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The program below works well under OS X but not in linux. It continues to loop through the perror("read error") line, with no bytes in the read buffer, and EWOULDBLOCK isn't the errno (errno=0);

In OS X the program works as expected, which is that it reads from three named pipes, and prints any data from any of them to the console.

        #include <sys/types.h>
        #include <sys/select.h>
        #include <sys/time.h>
        #include <sys/types.h>
        #include <errno.h>
        #include <stdlib.h>
        #include <stdio.h>
        #include <fcntl.h>
        #include <unistd.h>


        int readPipe(int fd)
        {
            ssize_t bytes;
            size_t total_bytes = 0;
            char buffer[100*1024];

            printf("\nReading pipe descriptor # %d\n",fd);
            for(;;) {
                bytes = read(fd, buffer, sizeof(buffer));
                if (bytes > 0) {
                    total_bytes += (size_t)bytes;
                    printf("%s", buffer);
                } 
                else {
                    if (errno == EWOULDBLOCK) {
                        break; // recieve buffer is empty so return to main loop
                    } 
                    else {
                        perror("read error"); 
                        return EXIT_FAILURE;
                    }
                }
            }
            return EXIT_SUCCESS;
        }


        int main(int argc, char* argv[])
        {
            int fd_a, fd_b, fd_c;   // file descriptors for each pipe
            int nfd;                // select() return value
            fd_set read_fds;        // file descriptor read flags
            struct timeval tv;
            tv.tv_sec = 0;
            tv.tv_usec = 10000;

            // create pipes to monitor (if they don't already exist)
            system("mkfifo /tmp/PIPE_A");
            system("mkfifo /tmp/PIPE_B");
            system("mkfifo /tmp/PIPE_C");
            system("chmod 666 /tmp/PIPE_*");

            // open file descriptors of named pipes to watch
            fd_a = open("/tmp/PIPE_A", O_RDONLY | O_NONBLOCK); // the O_RDWR flag is undefined on a FIFO.
            if (fd_a == -1) {
                perror("open error");
                return EXIT_FAILURE;
            }

            fd_b = open("/tmp/PIPE_B", O_RDONLY | O_NONBLOCK);
            if (fd_b == -1) {
                perror("open error");
                return EXIT_FAILURE;
            }

            fd_c = open("/tmp/PIPE_C", O_RDONLY | O_NONBLOCK);
            if (fd_c == -1) {
                perror("open error");
                return EXIT_FAILURE;
            }

            // check for new data in each of the pipes
            for(;;)
            {
                // clear fds read flags
                FD_ZERO(&read_fds);

                // PIPE_A
                FD_SET(fd_a, &read_fds);
                nfd = select(fd_a+1, &read_fds, NULL, NULL, &tv);
                if (nfd != 0) {
                    if (nfd == -1) {
                        perror("select error");
                        return EXIT_FAILURE;
                    }
                    if (FD_ISSET(fd_a, &read_fds)) {
                        readPipe(fd_a);
                    }
                }

                // PIPE_B
                FD_SET(fd_b, &read_fds);
                nfd = select(fd_b+1, &read_fds, NULL, NULL, &tv);
                if (nfd != 0) {
                    if (nfd == -1) {
                        perror("select error");
                        return EXIT_FAILURE;
                    }
                    if (FD_ISSET(fd_b, &read_fds)){
                        readPipe(fd_b);
                    }
                }

                // PIPE_C
                FD_SET(fd_c, &read_fds);
                nfd = select(fd_c+1, &read_fds, NULL, NULL, &tv);
                if (nfd != 0) {
                    if (nfd == -1) {
                        perror("select error");
                        return EXIT_FAILURE;
                    }
                    if (FD_ISSET(fd_c, &read_fds)){
                        readPipe(fd_c);
                    }
                }
            }
            return EXIT_SUCCESS;
        }
share|improve this question
    
The timeout for the pipe read (tv.tv_usec) should be 0 (for both OSs). –  Walt Jan 7 '14 at 0:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is allowable (and expected) that read can return 0. This means the pipe is returning EOF. You are not handling this condition. The contents of errno are irrelevant unless the call fails and returns -1.

for (;;)
{
    bytes = read(fd, buffer, sizeof(buffer));

    if (bytes > 0)
    {
        total_bytes += (size_t)bytes;
        printf("%s", buffer);
    }

    if (bytes == 0)
        return //something appropriate

    if (bytes == -1)
    {
        if (errno == EWOULDBLOCK)
           break; // recieve buffer is empty so return to main loop
        else
        {
            perror("read error");
            return EXIT_FAILURE;
        }
    }
}

You are going through the effort to return different codes but you don't pay any attention to them in main.

Also, what's with the 3 select statements again? I thought that was cleared up in a previous question.

Edit

for (;;)
{
    // clear fds read flags
    FD_ZERO(&read_fds);
    FD_SET(fd_a, &read_fds);
    FD_SET(fd_b, &read_fds);
    FD_SET(fd_c, &read_fds);

    tv.tv_sec = 0;
    tv.tv_usec = 10000;

    nfd = select(fd_c + 1, &read_fds, NULL, NULL, &tv);

    if (nfd == 0) //timeout - continue or do something else for a bit
        continue;

    if (nfd == -1)
    {
        perror("select error");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    if (FD_ISSET(fd_a, &read_fds))
        readPipe(fd_a);

    if (FD_ISSET(fd_b, &read_fds))
        readPipe(fd_b);

    if (FD_ISSET(fd_c, &read_fds))
        readPipe(fd_c);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the feedback. When errno = 0, the pipe being read has no data which is an expected case so an EXIT_SUCCESS is appropriate (and I realize not handled in this little example program). Applying this change in linux, it still loops through the readPipe call (but not in OS X). So if I remove the printf() statement under linux, it behaves much better. Regarding the three selects, I reduced the fd_sets but I though the multiple selects were still needed (I have yet to find a model or example of what I'm trying to do). If you can point me to one, that would be much appreciated!. –  Walt Jan 7 '14 at 1:14
    
No, that's not quite right. If the return code is 0 there is no data - in fact writer end of the pipe has closed. Errno is meaningless unless the function returns -1. Most calls do not set errno unless the call failed. So in the absence of a failed call whatever is in errno could be from any previous call on any previous file descriptor. I have outline basically what you want to do with select. –  Duck Jan 7 '14 at 1:40
    
I see FD_ISSET gets called only after all three fd have been used to update the read_fds flags, and then the highest fd is used for the select. Looks good, and more efficient too. I also understand errno=0 means EOF (writer closed) and how to handle that now. I'm still not clear on the different behaviors between OS X and Linux, but my need is for linux only. It seems like the read_fds flags may get set/cleared differently between the OS' after a read takes place, or something like that... –  Walt Jan 7 '14 at 3:57
    
@Wait, I'm going to say this for 3rd time just to make sure we are on the same page. "errno == 0" does not mean EOF. The return code (in your case "bytes") equaling 0 is EOF. errno is only relevant on a failed (return of -1) call. The read/write/exc sets get changed by select - that's how you know they are readable/writable - and thus need to be reset before each call. This is posix compliant. You probably didn't notice it on OSX because you only used one FD per call (and thus the other two had no possibility of changing). –  Duck Jan 7 '14 at 4:11
    
On linux the timer fields should also be reset before each call. I forget if that is enforced by posix or not. –  Duck Jan 7 '14 at 4:12

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