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Can I generate in C# auto-property with default value?

public class MyClass
{
     MyClass()
     {
         Reason = "my reason";
     }

     public string Reason{ get; set; }
}
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marked as duplicate by Vishal Suthar, weston, Eren Ersönmez, Soner Gönül, Abbas Jan 7 at 9:32

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1  
Did you try it to see if it works? –  Sani Huttunen Jan 7 at 9:28
2  
Are you asking if the code you've provided is valid or if there is another way ? For auto-properties - NO, that's the only way. –  Dimitar Dimitrov Jan 7 at 9:28
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3 Answers 3

Yes, you can. Definitely. Just like you've shown it.

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What's the downvote for? (I originally wanted to post a single "Yes.", but unfortunately, SO wouldn't let me post such a short answer.) –  O. R. Mapper Jan 7 at 9:34
    
Didn't put the down-vote but it won't work as shown because the constructor is not public, so var mc = new MyClass() won't even compile. –  Abbas Jan 7 at 9:39
    
@Abbas: As explained on MSDN, the default visibility for members is private, so indeed the constructor is not public. It can only be called from within the class. Where does the OP require var mc = new MyClass(); to be compileable? –  O. R. Mapper Jan 7 at 9:44
    
@Abbas He's not doing new anywhere ... If you want to be pedantic. Anyway +1 :) –  Dimitar Dimitrov Jan 7 at 9:45
1  
No it's good to point it out. Makes me think longer before giving comments/answers. ;) –  Abbas Jan 7 at 9:54
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Yes, but to be able to create an instance from outside your class, make your constructor public.

public class MyClass
{
    public MyClass()
    {
        Reason = "my reason";
    }

    public string Reason {get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You have to add a default constructor and initialize the autoproperty value.

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That's what he did. He just wants to know if it'll work. –  Abbas Jan 7 at 9:30
    
I am asking if it is a correct/best way –  Yakov Jan 7 at 9:31
1  
Yes, that's the only way.!! –  Vishal Suthar Jan 7 at 9:32
    
I proposed this solution because it works! ;) –  Dare Devil 73 Jan 7 at 9:34
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