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As a new Angular user, I've ran into a problem where I can't have multiple directives with isolated scopes on one single element.

I have since realised, I can use attrs.$observe on the directive's link method, rather than an isolated scope, to stay up-to-date on an attribute's value. I want to make sure I'm doing things the right way though.

When should I use an isolated scope and when should I use attrs.$observe? For example...

Isolated Scope

App.directive('tooltip', function() {
    return {
        scope: {
            tooltip: '@'
        },
        link: function(scope, element) {
                element.enableSomeTooltip({
                    content: function() {
                        return scope.tooltip;
                    }
                });
        }
    }
});

attrs.$observe()

App.directive('tooltip', function() {
    return {
        link: function(scope, element, attrs) {
            var tooltip;
            attrs.$observe('tooltip', function(newTooltip) {
                tooltip = newTooltip;
            });
            element.enableSomeTooltip({
                content: function() {
                    return tooltip;
                }
            });
        }
    }
});

Both of the above have the same end result, right? So which is the 'correct' or 'Angular' way of doing things. If they don't have the same end result, please explain so I can better understand. Thanks!

Edit: I suppose I can also access the attribute other ways, such as via the element. E.g. element.attr('tooltip'). In this particular case however, the attribute contains an expression which needs parsing, which is why I'm reviewing the two options above.

share|improve this question
    
The way you access the attribute is not the only question. In the first version you have created an isolated scope, in the second not and your directive has access to the full parent scope. IMHO the first way is right if you write a reusable component(directive). the second way is right if you write a directive that is bound to you application domain. why: in the first way you define explicitly what is visible in you directive, in the second way you have access to all information in the parent scope. would you agree? – michael Jan 6 '14 at 20:11
    
I guess I would agree with you @mseemann. It seems there are various different ways to do things, I was under the impression that Angular was a lot more opinionated. I guess there is a bit more flexibility than I thought, more decisions to make as the developer. – Mike Jan 6 '14 at 22:04
    
There are various ways, but usually only one correct way. I would agree with michael's assessment here. This tooltip is re-useable and therefore should have an isolated scope. Sounds like you have another directive, that also has an isolate scope on that same element. I would try to re-arrange your DOM to avoid that. Otherwise, you could consider baking the tooltip functionality into the other directive for that element only – Charlie Martin Jun 16 '14 at 17:18

I tend to use the isolated scope when making a reusable component that needs to bind data to its html template.

For example, if a directive is only calling some non-angular plugin (like Bootstrap or JQueryUI) and never creates an html template, there probably is not a lot of value in creating an isolate scope because attrs.$observe can grab an attribute's changed value and save the values to the directive's link closure without ever having to touch $scope.

HTML

 <div ng-controller="MyController as vm">
    <isolate-scope-directive message="vm.message"></isolate-scope-directive>
    <non-isolate-scope-directive message="{{vm.message}}"></non-isolate-scope-directive>
</div>

JS

angular.module('app').controller('MyController', function ($scope) {
    var vm = this;
    vm.message = 'Hello world';
    var i = 0;
    setInterval(function () {
        $scope.$apply(function () {
            vm.message = 'Hello world ' + i++;
        });
    }, 500);
});

angular.module('app').directive('isolateScopeDirective', function () {
    return {
        scope: {
            message: '='
        },
        link: function ($scope, element, attributes, controller) {},
        template: '<div>{{message}}</div>'
    };
});

angular.module('app').directive('nonIsolateScopeDirective', function () {
    return {
        link: function ($scope, element, attributes, controller) {
            attributes.$observe('message', function(newMessage){
                element.html(newMessage);
            });
        },
        template: '<div></div>'
    };
});

Here's a jsfiddle that shows this in action: http://jsfiddle.net/ow02cv5w/2/

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