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I have a standalone application that creates many threads for performing various transactions with one of our servers. One of those threads polls the server on given time intervals. I have put Thread.Sleep(user_supplied_time_interval) for making poller thread wait for given time interval before next polling attempt. Now during closing application I want to Abort() all the threads. For this I am keeping reference to the poller thread in the parentThread and calling pollerThread.Abort(); pollerThread.Join(); inparentThread. However I have come to know that I cannot abort slept thread. So I am getting System.Threading.ThreadAbortException on line Thread.Sleep(user_supplied_time_interval). I can obviously set some boolean to reflect that poller is intended to be stopped and check that boolean once threads comes out of sleeping state. However this will also prolong the application exit if the polling interval is long, since the poller will return only after coming out of sleeping state.

What is standard solution/approach to this problem? Or should I just catch System.Threading.ThreadAbortException separately and ignore it.

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2  
Sleep is evil. –  Tyymo Jan 6 at 15:03
1  
Use Timer instead of Sleep. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Jan 6 at 15:03
    
@HamletHakobyan like? short example please. Doesnt it will consume CPU cycles? –  Mahesha999 Jan 6 at 15:04
2  
@MathewFoscarini There's lots of bad production code out there. If you want to run some code after a given interval of time the appropriate tool is a Timer, rather than creating lots of threads just to have them sit around sleeping. –  Servy Jan 6 at 15:30
1  
You should not use Sleep or Abort in production code without a careful justification; both are highly indicative of inefficient and dangerously broken code. Threads are expensive; don't hire workers and then pay them to sleep. And thread aborting is one of the most dangerous things you can do. Write your code so that threads are under control at all times. If a thread is done its work, return it to the pool and schedule more work on another thread later rather than putting a thread to sleep. Use cancellation tokens rather than aborting. –  Eric Lippert Jan 6 at 16:02

5 Answers 5

I would strongly suggest using the Reactive Extensions Framework (Rx) for this kind of setup. Create an observable based on intervals. When you no longer need to poll you can dispose the subscription and the framework will clean up for you.

Have a look at this example, it should get you on your way: http://rxwiki.wikidot.com/101samples#toc28

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In your class that manages a thread add this property.

    /// <summary>
    /// Used to tell the thread to exit.
    /// </summary>
    private readonly AutoResetEvent _eventDelay;

    /// <summary>
    /// True if the worker thread is running.
    /// </summary>
    private bool _isRunning;

In the constructor initialize the event like this.

        _eventDelay = new AutoResetEvent(false);

Inside your worker thread when it needs to sleep you can pause it's execution like this.

        _isRunning = true;
        while(_isRunning)
        {
            // do thread work stuff

            if(!_isRunning)
            {
                continue;
            }
            TimeSpan delay = // calculate how long the thread should sleep
            _eventDelay.WaitOne(delay);
        }

You can now have a ShutDown method for your worker class. Note, it will not stop the thread until it has finished one iteration of work.

    /// <summary>
    /// Flags the job to shutdown. It will stop execution
    /// as soon as possible.
    /// </summary>
    public void ShutDown()
    {
        if (!_isRunning)
        {
            return;
        }

        _isRunning = false;
        _eventDelay.Set();
    }
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You should avoid Thread.Abort at all cost, it can cause all sort of strange things to happen.

You can just use a ManualRestEvent instead, waiting on an event with a timeout is very similar to Sleep and you can wake the tread up at any time with ManualRestEvent.Set.

You can even use the same event for all threads and it doubles as your quit flag.

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There is also AutoResetEvent if you want exclusive access to a resource. As mentioned, you should avoid Thread.Abort. Threads should exit by completion (whether success, cancellation, or exception), or stay in a loop if they are long-running. –  SiLo Jan 6 at 15:48

Timer Example: Timer will run every 2 seconds

Timer t = new Timer(TimerCallback, null, 0, 2000);

private void TimerCallback(Object o) 
{
   //Run some code here   
}
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Thread.Abort is not a good idea.

Set your threads to work in background:

pollerThread.IsBackground = true;

Background threads are identical to foreground threads, except that background threads do not prevent a process from terminating.

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