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My installation of GNU Emacs 24.3.1 is "helpfully" turning the words "lambda" (in python-mode) and "fn" (in clojure-mode) into the Greek symbol λ. I'm sure this delights some people, but I'm not one of them. :)

Do any Emacs hackers out there know how to turn off this unwanted feature?

I have tried the following in my init.el, but to no avail:

(defconst keywords-to-remove '(lambda fn))
(font-lock-remove-keywords 'clojure-mode keywords-to-remove)
(font-lock-remove-keywords 'lisp-mode keywords-to-remove)
(font-lock-remove-keywords 'python-mode keywords-to-remove)

Here are the current contents of my init.el:

(require 'package)
(add-to-list 'package-archives
             '("marmalade" . "http://marmalade-repo.org/packages/") t)

(package-initialize)

(when (not package-archive-contents)
  (package-refresh-contents))

(defvar my-packages '(starter-kit
                      starter-kit-lisp
                      starter-kit-bindings
                      auto-complete
                      slime
                      ac-slime
                      rainbow-delimiters
                      clojure-mode
                      nrepl))

(dolist (p my-packages)
  (when (not (package-installed-p p))
    (package-install p)))

(global-set-key (kbd "<C-tab>") 'next-multiframe-window)

(require 'auto-complete-config)
(add-to-list 'ac-dictionary-directories "~/.emacs.d/ac-dict")
(ac-config-default)
(setq ac-delay 0.2) ;; eclipse uses 500ms

(add-to-list 'load-path "~/.emacs.d/ac-slime")
(require 'ac-slime)
(add-hook 'slime-mode-hook 'set-up-slime-ac)
(add-hook 'slime-repl-mode-hook 'set-up-slime-ac)

(setq default-truncate-lines t)

(defun indent-buffer ()
  "Indents an entire buffer using the default intenting scheme."
  (interactive)
  (save-excursion
    (delete-trailing-whitespace)
    (indent-region (point-min) (point-max) nil)
    (untabify (point-min) (point-max))))

(require 'rainbow-delimiters)
(global-rainbow-delimiters-mode)

(require 'color-theme)
(eval-after-load "color-theme"
  '(progn
     (color-theme-initialize)
     (color-theme-ld-dark)))

(add-to-list 'auto-mode-alist '("\.cljs$" . clojure-mode))

;; Allow input to be sent to somewhere other than inferior-lisp
;;
;; This is a total hack: we're hardcoding the name of the shell buffer
(defun shell-send-input (input)
  "Send INPUT into the *shell* buffer and leave it visible."
  (save-selected-window
    (switch-to-buffer-other-window "*shell*")
    (goto-char (point-max))
    (insert input)
    (comint-send-input)))

(defun defun-at-point ()
  "Return the text of the defun at point."
  (apply #'buffer-substring-no-properties
         (region-for-defun-at-point)))

(defun region-for-defun-at-point ()
  "Return the start and end position of defun at point."
  (save-excursion
    (save-match-data
      (end-of-defun)
      (let ((end (point)))
        (beginning-of-defun)
        (list (point) end)))))

(defun expression-preceding-point ()
  "Return the expression preceding point as a string."
  (buffer-substring-no-properties
   (save-excursion (backward-sexp) (point))
   (point)))

(defun shell-eval-last-expression ()
  "Send the expression preceding point to the *shell* buffer."
  (interactive)
  (shell-send-input (expression-preceding-point)))

(defun shell-eval-defun ()
  "Send the current toplevel expression to the *shell* buffer."
  (interactive)
  (shell-send-input (defun-at-point)))

(add-hook 'clojure-mode-hook
          '(lambda ()
             (define-key clojure-mode-map (kbd "C-c e") 'shell-eval-last-expression)
             (define-key clojure-mode-map (kbd "C-c x") 'shell-eval-defun)))
share|improve this question
1  
You should check the font-lock-keywords variable to see if these string (lambda, fn) are in there with some special rules. If so, get rid of those and you're good to go. Reference. – Noufal Ibrahim Jan 7 '14 at 12:28
    
Thanks, Noufal, that gave me a place to start looking. Why didn't you answer instead of comment? – Josh Glover Jan 7 '14 at 12:46
1  
This isn't default behaviour for Emacs, so the culprit is most likely a library you've added yourself (or potentially something in default.el or site-start.el if those exist anywhere in the default load-path, but that's not terribly common nowadays). – phils Jan 7 '14 at 21:47
1  
You can check if it's in your site config by running emacs -q. This doesn't load your init.el, but it does load site-start.el. So if emacs -q causes the behavior, it is in site-start.el. This is unlikely; it's probably in your init.el. – jpkotta Jan 7 '14 at 22:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you use starter-kit, then you can also turn off the esk-pretty-lambdas feature with:

(remove-hook 'prog-mode-hook 'esk-pretty-lambdas)

in your dot emacs or init file.

share|improve this answer
    
Worked a charm! I guess that teaches me to always include my init.el contents when asking an Emacs question; so you've both answered and meta-answered. ;) – Josh Glover Jan 8 '14 at 13:09

Emacs-24.4 has a new global minor mode prettify-symbols-mode meant to control this. I suggest you contact the maintainers of your major modes and ask them to try and obey this minor mode when it is defined.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, but that doesn't help me, since I'm running 24.3. – Josh Glover Jan 7 '14 at 13:50
1  
@JoshGlover, actually, prettify-symbols-mode is also in at least 24.3.50.1, and likely a few versions before that. Try C-h m to see if this mode is active. If not, check for pretty-mode or purty-mode, two similar third-party libraries. – Chris Jan 7 '14 at 14:03
    
Googling "λ" emacs clojure-mode lisp-mode python-mode hits pretty-mode.el. – Tobias Jan 7 '14 at 16:08
1  
Bisect your init file recursively to find which code is responsible for prettifying lambda that way -- there are multiple possibilities (including pretty-lambdada.el and the others already mentioned). Depending on the culprit, deal with it according to what that library's doc says. – Drew Jan 7 '14 at 16:25

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