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I've a problem with bash array loop.

the following code instead of printing each value separately, joins two values and prints them as if they are one.

#!/bin/bash

declare -a array=( 'sf052' 'to060' 'pw' 'qb099' 'pw22' 'wp039' 'wx12' 'wx11' )
for i in "${array[@]}"; do
    echo $i
done

Output:

sf052
to060
pw
qb099 pw22
wp039 wx12
wx11

Expected output:

sf052
to060
pw
qb099
pw22
wp039
wx12
wx11

Running bash --version gives

GNU bash, version 4.2.45(1)-release (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu)

and uname -a:

Linux server1 3.11.0-12-generic #19-Ubuntu SMP
Wed Oct 9 16:20:46 UTC 2013 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
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3  
Works as expected for me - maybe you have some other problem? –  Paul R Jan 6 '14 at 22:34
2  
works for me in bash 4.2.25 - Ubuntu 12.04. –  crafter Jan 6 '14 at 22:44
3  
I'm guessing you had a typo error. You intended to have 'sf052' 'to060' 'pw' 'qb099' 'pw22' 'wp039' 'wx12' 'wx11' but you may have typed 'sf052' 'to060' 'pw' 'qb099 pw22' 'wp039 wx12' 'wx11' –  alvits Jan 6 '14 at 23:11
3  
while your question looks clean, if you've created the script in a Windows environment and have moved it to a Linux environment, then try dos2unix scriptFile. Good luck. –  shellter Jan 6 '14 at 23:11
2  

1 Answer 1

The separator between qb099 and pw22 should be the space character. The same with wp039 and wx12. To validate that use the octal dump utility.

For me the output is as expected:

0000000   #   !   /   b   i   n   /   b   a   s   h  \n  \n   d   e   c
0000020   l   a   r   e       -   a       a   r   r   a   y   =   (
0000040   '   s   f   0   5   2   '       '   t   o   0   6   0   '
0000060   '   p   w   '       '   q   b   0   9   9   '       '   p   w
0000100   2   2   '       '   w   p   0   3   9   '       '   w   x   1
0000120   2   '       '   w   x   1   1   '       )  \n   f   o   r
0000140   i       i   n       "   $   {   a   r   r   a   y   [   @   ]
0000160   }   "   ;       d   o  \n                   e   c   h   o
0000200   $   i  \n   d   o   n   e  \n

Probably for most of us the code worked, because we copied it from here. However if you copy-paste from Windows (such as Word document) sometimes special characters come in place, that can't be seen visually.

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