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Given the following in a CGI script with Perl and taint mode I have not been able to get past the following.

tail /etc/httpd/logs/error_log 
        /usr/local/share/perl5/Net/DNS/Dig.pm line 906 (#1)
    (F) You tried to do something that the tainting mechanism didn't like.
    The tainting mechanism is turned on when you're running setuid or
    setgid, or when you specify -T to turn it on explicitly.  The
    tainting mechanism labels all data that's derived directly or indirectly
    from the user, who is considered to be unworthy of your trust.  If any
    such data is used in a "dangerous" operation, you get this error.  See
    perlsec for more information.

[Mon Jan  6 16:24:21 2014] dig.cgi: Insecure dependency in eval while running with -T switch at /usr/local/share/perl5/Net/DNS/Dig.pm line 906.

Code:

#!/usr/bin/perl -wT
use warnings;
use strict;
use IO::Socket::INET;
use Net::DNS::Dig;
use CGI;

$ENV{"PATH"} = ""; # Latest attempted fix

my $q      = CGI->new;
my $domain = $q->param('domain');

if ( $domain =~ /(^\w+)\.(\w+\.?\w+\.?\w+)$/ ) {
    $domain = "$1\.$2";
}
else {
    warn("TAINTED DATA SENT BY $ENV{'REMOTE_ADDR'}: $domain: $!");
    $domain = "";    # successful match did not occur
}

my $dig = new Net::DNS::Dig(
    Timeout   => 15,        # default
    Class     => 'IN',      # default
    PeerAddr  => $domain,
    PeerPort  => 53,        # default
    Proto     => 'UDP',     # default
    Recursion => 1,         # default
);

my @result = $dig->for( $domain, 'NS' )->to_text->rdata();
@result = sort @result;
print @result;

I normally use Data::Validate::Domain to do checking for a “valid” domain name, but could not deploy it in a way in which the tainted variable error would not occur.

I read that in order to untaint a variable you have to pass it through a regex with capture groups and then join the capture groups to sanitize it. So I deployed $domain =~ /(^\w+)\.(\w+\.?\w+\.?\w+)$/. As shown here it is not the best regex for the purpose of untainting a domain name and covering all possible domains but it meets my needs. Unfortunately my script is still producing tainted failures and I can not figure out how.

Regexp-Common does not provide a domain regex and modules don’t seem to work with untainting variable so I am at a loss now.

How to get this thing to pass taint checking?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think the problem is in your code (you do untaint $domain), that module just may not work with taint mode on. – ThisSuitIsBlackNot Jan 6 '14 at 22:56
    
Scalar::Util qw(tainted) proved that my variable was not tainted so it is definitely that module in some form or another. Thanks for the help and new (to me) module @Palec – MattSizzle Jan 6 '14 at 23:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

$domain is not tainted

I verified that your $domain is not tainted. This is the only variable you use that could be tainted, in my opinion.

perl -T <(cat <<'EOF'
use Scalar::Util qw(tainted);
sub p_t($) {
    if (tainted $_[0]) {
        print "Tainted\n";
    } else {
        print "Not tainted\n";
    }
}
my $domain = shift;
p_t($domain);
if ($domain =~ /(^\w+)\.(\w+\.?\w+\.?\w+)$/) {
    $domain = "$1\.$2";
} else {
    warn("$domain\n");
    $domain = "";
}
p_t($domain);
EOF
) abc.def

It prints

Tainted
Not tainted

What Net::DNS::Dig does

See Net::DNS::Dig line 906. It is the beginning of to_text method.

sub to_text {
    my $self = shift;
    my $d = Data::Dumper->new([$self],['tobj']);
    $d->Purity(1)->Deepcopy(1)->Indent(1);
    my $tobj;
    eval $d->Dump; # line 906
    …

From new definition I know that $self is just hashref containing values from new parameters and several other filled in the constructor. The evaled code produced by $d->Dump is setting $tobj to a deep copy of $self (Deepcopy(1)), with correctly set self-references (Purity(1)) and basic pretty-printing (Indent(1)).

Where is the problem, how to debug

From what I found out about &Net::DNS::Dig::to_text, it is clear that the problem is at least one tainted item inside $self. So you have a straightforward way to debug your problem further: after constructing the $dig object in your script, check which of its items is tainted. You can dump the whole structure to stdout using print Data::Dumper::Dump($dig);, which is roughly the same as the evaled code, and check suspicious items using &Scalar::Util::tainted.

I have no idea how far this is from making Net::DNS::Dig work in taint mode. I do not use it, I was just curious and wanted to find out, where the problem is. As you managed to solve your problem otherwise, I leave it at this stage, allowing others to continue debugging the issue.

share|improve this answer

As resolution to this question if anyone comes across it in the future it was indeed the module I was using which caused the taint checks to fail. Teaching me an important lesson on trusting modules in a CGI environment. I switched to Net::DNS as I figured it would not encounter this issue and sure enough it does not. My code is provided below for reference in case anyone wants to accomplish the same thing I set out to do which is: locate the nameservers defined for a domain within its own zone file.

#!/usr/bin/perl -wT
use warnings;
use strict;
use IO::Socket::INET;
use Net::DNS;
use CGI;

$ENV{"PATH"} = ""; // Latest attempted fix

my $q      = CGI->new;
my $domain = $q->param('domain');
my @result;

if ( $domain =~ /(^\w+)\.(\w+\.?\w+\.?\w+)$/ ) {
    $domain = "$1\.$2";
}
else {
    warn("TAINTED DATA SENT BY $ENV{'REMOTE_ADDR'}: $domain: $!");
    $domain = "";    # successful match did not occur
}

my $ip = inet_ntoa(inet_aton($domain));

my $res   = Net::DNS::Resolver->new(
    nameservers => [($ip)],
);
                        my $query = $res->query($domain, "NS");

                        if ($query) {
                                foreach my $rr (grep { $_->type eq 'NS' } $query->answer) {
                                push(@result, $rr->nsdname);
                                }
                        }
                        else {
                                warn "query failed: ", $res->errorstring, "\n";
                        }

@result = sort @result;
print @result;

Thanks for the comments assisting me in this matter, and SO for teaching more then any other resource I have come across.

share|improve this answer

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