Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am working on a project whose MySQL database contains two tables; people and percentages.

people table:

+----+------+--------+
| ID | Name | Parent |
+----+------+--------+
|  1 | A    |      0 |
|  2 |  B   |      1 |
|  3 |   C  |      2 |
|  4 |    D |      3 |
|  5 |  E   |      1 |
|  6 | F    |      0 |
+----+------+--------+

Percentages table:

+----+------------+
| ID | Percentage |
+----+------------+
|  1 | 70%        |
|  2 | 60%        |
|  3 | 10%        |
|  4 | 5%         |
|  5 | 40%        |
|  6 | 30%        |
+----+------------+

The query result I am seeking should be as the following:

+----+------------+----------------+--------+
| ID | Percentage |  Calculation   | Actual |
+----+------------+----------------+--------+
|  1 |         70 | 70%            | 70.00% |
|  2 |         60 | 70%*60%        | 42.00% |
|  3 |         10 | 70%*60%*10%    | 4.20%  |
|  4 |          5 | 70%*60%*10%*5% | 0.21%  |
|  5 |         40 | 70%*40%        | 28.00% |
|  6 |         30 | 30%            | 30.00% |
+----+------------+----------------+--------+

The Calculation column is only for elaboration. Is there any MySQL technique that i could use to achieve this hierarchical query? Even if the percentages table might contain multiple entries (percentages) for the same person ?

share|improve this question
    
You want the result of the calculation? –  maythesource.com Jan 7 '14 at 15:04
1  
MySQL has pitifully bad support for hierarchical data structures. Either you will need to write a stored procedure. Or, you can modify the data structure to contain the entire path to the root, instead of just the parent. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 7 '14 at 15:09
    
@Gordon Linoff You completely hit the crux of the matter! –  maythesource.com Jan 7 '14 at 15:10
    
or join the table to itself as often as could possibly be required (yuk) or handle the recursion at the application level (yum) or switch to a nested set model. –  Strawberry Jan 7 '14 at 16:32
    
@Gordon that's because it doesn't have to. Complaining about missing graph features on a relational DBS is the same as complaining about a KTM on a paved highway. –  Markus Malkusch Jan 7 '14 at 17:00

5 Answers 5

A solution is to utilize the function described at the following link for heirarchical queries:

Instead of making a PATH though, you will want to calculate the multiplication.

SOLUTION SCRIPT

Copy and paste this directly in a mysql console. I have not had much luck in workbench. Additionally, this can be further optimized by combining hierarchy_sys_connect_by_path_percentage and hierarchy_sys_connect_by_path_percentage_result into one stored procedure. Unfortunately this may be quite slow for giant data sets.

Setup Table and Data

drop table people;
drop table percentages;

create table people
(
  id  int,
  name varchar(10),
  parent int
);

create table percentages
(
   id int,
   percentage float
);

insert into people values(1,' A    ',0);
insert into people values(2,'  B   ',1);
insert into people values(3,'   C  ',2);
insert into people values(4,'    D ',3);
insert into people values(5,'  E   ',1);
insert into people values(6,' F    ',0);

insert into percentages values(1,0.70);
insert into percentages values(2,0.60);
insert into percentages values(3,0.10);
insert into percentages values(4,0.5);
insert into percentages values(5,0.40);
insert into percentages values(6,0.30);

DELIMITER $$

DROP  FUNCTION  IF  EXISTS  `hierarchy_sys_connect_by_path_percentage`$$

CREATE FUNCTION hierarchy_sys_connect_by_path_percentage(
                                       delimiter TEXT, 
                                       node INT) 
                                       RETURNS TEXT
    NOT DETERMINISTIC
    READS SQL DATA
BEGIN
     DECLARE _path TEXT;
     DECLARE _id INT;
     DECLARE _percentage FLOAT;
     DECLARE EXIT HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND RETURN _path;
     SET _id = COALESCE(node, @id);

        SELECT  Percentage
              INTO    _path
         FROM    percentages
         WHERE   id = _id;

     LOOP
              SELECT  parent
              INTO    _id
         FROM    people
         WHERE   id = _id
                    AND COALESCE(id <> @start_with, TRUE);

        SELECT  Percentage
              INTO    _percentage
         FROM    percentages
         WHERE   id = _id;

        SET _path = CONCAT( _percentage , delimiter, _path);
    END LOOP;
END $$


DROP  FUNCTION  IF  EXISTS  `hierarchy_sys_connect_by_path_percentage_result`$$

CREATE FUNCTION hierarchy_sys_connect_by_path_percentage_result(
                                       node INT) 
                                       RETURNS FLOAT
    NOT DETERMINISTIC
    READS SQL DATA
BEGIN
     DECLARE _path TEXT;
     DECLARE _id INT;
     DECLARE _percentage FLOAT;
     DECLARE EXIT HANDLER FOR NOT FOUND RETURN _path;
     SET _id = COALESCE(node, @id);

        SELECT  Percentage
              INTO    _path
         FROM    percentages
         WHERE   id = _id;

     LOOP
              SELECT  parent
              INTO    _id
         FROM    people
         WHERE   id = _id
                    AND COALESCE(id <> @start_with, TRUE);

        SELECT  Percentage
              INTO    _percentage
         FROM    percentages
         WHERE   id = _id;

        SET _path = _percentage *  _path;
    END LOOP;
END $$

DELIMITER ;

Query

SELECT  hi.id AS ID,
        p.Percentage,
        hierarchy_sys_connect_by_path_percentage('*', hi.id) AS Calculation,
        hierarchy_sys_connect_by_path_percentage_result(hi.id) AS Actual        
FROM    people hi
JOIN    percentages p
ON      hi.id = p.id;

Result

+------+------------+-----------------+--------------------+
| ID   | Percentage | Calculation     | Actual             |
+------+------------+-----------------+--------------------+
|    1 |        0.7 | 0.7             |  0.699999988079071 |
|    2 |        0.6 | 0.7*0.6         |  0.419999986886978 |
|    3 |        0.1 | 0.7*0.6*0.1     | 0.0419999994337559 |
|    4 |        0.5 | 0.7*0.6*0.1*0.5 | 0.0210000015795231 |
|    5 |        0.4 | 0.7*0.4         |  0.280000001192093 |
|    6 |        0.3 | 0.3             |  0.300000011920929 |
+------+------------+-----------------+--------------------+

Formatting the numbers is trivial so I leave it to you... More important are optimizations to make less calls on the database.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, as this extends the tables with the needed graph features with a moderate increase of complexity. –  Markus Malkusch Jan 7 '14 at 16:54
    
Joining the two tables will always generate the "Result consisted of more than one row" error. Any Advice? –  Ammar Jan 9 '14 at 8:46
    
It works great but only when the ID column on the Percentage table is unique. When behaves as a foreign key (values start to repeat on more than one row) the "Result consisted of more than one row" error starts to occur.. –  Ammar Jan 10 '14 at 19:44
    
why would you have multiple percentages for an id? doesnt make sense according to your design. –  maythesource.com Jan 10 '14 at 20:59
    
No it doesn't for this very case. I am simulating a more complex scenario with this simple case. IN the actual scenario, each person has multiple accounts which in turn have the ratios. Accounts interact with each other through percentages. in short, people relates to accounts through id, and accounts relates to ratios(percentages here) through account_id, which can be either credit (+) or debit (-). so calculation should be through people's accounts and across the three tables through each one's key. similar to treating the percentages as a foreign relation. a headache i know.. –  Ammar Jan 10 '14 at 23:27

Step 1 - Create a MySQL function to return the family tree as a comma delimited TEXT column:

DELIMITER //

CREATE FUNCTION fnFamilyTree ( id INT ) RETURNS TEXT
BEGIN
   SET @tree = id;
   SET @qid = id;
   WHILE (@qid > 0) DO
      SELECT IFNULL(p.parent,-1)
        INTO @qid
        FROM people p
       WHERE p.id = @qid LIMIT 1;
      IF ( @qid > 0 ) THEN
        SET @tree = CONCAT(@tree,',',@qid);
      END IF;
   END WHILE;
   RETURN @tree;
END
//

DELIMITER ;

Then use the following SQL to retrieve your results:

SELECT ppl.id
      ,ppl.percentage
      ,GROUP_CONCAT(pct.percentage SEPARATOR '*') as Calculations
      ,EXP(SUM(LOG(pct.percentage)))              as Actual
  FROM (SELECT p1.id
              ,p2.percentage
              ,fnFamilyTree( p1.id ) as FamilyTree
          FROM people      p1
          JOIN percentages p2
            ON p2.id = p1.id
       ) ppl
  JOIN percentages pct
    ON FIND_IN_SET( pct.id, ppl.FamilyTree ) > 0
 GROUP BY ppl.id
         ,ppl.percentage
;

SQLFiddle at http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/9da5b/12

Results:

+------+----------------+-----------------+----------------+
| ID   | Percentage     | Calculations    | Actual         |
+------+----------------+-----------------+----------------+
| 1    | 0.699999988079 | 0.7             | 0.699999988079 |
| 2    | 0.600000023842 | 0.7*0.6         | 0.420000009537 |
| 3    | 0.10000000149  | 0.7*0.6*0.1     | 0.04200000158  |
| 4    | 0.5            | 0.1*0.5*0.7*0.6 | 0.02100000079  |
| 5    | 0.40000000596  | 0.4*0.7         | 0.279999999404 |
| 6    | 0.300000011921 | 0.3             | 0.300000011921 |
+------+----------------+-----------------+----------------+
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice! I especially like the multiplication through logarithm addition which is something I never considered for databases!! –  maythesource.com Jan 16 '14 at 14:51

MySQL is a Relational DBS. Your requirements needs a Graph database.

However if you stay at MySQL there exists a few methods to add a few graph features. One of them is the concept of Nested Sets. But I don't suggest that, as it adds a lot of complexity.

share|improve this answer
    
You just did! :-) –  Strawberry Jan 7 '14 at 17:19
SELECT a.id
     , ROUND(pa.percentage/100
     * COALESCE(pb.percentage/100,1)
     * COALESCE(pc.percentage/100,1)
     * COALESCE(pd.percentage/100,1) 
     * 100,2) x
  FROM people a 
  LEFT 
  JOIN people b 
    ON b.id = a.parent 
  LEFT 
  JOIN people c 
    ON c.id = b.parent 
  LEFT 
  JOIN people d 
    ON d.id = c.parent
  LEFT
  JOIN percentages pa
    ON pa.id = a.id
  LEFT
  JOIN percentages pb
    ON pb.id = b.id
  LEFT
  JOIN percentages pc
    ON pc.id = c.id
  LEFT
  JOIN percentages pd
    ON pd.id = d.id
;
share|improve this answer

Consider switching to Postgres9, which supports recursive queries:

WITH RECURSIVE recp AS (
SELECT p.id, p.name, p.parent
, array[p.id] AS anti_loop
, array[pr.percentage ] AS percentages
, pr.percentage AS final_pr
FROM people p
JOIN percentages pr ON pr.id = p.id
WHERE parent = 0
UNION ALL
SELECT ptree.id, ptree.name, ptree.parent
, recp.anti_loop || ptree.id
, recp.percentages || pr.percentage
, recp.final_pr * pr.percentage
FROM people ptree
JOIN percentages pr ON pr.id = ptree.id
JOIN recp ON recp.id = ptree.parent AND ptree.id != ALL(recp.anti_loop)
)
SELECT id, name
, array_to_string(anti_loop, ' <- ') AS path
, array_to_string(percentages::numeric(10,2)[], ' * ') AS percentages_str
, final_pr
FROM recp
ORDER BY anti_loop

Check out sqlFiddle demo

share|improve this answer
    
While it's good to know Postgres can handle it, switching to a different database is non-trivial and therefore not a viable solution. –  SQB Jan 16 '14 at 10:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.