Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some code below which is a simplified example of what I'm trying to do. I'm using a converter to try to fill a DataGrid with data from a model that I have. The DataGrid is being populated correctly, but any changes in the grid are not being persisted back to the objects. I have specified the mode as TwoWay. When I put a breakpoint on the converters ConvertBack method, it is never being called.

I am fairly new to WPF and MVVM, so I don't see what I'm doing wrong. There is not much I can do to change the model, so I'd like to see if this can work unless there is a clearly superior method.

XAML:

<Window x:Class="SampleBindingProblem.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:SampleBindingProblem"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="400" Width="500">
    <Window.Resources>
        <ResourceDictionary>
            <local:ScenarioDataTableConverter x:Key="ScenarioDataTableConverter" />
        </ResourceDictionary>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid>
        <ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding Scenarios}">
            <ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
                <DataTemplate>
                    <DataGrid Margin="5" ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Options, Mode=TwoWay, Converter={StaticResource ScenarioDataTableConverter}}" />
                </DataTemplate>
            </ItemsControl.ItemTemplate>
        </ListBox>
    </Grid>
</Window>

App.xaml.cs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Data;

namespace SampleBindingProblem
{
    public class ColumnInfo
    {
        public static readonly String[] ColumnLabels = new String[] { "Variable1", "Variable2", "Variable3", "Variable4", "Variable5" };
    }

    public class ScenarioOption
    {
        public String Label { get; set; }
        public String[] Variables { get; set; }
    }

    public class Scenario
    {
        public ScenarioOption[] Options { get; set; }
    }

    internal class ScenarioDataTableConverter : IValueConverter
    {
        public Object Convert (Object value, Type targetType, Object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            if (value == null)
                return (null);

            ScenarioOption[] options = (ScenarioOption[]) value;

            DataTable table = new DataTable();

            table.Columns.Add("Label", typeof(String));
            for (Int32 c = 0; c < ColumnInfo.ColumnLabels.Length; ++c)
                table.Columns.Add(ColumnInfo.ColumnLabels[c], typeof(String));
            foreach (ScenarioOption option in options)
            {
                DataRow row = table.NewRow();
                List<String> lst = new List<String>();
                lst.Add(option.Label);
                lst.AddRange(option.Variables);
                row.ItemArray = lst.ToArray();
                table.Rows.Add(row);
            }

            return (table.DefaultView);
        }

        public Object ConvertBack (Object value, Type targetType, Object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            return (null);
        }
    }

    internal class ViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        public void RaisePropertyChanged (String property)
        {
            if (this.PropertyChanged != null)
                this.PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(property));
        }

        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged = null;

        public ObservableCollection<Scenario> Scenarios { get; set; }

        public ViewModel ()
        {
            Scenario s1 = new Scenario();
            s1.Options = new ScenarioOption[] {
                new ScenarioOption() { Label = "Opt1", Variables=new String[] { "1", "2", "3", "4", "5" } },
                new ScenarioOption() { Label = "Opt2", Variables=new String[] { "2", "3", "4", "5", "6" } },
                new ScenarioOption() { Label = "Opt3", Variables=new String[] { "3", "4", "5", "6", "7" } },
            };
            Scenario s2 = new Scenario();
            s2.Options = new ScenarioOption[] {
                new ScenarioOption() { Label = "Opt1", Variables=new String[] { "1", "2", "3", "4", "5" } },
                new ScenarioOption() { Label = "Opt2", Variables=new String[] { "2", "3", "4", "5", "6" } },
                new ScenarioOption() { Label = "Opt3", Variables=new String[] { "3", "4", "5", "6", "7" } },
            };

            this.Scenarios = new ObservableCollection<Scenario>();
            this.Scenarios.Add(s1);
            this.Scenarios.Add(s2);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for App.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class App : Application
    {
        private void Application_Startup (Object sender, StartupEventArgs e)
        {
            MainWindow window = new MainWindow();
            window.DataContext = new ViewModel();
            window.ShowDialog();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The ConvertBack() method currently returns null because I haven't implemented it since it so far has not been called. –  Walter Williams Jan 6 at 21:51
add comment

2 Answers

Converters don't work that way when it comes to collections. ConvertBack will only be called when the entire collection is replaced. It won't be called when an item in the collection is modified. In your case the collection (the DataView) isn't being replaced with a new DataView instance, but rather modified, and that's why ConvertBack isn't being called.

If you ask me, I don't see why you need to use the converter anyway. Either bind directly to the Scenarios property and work on this collection that is exposed by the view model, or alternatively call the conversion code in your viewmodel and expose the resulting DataView in a different property. Then you'll just need to bind to that property without specifying a converter.

share|improve this answer
    
The ListBox is already bound to Scenarios as the view is to allow multiple scenarios to be worked on. It is the option collection within the scenario that I'm trying to get to the grid. So what you're saying is to implement a property in Scenario which gets/sets a DataView? –  Walter Williams Jan 6 at 22:29
    
That would probably be the easiest way to go. Just make sure you remove the converter. –  Adi Lester Jan 6 at 22:47
    
I've been playing with that and so far the behavior seems exactly the same. The setter on the DataView never gets called. –  Walter Williams Jan 6 at 22:50
    
And it's not supposed to. Just look in the values that it holds and see if they're the new ones. –  Adi Lester Jan 6 at 22:53
    
How are the model or the view model supposed to do that? –  Walter Williams Jan 6 at 22:55
show 5 more comments

This sounds like the classic beginner's mistake... I think that you need to implement the INotifyPropertyChanged Interface in your model classes. The idea is that you inform the INotifyPropertyChanged interface when any property value changes. From the linked page on MSDN:

public string CustomerName
{
    get
    {
        return this.customerNameValue;
    }
    set
    {
        if (value != this.customerNameValue)
        {
            this.customerNameValue = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged();
        }
    }
}

The UI can then be updated from the model class and the model class will be able to be updated from changes in the UI. See the linked page on MSDN for the full example.


Also, you don't need to declare a ResourceDictionary in the Window.Resources section... it is a ResourceDictionary:

<Window.Resources>
    <local:ScenarioDataTableConverter x:Key="ScenarioDataTableConverter" />
</Window.Resources>
share|improve this answer
    
INotifyPropertyChanged is for updating the UI. His problem is with the other way around - updating the objects from the UI. –  Adi Lester Jan 6 at 21:38
    
The ResourceDictionary is a relic of the simplification; there are other things in the real code. The model also are POCOs from a different assembly. I'd hope not to have to add that to the other assembly, but it could be possible to inherit the class and implement the interface. –  Walter Williams Jan 6 at 21:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.