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I want to know why this is happening: Two examples followed provides very different result and the first one actually shocks me.

Example 1:

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
    A() {
        for(int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
            for(int j = 0; j < 10000; ++j)
                m += i+j;
    }
    ~A() {}

    double m;
};

void foo()
{
    const A a;

    std::cout << a.m << std::endl;
}//foo

int main()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        foo();

    return 0;
}//main

Result:

9.999e+11
1.9998e+12
2.9997e+12
3.9996e+12
4.9995e+12
5.9994e+12
6.9993e+12
7.9992e+12
8.9991e+12
9.999e+12

Example 2:

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
    A() {
        for(int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
            for(int j = 0; j < 10000; ++j)
                m += i+j;
    }
    ~A() {}

    double m;
};

void foo()
{
    const static A a;

    std::cout << a.m << std::endl;
}//foo

int main()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        foo();

    return 0;
}//main

Result:

9.999e+11
9.999e+11
9.999e+11
9.999e+11
9.999e+11
9.999e+11
9.999e+11
9.999e+11
9.999e+11
9.999e+11

The only difference between Example1 and Example2 is the 'static'.

I admit that the first const doest not act as I expected.

Thanks in advance.


Guys, You're so right! I'm damned. So...

More importantly, is it always better to use const static local objects than only const local objects??

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

You have undefined behaviour because data member A::m has not been initialized before writing to it here:

m += i+j;

You should initialize it to something valid before writing to it. 0 seems like a good option:

A() : m(0) {
  for(int i = 0; i < 10000; ++i)
      for(int j = 0; j < 10000; ++j)
          m += i+j;
}

When you declare a static A instance, all the data members are zero-initialized, and the constructor is called the first time the program flow reaches the declaration. This masks the effect of your non-initialized data member.

Note that in C++11, you can also initialize at the point of declaration:

double m = 0;
share|improve this answer
    
oups, I'm late, +1 to you – Bruce Jan 7 '14 at 15:38

All static objects are zero-initialized. So in the second case data member m has initial value of 0.

In the first case the object of class A is default-initialized. As you did not initialize m in the constructor then it has an unspecified (arbitrary) value.

This explains the difference.

share|improve this answer

You should initialize members:

A():m(0) {
   // stuff
}
share|improve this answer

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