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I can't quite get my head around trying to figure this out but I'll explain as follows,

var combinedCoords = new List<List<int>>();

var coords = new List<List<int>>
{
    new List<int>() {0, 1},
    new List<int>() {0, 1, 2},
    new List<int>() {1, 3, 4, 5},
    new List<int>() {3, 4},
    new List<int>() {7, 8},
    new List<int>() {7, 8, 9},
    new List<int>() {8, 9, 10}
};

Here I have the var coords which contains some List<int>; what I need is for some new lists to be populated inside combinedCoords which will contain some combined lists where there are numbers in common. From this there should be 2 combined lists produced, the first will be {0,1,2,3,4,5} and the second will be {7,8,9,10}. To further illustrate what I'm trying to say, below is a graphical representation were each circle is a list; the red number in brackets denotes the index of each list.

how it should look

share|improve this question
2  
What would happen if you add 1 to your {8,9,10} list, e.g. {1,8,9,10}? would the result be a single combined list with all distinct numbers? – Adolfo Perez Jan 6 '14 at 16:10
    
Yes they would all be connected either directly or indirectly, so yes combinedCoords would contain 1 list {0,1,2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10} – chillydk147 Jan 6 '14 at 16:16
    
I think there is an error with your diagram. Circle 3 should include 4 in it. {3,4} – Adolfo Perez Jan 6 '14 at 16:19
    
Thanks I can see that is an error – chillydk147 Jan 6 '14 at 16:22
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It looks like what you're looking for is a connected component list. I answered a similar question about this here, but this question is different enough that I think it warrants it's own answer:

var combinedCoords = new List<List<int>>();
foreach(var c in coords)
{
    var merge = new List<List<int>>();
    foreach(var g in combinedCoords)
    {
        if (c.Any(g.Contains))
        {
            merge.Add(g);
        }
    }

    if (merge.Count == 0)
    {
        combinedCoords.Add(c);
    }

    merge.Add(c);
    for(int i = 1; i < merge.Count; i ++)
    {
        foreach(var v in merge[i].Except(merge[0]))
        {
            merge[0].Add(v);
        }

        combinedCoords.Remove(merge[i]);
    }
}

This produces two lists:

{ 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }
{ 7, 8, 9, 10 }

If you refactor coords and combinedCoords to be a List<HashSet<int>>, the algorithm is a little simpler, and it should perform better:

var combinedCoords = new List<HashSet<int>>();
foreach(var c in coords)
{
    var merge = new List<HashSet<int>>(combinedCoords.Where(c.Overlaps));
    if (merge.Count == 0)
    {
        combinedCoords.Add(c);
    }
    else
    {
        merge[0].UnionWith(c);
        for(int i = 1; i < merge.Count; i ++)
        {
            merge[0].UnionWith(merge[i]);
            combinedCoords.Remove(merge[i]);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works also, although the Dump() method is not recognized on my VS2010 – chillydk147 Jan 6 '14 at 16:30
    
@user3165925 Sorry, that was left over from my tests in LINQPad. – p.s.w.g Jan 6 '14 at 16:31
    
So does this refactoring affect performance as I'd prefer the code to run faster rather than have less code? – chillydk147 Jan 6 '14 at 16:38
    
Yes, using HashSet<int> this code should definitely run faster. But I'm not sure what other code you've got or where else coords is used, so I can't say that it would be faster in all cases. – p.s.w.g Jan 6 '14 at 16:41
    
@user3165925 BTW, I just did a quick benchmark. It appears the HashSet solution is almost twice as fast as the List solution. If this is a performance critical part of the application, I'd definitely recommend trying the HashSet solution. – p.s.w.g Jan 6 '14 at 16:58

Something like this should finish up with coords containing just the 'linked' values, based on what I believe is your requirement that any two lists with shared values should be combined into one list:

        bool combinedAny;
        do
        {
            combinedAny = false;
            for (int i = 0; i < coords.Count; i++)
            {
                for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
                {
                    if (coords[i].Intersect(coords[j]).Any())
                    {
                        coords[j] = coords[i].Union(coords[j]).ToList();
                        coords.RemoveAt(i);
                        combinedAny = true;
                        break;
                    }
                }

                if (combinedAny)
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        while (combinedAny);
share|improve this answer
1  
Cool that worked great, thanks Jon G – chillydk147 Jan 6 '14 at 16:27

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