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With the help of other SO-ers, I put together a smart quit macro for vim that asks if you really want to quit a file with changes. I tie this macro to F3 because I learned editors 30 years ago on a mainframe and F3 is Quit forevermore for me.

When I use tags and am looking at a file on the tagstack, I frequently goof by pressing F3 instead of ctrl-T to close that file. This closes all unchanged files tag file or otherwise.

So, I'd like to improve my smart quit macro to have it detect that the current file is on the tagstack and that I mean :pop, not :quit.

Is there a way to do this?

" Smart Quit Function ----------------------                                                                             
function! QuitF3()

  try
    quit
  catch /E37:/
    " Unwritten changes.
    echo "E37: Discard changes?  Y|y = Yes, N|n = No, W|w = Write"

    let ans = nr2char( getchar() )

    if      ans == "y" || ans == "Y"
      quit!
    elseif  ans == "w" || ans == "W"
      write
    else
      " Close prompt.
      call feedkeys('\<ESC>')
    endif
  endtry
endfunction
share|improve this question
1  
You would have to use :redirect to capture the contents of :tags as vim does not give you any functions to query the tagstack. However I feel that closing vim accidentally is a wonderful way to help you break your <f3> habit and help you switch over to <c-t>. –  Peter Rincker Jan 6 at 22:44
    
Well put! Good idea but fortunately almost all Eastern Orthodox editors (x2, e, e/pm, xedit, zed, ISPF,Visual SlickEdit, THE, kedit,...) still adhere to that convention. I use some of these and just breaking a 30+ year habit for vi will still make vi "wrong". How in the heck do you equate C-] with C-T anyway. Wouldn't C-[ and c-] or better C=] and C-SHIFT-] have made more sense? –  Wes Miller Jan 7 at 0:41
3  
Um....does this current function do anything that the 'confirm' option doesn't do for you? –  Ben Jan 7 at 2:19
    
The solution is simple: force yourself to stop goofing. Hitting <F3> instead of <C-t> is beyond goofing, though. –  romainl Jan 7 at 8:56
    
@Ben I don't know. This was given to me by some responder to my original question. Well, not quite. I originally wanted to have to press F3 twice to accomplish the confirm action. So, what's confirm an option of? –  Wes Miller Jan 7 at 13:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was asked to move this answer here by @kazark from its posting location, an addendum to the original question.

Boy did I miss the obvious.

In my solution below, I worked with the reverse of my original logic. To wit, always try to close the current file with a pop. If that works, I'm done. If it fails, I'll generate some error, likely E555, that I can catch. If I catch any error, however, the pop failed and I know to try to close the file and, afterwards, follow the original script. Here is the final result:

" Smart Quit Function ----------------------                                                                             
function! QuitF3()
   try
      pop
   catch 
      try
        quit
      catch /E37:/
         " Unwritten changes.
         echo "E37: Discard changes?  Y|y = Yes, N|n = No, W|w = Write"

         let ans = nr2char( getchar() )

         if      ans == "y" || ans == "Y"
           quit!
         elseif  ans == "w" || ans == "W"
           write
         else
           " Close prompt.
           call feedkeys('\<ESC>')
         endif
        return 0
      endtry
   endtry
endfunction
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Thanks for moving it. I often ping people about that but I'm not sure too many people pay attention. –  Kazark Apr 4 at 19:14

This could be accomplished by a mapping on the key you use to jump to a tag, in order to save the filename or buffer number after the jump on a global variable. Then you could check the current filename/buffer number against the value saved on the quit function.

Here is as possible start:

nnoremap <silent> <c-]> :call JumpTag()<CR>
let g:lastTagBuffer = -1
function! JumpTag()
   let w = expand("<cword>")        " get the word under cursor
   if w =~ '\a'                  " if the word contains a letter
      try
         exe "tag " . w
         let g:lastTagBuffer = bufnr("%")
      catch
         return
      endtry
   endif
endfunction

You can find more information on :h CursorHold-example.

If you prefer you can use a list instead of a single var in order to hold all the tag jumps and include a map on Ctrl+t to remove the last element, then you could mirror the contents of the tagstack.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to chew on this one for a while. I admit my knowledge of vimscript is very poor. I do SO wish vim used a language like Rexx rather than a remake of sh. Anyway, I will work on this for a while tilll I like it, or figure out an interpretation of it. </p>Why is it tagfiles are in a special case anyway? Wouldn't it make more sense to edit them in "browse" mode so you could jump about in and between them easily? –  Wes Miller Jan 7 at 13:53
    
I'm not sure if understood your question on handling of tagfiles. Also, what is the trouble on the suggested solution? It is not advanced vimscript, so feel free to ask what is unclear. The idea is to save the name of the file you entered after you used tags, then you can use it on your Quit function to create a special case when you mistype F3 for Ctrl-T. The code above use the buffer number (identifier) instead of name as it is shorter to store and easier to compare, but you can replace bufnr by bufname to make it easier to understand/debug. –  mMontu Jan 7 at 15:02
    
Sorry, I just know nothing about bufnr is all. And I thought C-] was one of the un-remappable keys. –  Wes Miller Jan 7 at 19:11
    
I added my simpler solution to the original question. I really did like this solution, but I was worried I'd take longer debugging it than I could afford. My idea just popped in my head while starring at some broken code. –  Wes Miller Jan 8 at 17:35

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