Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using AutoFixture, Moq, and XUnit extensions ([Theory] attribute) as described in this blog post http://blog.ploeh.dk/2010/10/08/AutoDataTheorieswithAutoFixture.

I've noticed that most of unit tests look like this:

[Theory, AutoMoqData]
public void Test(
    [Frozen] Mock<IServiceOne> serviceOne,
    [Frozen] Mock<IServiceTwo> serviceTwo,

    MyClass classUnderTest)
{
    // Arrange
    serviceOne
        .Setup(m => m.Get(It.IsAny<int>()));

    serviceTwo
        .Setup(m => m.Delete(It.IsAny<int>()));

    // MyClass has a constructor with arguments for IServiceOne, and IServiceTwo
    // classUnderTest will use the two mocks specified above

    // Act
    var result = classUnderTest.Foo();

    // Assert
    Assert.True(result);
}

As opposed to always decorating the mocks with [Frozen], is there a way to setup the fixture to always freeze mocks?

Here's the AutoMoqData attribute:

public class AutoMoqDataAttribute : AutoDataAttribute
{
    public AutoMoqDataAttribute()
        : base(new Fixture().Customize(new AutoMoqCustomization()))
    {
    }
}
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Although it's currently not built-in, it's easy to write a general purpose Decorator that freezes objects as they leave the AutoFixture Tree of Responsibility:

public class MemoizingBuilder : ISpecimenBuilder
{
    private readonly ISpecimenBuilder builder;
    private readonly ConcurrentDictionary<object, object> instances;

    public MemoizingBuilder(ISpecimenBuilder builder)
    {
        this.builder = builder;
        this.instances = new ConcurrentDictionary<object, object>();
    }

    public object Create(object request, ISpecimenContext context)
    {
        return this.instances.GetOrAdd(
            request,
            r => this.builder.Create(r, context));
    }
}

Notice that it Decorates another ISpecimenBuilder, but remembers all values before it returns them. If the same request arrives again, it'll return the memoized value.

While you can't extend AutoMoqCustomization, you can replicate what it does (it's only two lines of code), and use the MemoizingBuilder around it:

public class AutoFreezeMoq : ICustomization
{
    public void Customize(IFixture fixture)
    {
        if (fixture == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("fixture");

        fixture.Customizations.Add(
            new MemoizingBuilder(
                new MockPostprocessor(
                    new MethodInvoker(
                        new MockConstructorQuery()))));
        fixture.ResidueCollectors.Add(new MockRelay());
    }
}

Use this AutoFreezeMoq instead of AutoMoqCustomization. It will freeze all mocks, and all interfaces and abstract base classes created from those mocks.

public class AutoMoqDataAttribute : AutoDataAttribute
{
    public AutoMoqDataAttribute()
        : base(new Fixture().Customize(new AutoFreezeMoq()))
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Could you create one for NSubstitute? I'm currently evaluating using that over Moq. Here's my attempt: fixture.Customizations.Add( new MemoizingBuilder( new NSubstituteBuilder( new MethodInvoker( new NSubstituteMethodQuery())))); –  Omar Jan 7 at 16:13
1  
Looking at AutoNSubstituteCustomization, I think you need to add it to fixture.ResidueCollectors instead of fixture.Customizations, but otherwise it looks right. I haven't tested it, though. Does it work? –  Mark Seemann Jan 7 at 16:25
    
It worked when I added it either fixture.ResidueCollectors or fixture.Customizations. Not sure why though. –  Omar Jan 7 at 16:57
    
I noticed that for the NSubstitute setup in my comment, I still need to use [Frozen] on concrete classes to get the correct reference. Any idea why that is or if it's possible to have it freeze for concrete classes too? –  Omar Jan 10 at 17:03
    
IIRC, none of the Auto-mocking extensions mock concrete classes. This is by design. This post explains it in the context of AutoMoq, but AutoNSubstitute ought to be consistent with that behaviour too: blog.ploeh.dk/2010/08/25/… –  Mark Seemann Jan 10 at 21:59
show 1 more comment

I ended up copying code from the AutoDataAttribute class and modifying it to include a FreezingCustomization.

This is the resulting attribute.

public class AutoMoqDataAttribute : AutoDataAttribute
{
    public AutoMoqDataAttribute()
        : base(new Fixture().Customize(new AutoMoqCustomization()))
    {
    }

    public override IEnumerable<object[]> GetData(System.Reflection.MethodInfo methodUnderTest, Type[] parameterTypes)
    {
        var specimens = new List<object>();
        foreach (var p in methodUnderTest.GetParameters())
        {
            CustomizeFixture(p);
            if (p.ParameterType.GetInterfaces().Any(t => t.IsGenericType && t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IMock<>)))
            {
                var freeze = new FreezingCustomization(p.ParameterType, p.ParameterType);
                this.Fixture.Customize(freeze);
            }
            var specimen = Resolve(p);
            specimens.Add(specimen);
        }

        return new[] { specimens.ToArray() };
    }

    private void CustomizeFixture(ParameterInfo p)
    {
        var dummy = false;
        var customizeAttributes = p.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(CustomizeAttribute), dummy).OfType<CustomizeAttribute>();
        foreach (var ca in customizeAttributes)
        {
            var c = ca.GetCustomization(p);
            this.Fixture.Customize(c);
        }
    }

    private object Resolve(ParameterInfo p)
    {
        var context = new SpecimenContext(this.Fixture);
        return context.Resolve(p);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.