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I can't get the Server and Client to communicate when they are both in different terminal windows. I can get them to both connect though not actually send their output to each others windows.I Client:

from twisted.internet import reactor, stdio, protocol

from twisted.protocols import basic


class Echo(basic.LineReceiver):

   def connectionMade(self):

       print "Welcome to the Chat, you have now connected"


  def lineReceived(self, line):

       self.sendLine(line)

       if line=="exit":

           connectionLost()



  def connectionLost(self):

       self.transport.loseConnection()


class EchoClientFactory(protocol.ClientFactory):

    protocol = Echo


factory = EchoClientFactory()

reactor.connectTCP("localhost", ...., factory)

reactor.run()

Server:

 from twisted.internet import reactor, protocol, stdio

 from twisted.protocols import basic


 class Echo(basic.LineReceiver):

     print "Welcome to Chat"

     def connectionMade(self):

          print "A new client has connected"

     def lineReceived(self, line):

          self.sendLine(line)

          if line=="exit":

             connectionLost()


    def connectionLost(self):

       self.transport.loseConnection()



 class EchoServerFactory(protocol.ServerFactory):

    protocol = Echo


 factory = EchoServerFactory()

 reactor.listenTCP(...., factory)

 reactor.run()
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closed as unclear what you're asking by Jean-Paul Calderone, legoscia, Daniel, stephbu, Anand Jan 7 at 15:19

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer 1

It is vital that you always post the exact code that you are running - your Echo Server specifies .... as the port which raises a syntax error on execution. Posting the exact code will mean you get better responses faster.

Replacing the port with a number, 9999 say allows the server code to run. Now we can connect via telnet or netcat to test the server:

$ nc -c localhost 9999
hello
hello

Great! The server works fine. Note that it gives an error when you type "exit":

exceptions.NameError: global name 'loseConnection' is not defined

You should be calling self.transport.loseConnection() if you want to drop the connection manually. The connectionLost method you've defined is then called as an event to allow you to respond. You don't really need to define that method at this stage. Here is a modified version of your server code with the changes suggested:

from twisted.internet import reactor, protocol, stdio
from twisted.protocols import basic

class Echo(basic.LineReceiver):
    print "Welcome to Chat"

    def connectionMade(self):
        print "A new client has connected"

    def lineReceived(self, line):
        print 'server received:', line
        print 'server sent:', line, '\n'
        self.sendLine(line)
        if line=="exit":
             self.transport.loseConnection()


class EchoServerFactory(protocol.ServerFactory):
   protocol = Echo


factory = EchoServerFactory()
reactor.listenTCP(9999, factory)
reactor.run()

The client has the same problem with the port, changing to 9999 allows it to run. Your client connects, but then does not send any data. Here's a version that sends some text when it connects and echos text back to the server after a 2 second delay:

from twisted.internet import reactor, stdio, protocol
from twisted.protocols import basic

class Echo(basic.LineReceiver):
    def connectionMade(self):
        print "Welcome to the Chat, you have now connected"

        # send some text when we connect
        self.sendLine('hello')

    def lineReceived(self, line):
        print 'client received:', line

        if len(line) > 10:
            self.sendLine('exit')
        else:
            # send a response in 2 seconds
            reactor.callLater(2, self.sendLine, '>' + line)

    def connectionLost(self, reason):
        reactor.stop()


class EchoClientFactory(protocol.ClientFactory):
    protocol = Echo

factory = EchoClientFactory()
reactor.connectTCP("localhost", 9999, factory)
reactor.run()

This causes the original message to bounce back and forwards to the server, while the client prepends a > character each time. The client will then send "exit" when the message gets to a certain length, causing the connection to be dropped by the server. When the connection is dropped, the client can stop its reactor so that it exits.

Typing into the terminal window does not send data through your client to the server - use telnet or netcat for this purpose.

share|improve this answer
    
Your code didn't work, all I want is to make them chat to each other, twisted is so confusing. –  mateus Jan 7 at 4:50
    
What is the purpose of: sendLine() and self.transport.write? They both seem like they transport data, yet in reality actually just print to the terminal window. And whats the difference between dataRecieved and lineRecieved they both seemd to do exactly the same thing. I tried rector.callLater from your code and it didn't work. This is really frustrating, the more I learn about twisted the more confusing it gets plus the community is dead so this ridiculously small problem has taken me ages. I can write server-client without twisted but I just want to learn it. Errrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr...... –  mateus Jan 7 at 4:55
    
@mateus The LineReceiver class extends the base Protocol class and defines sendLine as a convenience method - it is probably something like self.transport.write(line + '\n'). It also defines lineReceived that gets called only when a complete line has been received, while the base Protocol class has dataReceived which is called when you might only have partial lines (eg only a few characters). You can't overwrite dataReceived in your LineReceiver class if you still want lineReceived to be called. –  Peter Gibson Jan 7 at 5:28
    
@mateus what exactly doesn't work for you and what were you expecting to happen - it works here –  Peter Gibson Jan 7 at 5:28
    
@mateus, oh are you expecting Chat functionality? sendLine and self.transport.write only send data back to the client of that connection. Take a look at twistedmatrix.com/documents/current/core/examples/#auto1 if you want to send messages to other clients –  Peter Gibson Jan 7 at 5:30

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