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I'm implementing a user-space firewall using the netfilter queue library. I got a file descriptor for the queue using nfq_fd() so I can call recv(fd, recv_buf, BUFFERSIZE, MSG_DONTWAIT) to get packet data without blocking. But sometimes recv() starts returning 52-byte packets every time I call it. If I check the output of iptables -nvL INPUT the number of packets doesn't increase, so they're not actually being sent from the network. Edit3: nfq_handle_packet() returns -1 when I pass it one of these odd packets, and it never triggers the callback function, so I have no way to get a packet id or return a verdict.

Why is recv() giving me these odd packets?

Edit1:

The packets aren't all identical but they have a similar structure. There are also some repeats. Here's a hexdump of a few of them:

0000   34 00 00 00 02 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 BE 4E 00 00   4............N..
0010   FE FF FF FF 20 00 00 00  01 03 01 00 00 00 00 00   .... ...........
0020   00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  0C 00 02 00 00 00 00 01   ................
0030   01 00 00 00                                        ....

0000   34 00 00 00 02 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 5B 69 00 00   4...........[i..
0010   FE FF FF FF 20 00 00 00  01 03 01 00 00 00 00 00   .... ...........
0020   00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  0C 00 02 00 00 00 00 01   ................
0030   00 00 01 95                                        ....

0000   34 00 00 00 02 00 00 00  00 00 00 00 5B 69 00 00   4...........[i..
0010   FE FF FF FF 20 00 00 00  01 03 01 00 00 00 00 00   .... ...........
0020   00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  0C 00 02 00 00 00 00 01   ................
0030   00 00 01 95                                        ....

Edit2:

The code is pretty rudimentary, it's just tweaked from a few netfilter_queue tutorials I found.

#include <linux/netfilter.h>
#include <libnetfilter_queue/libnetfilter_queue.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <syslog.h>

#define BUFFERSIZE 500

int main()
{
   struct nfq_handle *h;
   struct nfq_q_handle *qh;
   struct my_nfq_data msg;
   int fd;
   unsigned char recv_buf[BUFFERSIZE];
   int action;

   if ((stat("/proc/net/netfilter/nfnetlink_queue", &fbuf) < 0) && (errno == ENOENT))
     {
        fprintf(stderr, "Please make sure nfnetlink_queue is installed, or that you have\ncompiled a kernel with the Netfilter QUEUE target built in.\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
     }

   openlog("packetbl", LOG_PID, "local6");

   if ((h = nfq_open()) == 0)
     {    
        syslog(LOG_ERR, "Couldn't open netlink connection: %s", strerror(errno));
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
     }    

   nfq_unbind_pf(h, AF_INET);
   if ((nfq_bind_pf(h, AF_INET) < 0))
     {    
        syslog(LOG_ERR, "Couldn't bind to IPv4: %s", strerror(errno));
     }    

   nfq_unbind_pf(h, AF_INET6);
   if ((nfq_bind_pf(h, AF_INET6) < 0))
     {    
        syslog(LOG_ERR, "Couldn't bind to IPv6: %s", strerror(errno));
     }    

   if ((qh = nfq_create_queue(h, 0, &callback, &msg)) == NULL)
     {    
        syslog(LOG_ERR, "Couldn't create nfq: %s", strerror(errno));
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
     }    

   if ((nfq_set_mode(qh, NFQNL_COPY_PACKET, BUFFERSIZE)) == -1)
     {    
        syslog(LOG_ERR, "nfq_set_mode error: %s", strerror(errno));
        if (errno == 111) 
          {    
             syslog(LOG_ERR, "try loading the nfnetlink_queue module");
          }    
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
     }    

   fd = nfq_fd(h);

   while(1)
     {

        /* Up here I print some statistics on packets allowed and blocked.
           It prints on a schedule, so the recv() call has to be non-blocking
           or else the statistics would only print out when there's a packet. */

        recv_return_code = recv(fd, recv_buf, BUFFERSIZE, MSG_DONTWAIT); //nonblocking

        if (recv_return_code < 0)
          {
            if (errno == EAGAIN ||
                errno == EWOULDBLOCK)
              {
                nanosleep(&times,NULL);
              }
            else
              {
                syslog(LOG_ERR, "recv failed: %s", strerror(errno));
              }
            continue;
          }

        printf("received %d bytes\n", recv_return_code);

        /* when nfq_handle_packet() succeeds, it triggers the callback
           which puts the packet data into a global variable "msg" */
        if (nfq_handle_packet(h, recv_buf, recv_return_code) != 0)
          {
            syslog(LOG_ERR, "couldn't handle packet");
          }

        action = packet_check_ip(msg);

        pbl_set_verdict(qh, ntohl(msg.header.packet_id), action);
     }
}

Edit 4:

I'm using scapy as a traffic generator. If I send only one packet at a time, then I get 0 or 1 bogus packets and then it stops. Here's the output from strace:

recvfrom(3, "x\0\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\n\0\0\0\v\0\1\0\0\0\0\6\206\335\1\0\10\0\5\0\0\0\0\2\20\0\t\0\0\6\261\201\0\f)7Z\22\0\0@\0\n\0`\0\0\0\0\24\6@&\6\364\0\10\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0p\5&\6\364\0\10\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0p\4\0\24\0\31\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0P\2 \0k\236\0\0", 9216, MSG_DONTWAIT, NULL, NULL) = 120
sendto(4, "<182>Jan 13 10:51:20 packetbl[8785]: [Found in cache (accept)] [2606:f400:800::7005,20,25]", 90, MSG_NOSIGNAL, NULL, 0) = 90
sendmsg(3, {msg_name(12)={sa_family=AF_NETLINK, pid=0, groups=00000000}, msg_iov(1)=[{" \0\0\0\1\3\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\f\0\2\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\6", 32}], msg_controllen=0, msg_flags=0}, 0) = 32
recvfrom(3, "x\0\0\0\0\3\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\n\0\0\0\v\0\1\0\0\0\0\7\206\335\1\0\10\0\5\0\0\0\0\2\20\0\t\0\0\6\261\201\0\f)7Z\22\0\0@\0\n\0`\0\0\0\0\24\6@&\6\364\0\10\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0p\1&\6\364\0\10\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0p\4\0\24\0\31\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0P\2 \0k\242\0\0", 9216, MSG_DONTWAIT, NULL, NULL) = 120
futex(0x60c984, FUTEX_CMP_REQUEUE_PRIVATE, 1, 2147483647, 0x607fc0, 8) = 2
futex(0x607fc0, FUTEX_WAKE_PRIVATE, 1)  = 1
sendmsg(3, {msg_name(12)={sa_family=AF_NETLINK, pid=0, groups=00000000}, msg_iov(1)=[{" \0\0\0\1\3\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\f\0\2\0\0\0\0\1\7\0\0\0", 32}], msg_controllen=0, msg_flags=0}, 0) = 32
recvfrom(3, "4\0\0\0\2\0\0\0\0\0\0\0Q\"\0\0\376\377\377\377 \0\0\0\1\3\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\f\0\2\0\0\0\0\1\7\0\0\0", 9216, MSG_DONTWAIT, NULL, NULL) = 52
sendto(4, "<179>Jan 13 10:51:22 packetbl[8785]: couldn't handle packet", 59, MSG_NOSIGNAL, NULL, 0) = 59
sendmsg(3, {msg_name(12)={sa_family=AF_NETLINK, pid=0, groups=00000000}, msg_iov(1)=[{" \0\0\0\1\3\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\f\0\2\0\0\0\0\1\0\0\0\7", 32}], msg_controllen=0, msg_flags=0}, 0) = 32

I can send individual packets as fast as I can twiddle my fingers and it never goes into a death spiral. But if I have scapy send 4 packets at once it sometimes triggers one (or zero) bogus packets for each real packet, but other times I receive infinite bogus packets. If I send lots of packets it always goes infinite.

I had seen some of this behavior before but Nominal Animal's answer jogged my memory. One odd thing about my code as shown above is that I still do packet_check_ip() and pbl_set_verdict() even if nfq_handle_packet() fails. I thought it would make sense to put a continue; in that case, because otherwise I'm processing stale data in the msg variable. (Correct me if I'm wrong, but that should have the same effect as moving the packet processing and verdict into the callback.) But that consistently sets off an infinity of bogus packets after even 1 real packet. I also moved the verdict into the callback temporarily and it didn't change anything.

So somehow, calling set_verdict on old data sometimes prevents the infinity?

Oh and here's the code for pbl_set_verdict() if anyone was worried that it might be doing anything clever :)

static void pbl_set_verdict(struct nfq_q_handle *qh,
                            uint32_t id,
                            unsigned int verdict)
{  
   nfq_set_verdict(qh, id, verdict, 0, NULL);
}

Edit 5:

I've compiled and run the nfqnl_test.c example that is distributed with libnetfilter_queue, and it runs just fine. So it's probably not an issue with the library itself.

Edit 6:

Now I'm getting somewhere :) It turns out, in an over-capacity condition, ntohl() was being called twice! And because I was calling pbl_set_verdict() on the stale data even when nfq_handle_packet failed, it ran the data through properly which had the right effect. That's why the queue filled up when I moved the pbl_set_verdict() call into the callback function - it never got a chance to fix the problem caused by the over-capacity condition. And the stale data only included some of the packets processed, so a bunch of them would fill the queue eventually anyway.

Even though my program works now, I'm still baffled about what these packets are and why they don't seem to be documented.

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried printing out the packet? Are they all identical? –  Chris J. Kiick Jan 8 at 22:21
1  
In Wireshark you dont see those packets? TCP/UDP? What those packets contents? Each one is different? –  MeNa Jan 9 at 0:14
1  
My pulled-out-of-my-backside wild guess is that you've neglected to set the verdict on some of the received packets in your callback function, and the kernel is freaking out, running out of buffers maybe -- I'm probably mistaken, but I think the kernel might be resending only the packet ID in a config message instead of the entire packet. For a real answer, we need detailed information and enough code to reproduce the issue. Otherwise we're all just wasting our time. At minimum, a hex dump of a few such packets, and key code lines, are needed. –  Nominal Animal Jan 9 at 1:44
    
Crosspost? –  Jonas Wielicki Jan 9 at 14:43
    
Yes, it's a crosspost. I've have a few versions of this question on SO for over a week with no answer, so I sent it to the mailing list as well. –  sep332 Jan 9 at 15:22

1 Answer 1

Compare your code to the example at libnetfilter_queue sources. Your code sets the verdict (assuming that's what pbl_set_verdict() in your code does) after the packet is processed. The example sets the verdict in the callback function.

I'm not confident enough in netfilter innards to say for certain this is the root cause of your problem, but I do believe it is.

As to using nonblocking reads, there is no need for that. Instead, have an interval timer fire a signal (say, HUP or a realtime signal like SIGRTMIN+1) at regular intervals, and install an empty signal handler function for that signal. When the signal is delivered (to the empty-body handler; IGN or DFL won't work), this causes any blocking I/O calls to be interrupted, assuming your process only has a single thread. Using HUP is useful if the interval is long, because then the user can send HUP externally to cause the statistics to be printed immediately. No extra CPU time is wasted this way.

If your application uses multiple threads, you need a bit more machinery. The handler needs to check if the source is a timer interrupt (siginfo->si_code==SI_TIMER), and if so, forward the interrupt (same signal) to the target thread(s) using pthread_sigqueue() unless the current thread is a target thread. The thread(s) that read messages via netlink then need to save their thread IDs to somewhere the interrupt handler can access them. (Also, your other code must then be aware that errno==EINTR may occur, and is not an error, unless they specifically block the signal.)

In other words, I'd expect your code to instead be more like

/* In case of an error, break out of the following loop.
 * You can either exit, or close and re-establish the netlink
 * and queue.
*/
while(1)
{
    ssize_t bytes;

    /* Read a new netlink message.
       Note: Technically, BUFFERSIZE should be about 65536,
             since each message has a uint16_t message length field.
    */
    bytes = recv(fd, recv_buf, BUFFERSIZE, MSG_DONTWAIT);

    /* C library, or kernel recv() bug?
    */
    if (bytes < (ssize_t)-1 || bytes > (ssize_t)BUFFERSIZE) {
        errno = EIO;
        break; /* out of the while (1) loop */
    }

    /* Netlink closed? Should not occur. */
    if (bytes == (ssize_t)0) {
        errno = 0;
        break; /* No error, just netlink closed. Drop out. */
    }

    /* No message? */
    if (bytes == (ssize_t)-1) {
        if (errno == EINTR || errno == EAGAIN || errno == EWOULDBLOCK) {

            /* Print overall statistics.
            */

            continue;
        } else
            break; /* Other errors drop out of the loop. */
    }

    if (nfq_handle_packet(h, recv_buf, bytes)) {
        /* Packet was dropped on the floor.
         * This is a serious problem, so we treat this as EIO.
        */
        errno = EIO;
        break;
    }
}

with the callback being basically

static int callback(struct nfq_q_handle *qh,
                    struct nfgenmsg *nfmsg,
                    struct nfq_data *nfa,
                    void *data)
{
    return nfq_set_verdict(qh, id, packet_check_ip(nfmsg), 0, NULL);
}

As to multithreading the above, you can simply have multiple threads run the above loop simultaneously (with different recv_buf buffers, obviously). Then, the thread that receives a packet, also handles it, including the callback. There should be no issues with thread-safety, unless your own code is non-thread-safe. You could also add a check (for some global volatile flag) if the thread should exit, just before the "Print overall statistics" comment inside the if clause; then you can simply set the flag, and send the signal to update the statistics, to have all worker threads quit, without dropping any packets "on the floor".

Any questions?

share|improve this answer
    
I generally try to avoid mixing signals and threads :) I have multiple "worker" threads but only one reading from the queue. If this project wasn't complex enough already I'd move the stats to their own thread and let recv() block all it wants. Someday maybe! –  sep332 Jan 11 at 16:57
    
I don't mean to ignore your answer but I tried moving nfq_set_verdict() into the callback and ran into some very strange behavior. I'm trying to find a good test case and then I'll write up the results. –  sep332 Jan 11 at 16:59
    
@sep332: If you do not increase BUFFERSIZE to at least 1600 or so (1500 for Ethernet frame, plus some for the netfilter stuff), I expect you do run in to very strange behaviour indeed. You see, the MTU (maximum transmission unit) is 1500 for normal Ethernet packets, and up to 9216 for jumbo frames. For TCP/IP and UDP/IP, the stack rebuilds fragmented packets, so a single netfilter message can be much larger. Thus, I recommend setting BUFFERSIZE=65536, and see if that takes care of the strange behaviour you saw. The verdict definitely belongs in the callback; think about it if you disagree. –  Nominal Animal Jan 11 at 22:35
    
I've run the program in strace and never seen recv() return more than 120 bytes. iptables is only sending it SYN packets after all. It's not a bad idea, though. I've bumped BUFFERSIZE but it didn't have any effect on the behavior. –  sep332 Jan 13 at 16:57
    
@sep332: Have you run the upstream example (linked at the start of my answer)? It is not inconceivable there are multiple issues here. Best to eliminate as many sources as we can, one by one. If the canonical example works, then the kernel/library side is ok. Otherwise, the problem may not be in your code at all. –  Nominal Animal Jan 13 at 21:34

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