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I have a client and server code. When user types a wrong command on client, like run cat, the server displays an exec error (no such file or directory). I want to write this message to sock so that the client displays it.

Here is a snippet from my server code:

     pd = fork();

       if(pd < 0)
    perror("Fork Error");

       if(pd != 0)
       {
    strcpy(sp[i].pname, param) ;
    sp[i].pdd = pd;
    sp[i].active = 1;
    i++;
    if(sp[i].active==1){
    write(sock, "Done", sizeof("Done"));
    }

       }

     if(pd == 0)
     {
       if(execlp(param, NULL) < 0);
       {
    perror("Exec error: ");
         exit(20);
       }
     }
   }
   else write(sock, "Invalid", sizeof("Invalid"));
   }
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3  
Use strerror(errno). –  ikegami Jan 6 '14 at 18:03
    
This snippet doesn't really makes sense. Also you might like to fix the indentation. –  alk Jan 6 '14 at 18:17
    
@alk sorry about that. I am new here. –  user3015353 Jan 6 '14 at 18:24

1 Answer 1

You have two relatively painless options.

The first just formats the error string with strerror.

    char buffer[200];

    if (execlp(param, NULL) < 0)
    {
        len = snprintf(buffer, sizeof(buffer), "execlp failed %s\n", strerror(errno));

        write(sock, buffer, len);

        // do something
    }

The second is a Glibc extension to the printf family. %m literally does strerror(errno) on its own and you don't even need to provide errno as an argument. Same outcome, a little more convenient.

    if (execlp(param, NULL) < 0)
    {
        int len = snprintf(buffer, sizeof(buffer), "execlp failed %m\n");

        write(sock, buffer, len);

        // do something
    }

Note that this assumes you are delimiting messages with newlines. If you are using some other message scheme you may have to prefix the message with its length or whatnot. (And, as always, socket read/writes should be done in a loop to ensure the whole message gets transmitted.)

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for the explanation and help. –  user3015353 Jan 6 '14 at 18:51

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