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I hope that this is the right place to ask (if not please tell me). I am currently trying to create a game while following Robert C. Martins book "Clean Code" in an effort to improve the readability of my code. I am not totally happy with how many of my functions work however, as more often than not I will need to check various variables before I execute a command. For example:

private void checkScoreAndIncreaseDifficulty() {
    if(eater.getScore()%400==0){
        world.increaseDifficulty();
    }

According to the book I am following functions should only do one thing, but when an "if" statement is involved the functions purpose (to me) seems to naturally increase. The name of the above function is checkScoreAndIncreaseDifficulty which is quite clearly two things but I cannot think of how to reduce it. I feel the solution is very simple but it just is not coming to me. Any advice would be appreciated.

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This is complex with no really right answer, but my complaint with your function name is that it's telling me what the function does, not what it is supposed to do. It's like a bad comment. Without more code it's hard to provide specific advice though. –  Speed8ump Jan 6 at 15:20
    
@Speed8ump Yes my function name is not nice at all. Even worse is that this style is repeated through my code, would you just ignore the "if" statement and just call it increaseDifficulty()? I feel that this is then slightly misleading if I do. This is my main problem. –  Colin Jan 6 at 15:40
    
I would use a name like updateDifficulty, or manageDifficultyIncrease. Ask yourself this: will you ever decrease the difficulty level? If so would that be in this same function? –  Speed8ump Jan 6 at 15:50
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6 Answers

Names of functions are supposed to describe what the function does,not how achieves something. So naming checkScoreAndIncreaseDifficulty is wrong imo. It should be something similar to IncreaseDifficulty. Moreover if you do not feel that names of your code elements do not give enough insight on what the function / class/ variable does, you can always comment your code. :)

Also, the "correct" place to write your conditional statement depends entirely on your application : if difficulty will increase only if the user satisfies some condition, then that condition should be included in the function that increases difficulty. If the difficulty might be increased by other means, then the function should only execute actions that increase difficulty and leave the decision whether to increase difficulty or not to the caller.

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Thank you for mentioning the correct place for the conditional. I had never thought about it until now and will most likely have to change my code. Also I agree about the naming. –  Colin Jan 6 at 15:53
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I don't see any way to make this method cleaner than it is. It checks the score, and then hands of the increaseDifficulty to another method. What more can you ask?

I think there's also a risk in trying to make methods as minimal as they can possibly be. At some point, you need to dig through a dozen methods and functions spread through your entire codebase in order to understand what a single method or function does. That's no good either.

As far as I'm concerned, your code hits the sweet spot. The cumbersome name is indeed an issue, but not a serious one, and easy enough to fix, if you really want to.

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Why don't you use two separate functions(you can do it also with only first function) like this:

 private bool isScoreEnough() {
  if(eater.getScore()%400==0)
     return true;
 }
 private void increaseDifficulty(){

    world.increaseDifficulty();
 }

and in your program:

 if(isScoreEnough())
    increaseDifficulty();
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You are setting difficulty level in the function. Depending on score you increase/decrease the difficulty level. That is perfectly fine - as long as the function does the job of determining and setting difficulty level only. Function name has scope for improvement:

private void setDifficultyLevel() {
    if (eater.getScore()%400 == 0) {
        world.increaseDifficulty();
    }
}
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Yes I too want to change my function name. But in your above code the setDifficultyLevel() function does not actually set the difficulty level at times. Which is slightly misleading I would have thought? But I cannot see any nicer way of writing it. –  Colin Jan 6 at 15:37
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Obviously you won't find much code without any if statement, programs have to make decisions based on state, input or whatever. Avoiding if statements at all is also not the key message of "Clean Code". What you should avoid are for example endless if-else constructs if one class does the work of three logical cases - you should have three classes then.

Your method is already pretty short, but if you want to apply one of Martin's principles (a good name spares comments etc.) even further you could use something like:

if (scoreRequiresIncreaseInDifficulty()) {
  increaseDifficulaty();
}

and then implement the two methods. However, I don't think this makes much sense in your case unless you will need the same calls multiple times and want to maintain the flexibility to change when the score requires a more difficult game in a single place.

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You want to increase difficulty every 400 score points gathered by the eater, right?

So, you would need the eater to allow subscribing for score changes:

interface Eater {
 void addScoreChangedListener(ScoreChangedListener listener);
}

interface ScoreChangedListener {
 public void onScoreChanged(Score previousScore, Score newScore);
}

The implementation of Eater would hold a list of all score change listeners and invoke the onScoreChanged on each of them when the score changes. See the Observer pattern.

And then when bootstrapping your game:

Eater eater = ....
eater.addScorechangedListener(new DifficultyAdjustScoreChangeListener());

And you are done!

The implementation of DifficultyAdjustScoreChangeListener need to have the if, though, but that's ok:

class DifficultyAdjustScoreChangeListener implements ScoreChangedListener {
 public void onScoreChanged(Score previousScore, Score newScore) {
  if (newScore.value() % 400 == 0) {
   world.increaseDifficulty();
  }
 }
}
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