

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Kevin Panko, Eric, A--C, Lego Stormtroopr, Aristos Jan 7 at 8:47

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
It really depends upon the context. There are so many options here depending upon the purpose of the condition, and the items being compared. –  crush Jan 6 at 14:42
3  
I'm pretty sure that this was just a general example and not really the problem you were facing, right? –  noone Jan 6 at 14:43
5  
Why not try with RegEx. if(a.matches("[xyz]"))... –  Susai Jan 6 at 14:44
3  
@AllanMacmillan haha, now you have a lot of upvoted answers here, which do not answer your question at all :D –  noone Jan 6 at 14:48
3  
The answer to this question will depend strongly on your particular situation. You haven't provided enough context for anyone to really give a good answer. This question will generate a lot of answers and most of them won't be applicable to your specific case. –  David Mays Jan 6 at 20:44
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17 Answers

up vote 44 down vote accepted
Set<String> stuff = new HashSet<String>();
stuff.add("x");
stuff.add("y");
stuff.add("z");
if(stuff.contains(a)) {
    //stuff
}

If this is a tight loop you can use a static Set.

static Set<String> stuff;
static {
    stuff = new HashSet<String>();
    stuff.add("x");
    stuff.add("y");
    stuff.add("z");
}

//Somewhere else in the cosmos

if(stuff.contains(a)) {
    //stuff
}

And if you want to be extra sure nothing is getting modified while you're not looking.

Set<String> test = Collections.unmodifiableSet(new HashSet<String>() {
        {
            add("x");
            add("y");
            add("z");
        }
    });

If you just want to get some logic in there for a handful of hard coded conditions then one of the switch or if statement with newlines solutions might be better. But if you have a lot of conditions then it might be good to separate your configuration from logic.

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42  
Shorter version: Collections.addAll(stuff, "x", "y", "z"); –  assylias Jan 6 at 14:43
7  
This still has poor readability in the sense that it uses up many lines if you have a lot of Strings –  Allan Macmillan Jan 6 at 14:48
4  
Am I the only user on SO who thinks this answer is terrible? So much overhead. And stuff is detached from the logic of the if statement so becomes hard to read. –  Bathsheba Jan 6 at 15:19
15  
You should just be glad I didn't post the Spring solution using an XML configuration of the set. –  HahaHortness Jan 6 at 17:29
3  
Sir, you can insult my family, my body, my race, my religion, my politics, but I will not let you insult XML. –  HahaHortness Jan 6 at 19:15
show 10 more comments

What do you think looks "unclean" about it?

If you have a bunch of complicated boolean logic, you might separate the different parts of it into individual boolean variables and refer to them in the if statement.

Or you could create a function that takes your 'a' variable and returns a boolean. You'd just be hiding your logic in the method, but it would clean up your if statement.

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10  
I think this is the only valid answer here. All others just solve an example problem and do not help anyhow in general. –  noone Jan 6 at 14:44
2  
I concur with @noone. The question is too vague to be answered well. –  crush Jan 6 at 14:45
2  
Not that OP was concerned with it, but breaking it out to another function will help with unit testing as well. –  Ryan Jan 6 at 17:04
5  
@crush I smiled reading this. There is noone that you concur with. –  Cruncher Jan 6 at 17:45
1  
Moving the logic into method with a descriptive name - such as isValidFooChar in this case - would improve code readability in many cases. –  Joseph Earl Jan 6 at 22:26
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Alternatively, if you are using Java 7+ you can use strings in switch/case. For example (I extracted this from an Oracle doc and modified)

         switch (str) {

             case "x":
             case "y":
             case "z":
                 //do action
                 break;
             default:
              throw new IllegalArgumentException("argument not matched "+str);

    }

Here is the link

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12  
@downvoter - can you please specify the reason ? –  Lakshitha Ranasingha Jan 6 at 14:53
4  
@keshlam - you missed the OP's note "x, y and z are just placeholders for any string of any length." –  Markus Malkusch Jan 7 at 3:36
    
And this only works with strings.. and you have to know the cases, it's not a good solution for big possibilities. –  nachokk Jan 12 at 20:20
add comment

Use a regular expression

If (a.matches("[xyz]")){
    // matches either "x", "y", or "z"

or, for longer strings,

If (a.matches("one|two|three")){
    // matches either "one", "two" or "three"

But this is computationally expensive, but probably not much worse than instantiating a set etc. But it's the clearest way I can think of.

But in the end, the nicest way is probably to leave things as they are, with an adjustment to the formatting:

if (a.equals("x") || 
    a.equals("y") || 
    a.equals("z")
    ){

There is then absolutely no ambiguity in what the code is doing and so your code will be easier to maintain. If performance matters, you can even put the most likely occurrences towards the top of the list.

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Probably required, yes! –  assylias Jan 6 at 14:48
    
Wouldn't this match 'asfsbxaskdfk'? seems it should be ^[xyz]$ –  crush Jan 6 at 14:49
3  
@crush No, matches requires a match against the complete input sequence. –  Marko Topolnik Jan 6 at 14:49
1  
I don’t think, it’s “computationally expensive”. Depending on the actual strings it can be even faster than all other approaches (multiple equals or using Sets). A HashSet uses an expensive hashing operation which pays off for a large number of Strings only. On the other hand, the regular expression implementation can be more efficient than equals for large Strings due to its internal optimizations. –  Holger Jan 6 at 20:11
4  
You should've started your answer with "Everybody stand back!". –  Dheeraj V.S. Jan 7 at 5:35
show 2 more comments

Reaching for semantics

On a semantic level, what you are checking for is set membership. However, you implement it on a very low level, basically inlining all the code needed to achieve the check. Apart from forcing the reader to infer the intent behind that massive condition, a prominent issue with such an approach is the large number of degrees of freedom in a general Boolean expression: to be sure the whole thing amounts to just checking set membership, one must carefully inspect each clause, minding any parentheses, misspellings of the repeated variable name, and more.

Each loose degree of freedom means exposure to not just one more bug, but to one more class of bugs.

An approach which uses an explicit set would have these advantages:

  • clear and explicit semantics;
  • tight constraint on the degrees of freedom to look after;
  • O(1) time complexity vs. O(n) complexity of your code.

This is the code needed to implement a set-based idiom:

static final Set<String> matches = 
                            unmodifiableSet(new HashSet<>(asList("a","b","c")));
...

if (matches.contains(a)) // do something;

*I'm implying import static java.util.Arrays.asList and import static java.util.Collections.unmodifiableSet

share|improve this answer
    
Why Set? and not List? –  MariuszS Jan 6 at 14:43
1  
List searches linearly, no? At best, you'd do a binary search on a list. Hashset is O(1) because you have a hash code key. –  crush Jan 6 at 14:43
11  
List is O(N) to check for membership, set is O(1). Much faster for larger collections. –  Tim B Jan 6 at 14:45
1  
@nachokk not if you have an import static java.util.Arrays.asList; –  assylias Jan 6 at 14:53
1  
and i don't know why you got few upvotes , this is the best answer –  nachokk Jan 7 at 16:16
show 23 more comments

Readability Is Mostly Formatting

Not readable...

if(a.equals("x") || a.equals("y") || a.equals("z") || Any number of terms...... )
    //Do something

Now easy to real...

if(a.equals("x") || 
   a.equals("y") || 
   a.equals("z") ||
   Any number of terms...... )
    //Do something

Readability is very subjective to the person reading the source code.

If I came across code that implements collections, loops or one of the many other complicated answers here. I'd shake my head in disbelieve.

Separate The Logic From The Problem

You are mixing two different things. There is the problem of making the business logic easy to read, and the problem of implementing the business logic.

 if(validState(a))
     // Do something

How you implement validState doesn't matter. What's important is that code with the if statement is readable as business logic. It should not be a long chain of Boolean operations that hide the intent of what is happening.

Here is an example of readable business logic.

if(!isCreditCard(a)) {
    return false;
}
if(isExpired(a)) {
    return false;
}
return paymentAuthorized(a);

At some level there has to be code that processes basic logic, strings, arrays, etc.. etc.. but it shouldn't be at this level.

If you find you often have to check if a string is equal to a bunch of other strings. Put that code into a string utility class. Separate it from your work and keep your code readable. By ensuring it shows what you're really trying to do.

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With a little bit of help, you can get the syntactic sugar of a nicer if-statement with just a tiny bit of overhead. To elaborate on Tim's recommendation and Jesko's recommendation a tad further...

public abstract class Criteria {

  public boolean matchesAny( Object... objects ) {
    for( int i = 0, count = objects.length; i < count; i++ ) {
      Object object = objects[i];
      if( matches( object ) ) {
        return true;
      }
    }
    return false;
  }

  public boolean matchesAll( Object... objects ) {
    for( int i = 0, count = objects.length; i < count; i++ ) {
      Object object = objects[i];
      if( !matches( object ) ) {
        return false;
      }
    }
    return true;
  }

  public abstract boolean matches( Object object );

}

public class Identity extends Criteria {

  public static Identity of( Object self ) {
    return new Identity( self );
  }

  private final Object self;

  public Identity( Object self ) {
    this.self = self;
  }

  @Override
  public boolean matches( Object object ) {
    return self != null ? self.equals( object ) : object == null;
  }

}

Your if-statement would then look like this:

if( Identity.of( a ).matchesAny( "x", "y", "z" ) ) {
  ...
}

This is sort of a middle ground between having a generic syntax for this sort of conditional matching and having the expression describe a specific intent. Following this pattern also lets you perform the same sort of matching using criteria other than equality, much like how Comparators are designed.

Even with the improved syntax, this conditional expression is still just a little bit too complex. Further refactoring might lead to externalizing the terms "x", "y", "z" and moving the expression into a method whose name clearly defines its intent:

private static final String [] IMPORTANT_TERMS = {
  "x",
  "y",
  "z"
};

public boolean isImportant( String term ) {
  return Identity.of( term ).matchesAny( IMPORTANT_TERMS );
}

...and your original if-statement would finally be reduced to...

if( isImportant( a ) ) {
  ...
}

That's much better, and now the method containing your conditional expression can more readily focus on Doing One Thing.

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2  
Adding an extra layer of abstraction and giving it a concise name is a great way to improve readability. +1 –  Adam Jan 6 at 22:34
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You can use Arrays.asList().This is the simplest approach and less verbosity.

Arrays.asList("x","y","z"...).contains(a)

For performance reason if your collection is too big you could put data in a HashSet cause searching there is in constant time.

Example make your own util method

public final class Utils{

    private Utils(){}//don't let instantiate

    public static <T> boolean contains(T a,T ... x){
      return new HashSet<>(Arrays.asList(x)).contains(a);
    }
}    

Then in your client code:

if(Utils.contains(a,"x","y","z","n")){
  //execute some code
}
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2  
This is a syntax error... it should be Arrays.asList(new String[]{"a","b","c"...}) –  Doorknob Jan 6 at 14:42
4  
@DoorknobofSnow more likely Arrays.asList("a","b","c"); –  assylias Jan 6 at 14:45
1  
@nachokk You should take your own advice to "read more on Collections.addAll" :) It's a boolean method. Also, by # you imply an instance method; you should use . both for asList and addAll. –  Marko Topolnik Jan 6 at 14:53
    
@MarkoTopolnik thanks i didn't know that # was for instance, and . to class level methods (static) –  nachokk Jan 6 at 14:57
1  
Well, it's a semi-convention, carried over from Ruby. –  Marko Topolnik Jan 6 at 15:03
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Independent of what you are trying to achieve, this

if(a.equals("x") || a.equals("y") || a.equals("z") || Any number of terms...... )
    //Do something

is always messy and unclean. In the first place it is just too long to make sense of it quickly.

The simplest solution for me would be to express your intend instead of being explicit.

Try to do this instead:

   public class SomeClass{
    public void SomeMethod(){
        if ( matchesSignificantChar(a) ){
          //doSomething
        }    
    }
    private bool matchesSignificantChar(String s){
        return (s.equals("x") || s.equals("y") || s.equals("z") || Any number of terms......    )
      }
   }

This simplifies the scope of your conditional statement and makes it easier to understand while moving the complexity to a much smaller and named scope, that is headed by your intend.

However, this is still not very extensible. If you try to make it cleaner, you can extract the boolean method into another class and pass it as a delegate to SomeClass'es Constructor or even to SomeMethod. Also you can look into the Strategy Pattern for even more exensiblity.

Keep in mind that as a programmer you will spend much more time reading code (not only yours) than writing it, so creating better understandable code will pay off in the long run.

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I believe this doesn't address what the OP asked. The OP (probably) wanted an alternative to the expression s.equals("x") || ..., not getting rid of if simply putting the condition inside a method as a black box. Using a method for a complex condition is a good idea but you should also address how to write that condition in a readable way to completely answer the question. –  Bakuriu Jan 6 at 17:32
    
@Bakuriu I appreciate your comment. I am offering another perspective based on my interpretation of the question. My suggestion touches on the fact that putting this specific statement into a closed named/titled scope which will make the statement itself more understandable. So, there might not even be a reason to change it at all. However, if the OP thinks that the statement is still not understandable I suggested more possibilities. The OP will surely select the most appropriate answer himself and I am glad to provide more insight if required. –  Jesko R. Jan 6 at 17:58
    
+1 for readability –  MUG4N Jan 6 at 20:27
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I use following pattern

boolean cond = false; // Name this variable reasonably

cond = cond || a.equals("x");
cond = cond || a.equals("y");
cond = cond || a.equals("z");

// Any number of terms......

if (cond) {
    // ...
}

Note: no objects created on the heap. Also you can use any conditions, not only "equals".

In ruby you can use operator ||= for this purpose like cond ||= a.equals("x").

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1  
If a is the first thing checked then this will execute a lot of unnecessary code. –  sweeneyrod Jan 6 at 19:45
1  
This is not true. If a is "x", then cond becomes true and no more equals() get called. The tiny overhead evaluating cond == true doesn't matter much. –  Boris Brodski Jan 6 at 19:52
1  
Lazy eval makes this nice. I'd usually go for this unless this particular problem is all over the place. If it's not, this won't force me to eventually look into another layer of abstraction if I have to maintain the code. TL;DR +1 –  Romiox Jan 6 at 23:37
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The Set answer is good. When not comparing for membership of a collection you can also separate out some or all of the conditional statement into methods. For example

if (inBounds(x) && shouldProcess(x) ) {
}
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If a is guaranteed to be of length 1, you could do:

if ("xyz".indexOf(a) != -1)
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One really nice way to do something like this is to use ASCII values, assuming your actual case here is where a is a char or a single character string. Convert a to its ASCII integer equivalent, then use something like this:

If you want to check that a is either "t", "u", "v", ... , "z", then do.....

If (val >= 116 && val <= 122) {//code here}

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I prefer to use regexp like few guys wrote upper. But also you can use next code

private boolean isOneMoreEquals(Object arg, Object... conditions) {
    if (conditions == null || arg == null) {
        return false;
    }
    for (int i = 0, d = conditions.length; i < d; i++) {
        if (arg.equals(conditions[i])) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

so your code will be next:

if (isOneMoreEquals(a, "x", "y", "z") {
    //do something
}
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Assuming that your "x", "y", and "z" can be of arbitrary length, you can use

if (0 <= java.util.Arrays.binarySearch(new String[] { "x", "y", "z" }, a)) {
    // Do something
}

Just make sure that you list your items in lexicographic order, as required by binarySearch(). That should be compatible all the way back to Java 1.2, and it should be more efficient than the solutions that use Java Collections.

Of course, if your "x", "y", and "z" are all single characters, and a is also a character, you can use if (0 <= "xyz".indexOf(a)) { ... } or

switch (a) {
  case 'x': case 'y': case 'z':
    // Do something
}
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Why would this be more efficient than a hash set collection? Binary search is O(log n) while Searching in a hash set is O(1). (Of course in both cases creating the collection would be at least O(n)) –  Taemyr Jan 7 at 8:56
    
@Taemyr For small inputs, Big-O analysis is misleading, as overhead costs dominate. The cost of creating a HashSet<String> may not be worthwhile. –  200_success Jan 7 at 9:41
    
Yes. But is the init cost of the collection much worse than the set up for the Array? –  Taemyr Jan 7 at 10:23
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If x,y,z... is Consecutive, you can use if(a >= 'x' && a <= '...'), if not, you can use ArrayList or just Arrays.

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I think that cleanest and fastest way is to put values in array.

String[] values={"value1","value2","value3"};
for (string value : values) {
    if (a.equals(value){
        //Some code
    }
}
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