Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a java file in which I wrote /t, instead of \t, the proper notation of the tab escape function. I want to use vim’s substitution feature (:s) but when I do something like this:

:%s//t/\t/g

I get the error message E488: Trailing characters

How can I write the command such that I can execute the substitution? Thank you.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use backslash to escape the characters. So:

:%s/\/t/\\t\g

You can also use a different delimiter like:

:%s@/t@\\t@g
share|improve this answer
2  
I think you mean :%s@/t@\\t@g for the second version. –  benjifisher Jan 6 '14 at 18:11
    
You're right; thanks! Edited. –  alabount Jan 6 '14 at 18:31
    
Thank you! One more question: what is the difference between backslash () and the @ delimiters? –  John J. Kim Jan 6 '14 at 18:36
    
@JohnJ.Kim Vim lets you use any single-byte character as long as it's not alphanumeric as the delimiter in pattern replacement. It recognizes whatever comes after the 's' as your chosen delimiter. There's no difference in using one over the other, except that when you have to escape slashes, using something other than '\' makes it more readable/writable. –  alabount Jan 6 '14 at 18:50

Use colons instead of a slash to avoid confusions and errors if what you want to look-up/replace has slashes. This way VIM will be able to parse the sentence correctly.
Then you need to scape the back-slash otherwise VIM will replace /t with tabulations

:%s:/t:\\t:g
share|improve this answer

Escape the forward slash in your search pattern:

:%s/\/t/\\t/g

or use another separator:

:%s;/t;\\t;g
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.