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I'm trying to parallelize a code that I made to generate some images randomly (for an specific problem that I working on). As I use classes and I found that is not straightforward to multiprocess methods, I looked for some alternatives and found this approach:

#https://gist.github.com/fiatmoney/1086393
#MultiprocessingMethods.py

def _pickle_method(method):
    func_name = method.im_func.__name__
    obj = method.im_self
    cls = method.im_class
    if func_name.startswith('__') and not func_name.endswith('__'): #deal with mangled names
        cls_name = cls.__name__.lstrip('_')
        func_name = '_' + cls_name + func_name
    return _unpickle_method, (func_name, obj, cls)


def _unpickle_method(func_name, obj, cls):
    for cls in cls.__mro__:
        try:
            func = cls.__dict__[func_name]
        except KeyError:
            pass
        else:
            break
    return func.__get__(obj, cls)

So, I applied this to my code:

from multiprocessing import Pool
from PIL import Image

import MultiprocessingMethods as Mp
import Utils

import random
import pylab as plt  
import copy_reg
import types

copy_reg.pickle(types.MethodType, Mp._pickle_method, Mp._unpickle_method)

class ImageData(object):

    def __init__(self, width, height, range_min=-1, range_max=1):
        self.width = width
        self.height = height
        #The values range each pixel can assume
        self.range_min = range_min
        self.range_max = range_max
        self.data = []
        for i in range(width):
            self.data.append([0] * height)

    def generate_heat_map_image(self, name):
        """
        Generate a heat map of the image
        :param name: the name of the file
        """
        #self.normalize_image_data()
        plt.figure()
        fig = plt.imshow(self.data, extent=[-1, 1, -1, 1])
        plt.colorbar(fig)
        plt.savefig(name+".png")
        plt.close()

    def shepard_interpolation(self, seeds=10):
        print type (self.data)
        #Code omitted 'cause it doesn't effect the problem 
        return self.data


if __name__ == '__main__':   
    x = [ImageData(50, 50), ImageData(50, 50)]
    p = Pool()
    outputs = p.map(ImageData.shepard_interpolation,x)

    #A [[[ ]]]
    print outputs
    for i in range(len(outputs)):
        # A [[ ]]
        print outputs[i]
        outputs[i].generate_heat_map_image("ImagesOutput/Entries/Entry"+str(i))   

Now I could parallelized my process, but I get as output an array of arrays and I don't know why. Before this, I always got an array of ImageData, and I could generate a heat map image with matplotlib. Does this kind of return have something to do with the multiprocessing? I guess so, 'cause I'm getting "AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'generate_heat_map_image'", and the return should be a list of ImageData type, nor a list of lists. Can I return an array of ImageData?

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Flexo Jan 13 '14 at 22:04

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Flexo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

The ImageData class identation is wrong, so your method doesn't actually belong to the class, even without multiprocessing ; here is the correct one :

class ImageData:
    def __init__(self, width, height, range_min=-1, range_max=1):
        self.width = width
        self.height = height
        #Which values each pixel can assume
        self.range_min = range_min
        self.range_max = range_max
        self.data = []
        for i in range(width):
           self.data.append([0] * height)

    def interpolate_points(self, seeds):
        points = []
        f = []
        for i in range(seeds):
            # Generate a cell position
            pos_x = random.randrange(self.width)
            pos_y = random.randrange(self.height)

            # Save the f(x,y) data
            x = Utils.translate_range(pos_x, 0, self.width, self.range_min, self.range_max)
            y = Utils.translate_range(pos_y, 0, self.height, self.range_min, self.range_max)
            z = Utils.function(x, y)
            points.append([x, y])

            f.append(z)
        for x in range(self.width):
            xt = (Utils.translate_range(x, 0, self.width, self.range_min, self.range_max))
            for y in range(self.height):
                yt = (Utils.translate_range(y, 0, self.height, self.range_min, self.range_max))
                self.data[x][y] = Utils.shepard_euclidian(points, f, [xt, yt], 3)

    # >>>> Note the identation change here!
    def generate_heat_map_image(self, name):
        """
        Generate a heat map of the image
        :param name: the name of the file
        """

        #self.normalize_image_data()
        plt.figure()
        fig = plt.imshow(self.data, extent=[-1, 1, -1, 1])
        plt.colorbar(fig)
        plt.savefig(name+".png")
        plt.close()
share|improve this answer
    
The indentation is ok in my code. This was a problem when I pasted it. I will edit. – pceccon Jan 7 '14 at 11:37
    
What kind of error/exception do you get? Can you post a stack trace? – F.X. Jan 7 '14 at 13:47
    
I found that is not straightforward to apply multiprocessing with Python. I found an alternative, but I still have problems. I will update my question. Thank you, @F.X. – pceccon Jan 7 '14 at 14:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Solved. I just had to put:

def shepard_interpolation(self, seeds=10):
    print type (self.data)
    #Code omitted 'cause it doesn't effect the problem 
    return self

Things that happens after 5 uninterruptible hours of programming. Thank you, folks.

share|improve this answer

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