Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

my node.js app connects through var socket = net.createConnection(port, ip); to download a file from another server. As soon as connection is made the server sends the file as data.

I catch it then by doing

socket.on('data', function(data) {

}).on('connect', function() {

}).on('end', function() {
console.log('DONE');
});

My initial goal is, to download the file using the method above and at the same time give the bytes to the client's browser as a downloadable file. For example: user clicks a button on the site which triggers the server-side download function and the user gets the file-save prompt. Node.JS then downloads the file from the remote server and at the same time gives each new byte to the user at the browser client. Is this possible? I imagine it would need to send headers of octet-stream to trigger file transfer between browser Node.JS. But how?

Update

Now I tried the code below with the help of the answer below:

app.get('/download', function (req, res) {

res.setHeader('Content-disposition', 'attachment; filename=' + "afile.txt");
res.setHeader('Content-Length', "12468")

var socket = net.createConnection(1024, "localhost");
console.log('Socket created.');
socket.on('data', function(data) {

    socket.pipe(res)

}).on('connect', function() {
// // Manually write an HTTP request.
// socket.write("GET / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n");
}).on('end', function() {
    console.log('DONE');
    socket.end();
});

 });

The data is being sent to the user's browser as a download, but the end result is a broken file. I checked the contents within and it seeems that something along the process causes the file to corrupt. I think now I have to write byte per byte? rather than doing socket.pipe?

share|improve this question
1  
You can't do that, but you can receive the whole file in memory using sockets and then make the user download the file using a data URI. Like so: stackoverflow.com/questions/3665115/…. Streaming the file directly for the user to download however isn't possible using websockets. –  SimonPlus Jan 7 '14 at 1:28
    
File download is only avaialable over http. That interface is not there for websocket as sending file over it is yet to be standardised. See another similar question stackoverflow.com/questions/9871357/…. –  user568109 Jan 7 '14 at 6:19
    
You are mixing on('data') and pipe. Your first chunk of data is lost when you attach .pipe –  Andrey Sidorov Jan 7 '14 at 13:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to set content-disposition header in your http response:

  response.writeHead(200, {
    'Content-Disposition': 'attachment; filename=genome.jpeg; modification-date="Wed, 12 Feb 1997 16:29:51 -0500"'
  });
  yourDataStream.pipe(response);

see RFC2183

share|improve this answer
    
The file is being sent over websocket. –  user568109 Jan 7 '14 at 5:38
    
why can't you serve it over http? –  Andrey Sidorov Jan 7 '14 at 5:58
    
You can but that is not what OP is asking for. –  user568109 Jan 7 '14 at 6:10
    
I don't see reference to websockets in the question. Everything in question is possible via plain old http/ajax –  Andrey Sidorov Jan 7 '14 at 7:32
    
Sorry, may be you're right. I assumed the code in question that catches file runs on browser. Otherwise you answer it correctly. –  user568109 Jan 7 '14 at 8:47

It looks like you may want this:

app.get('/download', function (req, res) {
  res.attachment('afile.txt');
  require('http').get('http://localhost:1234/', function(response) {
    response.pipe(res);
  }).on('error', function(err) {
    res.send(500, err.message);
  });
});
share|improve this answer

I found the solution! by doing res.write(d) i was able to direct the bytes from the other connection to the user browser download. app.get('/download', function (req, res) {

res.setHeader('Content-disposition', 'attachment; filename=' + "afile.jpg");
res.setHeader('Content-Length', "383790");
res.setHeader('Content-Type','image/jpeg');

var socket = net.createConnection(1024, "localhost");
console.log('Socket created.');
//socket.setEncoding("utf8");
socket.on('data', function(d) {
    console.log(d);
    res.write(d);
}).on('connect', function() {
// // Manually write an HTTP request.
// socket.write("GET / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n");
}).on('end', function() {
    console.log('DONE');
    socket.end();
});


});
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.