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Background

In my app (game) - I have a scene manager to handle the different levels. So I have:

Interface code

//Interface to allow switching scenes (works in conjunction with SceneManager class)
//Handles rendering, logic updating (on the GL rendering thread) and user input (on the main UI thread)

public interface Scene  {

void render();
void updateLogic();
boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent event);

}

SceneManager class

//Scene Manager class used in conjunction with the Scene interface.  This allows for querying of the current
//scene & changing the scene using the current instance of the manager.

public class SceneManager {

private static SceneManager Instance = new SceneManager();

private Scene currentScene;

public static SceneManager getInstance(){

    return Instance;

}

public Scene getCurrentScene(){

    return currentScene;

}

public void setCurrentScene(Scene scene){

    currentScene = scene;

}

}

So, from my Game-loop I can do something like this:

SceneManager.getInstance().getCurrentScene().updateLogic();
SceneManager.getInstance().getCurrentScene().render();

I can easily change my level by holding a simple int value and running the corresponding code through a switch statement.

switch (level){

case 1:{SceneManager.getInstance().setCurrentScene(r.level1);break


}

The problem

This works great but in a few of my levels (2 out of 20) I have a need to run a specific method, but I don't want to have to implement it in 18 levels in which it isn't required (by way of stub methods).

The other option I have is to call a switch statement on the level value while the loop is running so....

Pseudo code

If (level==5)

  callCode(5,0);

else if (level==10)

 {callCode (10,4);}

(Where levels 5 and 10 are the levels requiring this piece of code)

....but I would rather put the required method in it's corresponding level class and just call the method from the current scene as I'm not sure about using a switch (or for method) for this while the game loop itself is running flat-out - (IE, most of my switch statements come at cut scenes at the end of a level when performance isn't really an issue). Something like this:

I would much rather just do something like this:

SceneManager.getInstance().getCurrentScene().callCode();

Where the callCode method would be specific to whatever values were needed in the levels (or indeed, could simply then in turn, call a main method of common code but with differing values).

Hope I'm making sense.

Any pointers would be appreciated

Edit

Attempting to create a 2nd interface as such:

public interface Scene2 extends Scene {

    void callCode();

}

(Scene remains as above)

Then, in my class (for example say level10)

public class Level10 implements Scene2 {

    @Override
    public void render(){

        //Rendering code goes here
        mainGame.Drawsprites();  //As an example.  MainGame implements Scene and contains all my game code.  I can simply call the various methods from any of my level classes therefore I don't duplicate tons of code

    }

     @Override
    public void updateLogic(){

        //Game updates goes here (Similar to above)

    }

    @Override
    public void callCode(){

        //Level specific code here

    }

from my mainGame class:

    public void doSomething(){

        SceneManager.getInstance().getCurrentScene().callCode;

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Is this specific method a member of the Scene class, or is it a member of the SceneManager class? –  Mario Stoilov Jan 7 at 15:57
3  
Make a separate interface which has the required methods –  drees Jan 7 at 16:03
    
Put it in a superclass or change the interface. –  Dave Newton Jan 7 at 16:04
    
if the methods are specific to the scene, can you not just call them from the scene's implementation of updateLogic()? –  Rob Garwood Jan 7 at 16:07
1  
Or create a subtype for the special cases and implement a visitor pattern to do away with the switch construct. –  Rob Garwood Jan 7 at 16:17

5 Answers 5

You should define an extra layer that extends your interface. Your 2 separate scenes can then implements this interface and still be called with the more general interface.

This is a sample implementation:

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SomeInterface obj1 = new SomeClass2();
        obj1.method1();
        obj1.method2();
        SomeSubInterface obj2 = new SomeClass2();
        obj2.method1();
        obj2.method2();
        obj2.method3();
    }
}

interface SomeInterface {
    void method1();
    void method2();
}

interface SomeSubInterface extends SomeInterface {
    void method3();
}

class SomeClass1 implements SomeInterface {

    @Override
    public void method1() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    }

    @Override
    public void method2() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    }
}

class SomeClass2 implements SomeSubInterface {

    @Override
    public void method1() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub  
    }

    @Override
    public void method2() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub  
    }
    @Override
    public void method3() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have typtually attempted something like this already @JeroenVannevel but I can't seem to get it to work because my SceneManager class is working with only one Scene type (Scene in my case) so if I create another interface - say Scene2 and make my level class implement Scene2 rather than Scene, when I try to call the callCode(); method (which is in my level class) by doing this: SceneManager.getInstance().getCurrentScene().callCode(); it won't do it because the SceneManager is expecting a class which implements Scene and not Scene2 - how do I get around this? thanks –  Zippy Jan 7 at 16:28
    
You have to make your one interface extend the other one. interface Scene2 extends Scene. –  Jeroen Vannevel Jan 7 at 16:29
    
Yeah @JeroenVannevel, Scene2 does indeed extend Scene1. I'm getting the error: callCode cannot be resolved or is not a field. It gives me 2 quick fixes which are to either (1) Create field 'callCode' in type 'Scene' or (2) create constant 'callCode' in type 'Scene' –  Zippy Jan 7 at 16:34
    
Can you update your post to show some relevant code? Show the 2 interface definitions, the class declaration and the calling code. Don't forget to format your code. –  Jeroen Vannevel Jan 7 at 16:43
    
Have done so, thank you. –  Zippy Jan 7 at 16:56

Just an example showcasing the solution I proposed in the comment above. As mentioned there it achieves to things, localization of scene specific code and it removes the complexity from the general gameloop.

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scene scene1 = new NormalScene();
        Scene scene2 = new SpecialScene();

        scene1.initialize();    //Does nothing
        scene2.initialize();    //Print hello world
    }
}
abstract class Scene {
    abstract void render();
    abstract void updateLogic();
    abstract boolean onTouchEvent();
    void initialize() {

    }
}
class NormalScene extends Scene {
    @Override
    void render() {
    }
    @Override
    void updateLogic() {
    }
    @Override
    boolean onTouchEvent() {
        return true;
    }
}
class SpecialScene extends Scene {
    @Override
    void render() {
    }
    @Override
    void updateLogic() {
    }
    @Override
    boolean onTouchEvent() {
        return true;
    }
    @Override
    void initialize() {
        System.out.println("Hello world");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

As stated in my Comment, I would love an approach as the following as it perfectly fits into Android's Design and giving you the most flexibility imho:

public interface Scene  {

void render();
void updateLogic();
boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent event);

/** additional lifecycle callbacks **/
void onBeforeRender();
void onAfterRender();
void onBeforeUpdateLogic();
void onAfterUpdateLogic();
/** though the naming updateLogic associated that it is not a typicall lifecycle related method **/
}

And in your class of course the setters and getters for the eventlisteners to attach to the lifecycle events.

share|improve this answer
    
But remember the following collisions using lifecycle - callbacks: Whenever they are fully android conform, a class maybe restricted to rather implemting one of those. E.g. public interface Scene {protected void onCreate (Bundle savedInstanceState) ... –  Peter Jan 7 at 18:23
    
and SceneActivity extends Activity implements Scene /** ups **/ –  Peter Jan 7 at 18:24
    
Thanks @Peter, if I understand correctly, you mean simply add the before/after methods (or indeed, say an exraCode(); method) & simply use this method when required. Therefore these methods could perform different function depending on the needs of the specific scene? I like this as it's I similar what I was doing originally, and therefore very simple, the main difference being that I was actually going to name my method specifically and have it contain specific code). Disadvantage being that I still need to add stubs to the other 18 classes. Did I understand you correctly? Thanks :-) –  Zippy Jan 7 at 19:04
    
Yes. You would have to implement the lifecycle support both for the class handling it (mainly your Scenemanager) as well as providing a default implementation in your base class. –  Peter Jan 7 at 19:06
    
so while this may not be a general best solution to the problem described I think it fits into your concept because Scenes usually have some sort of common lifecycle events. –  Peter Jan 7 at 19:07

Distilled from the other answers and based on your comments: what I think you really want to do to minimize the Scene interface as much as possible is to add the visitor pattern into your code (it's a double dispatch design pattern). Basically for you it would mean something like (I assume here that level 2 and 4 are the level classes you want to call special methods in):

interface LevelVisitor {
    void visit(Level2 level);

    void visit(Level4 level);
}

interface Scene {
    // Other methods stay the same as you have

    accept(LevelVisitor visitor);
}

Your different levels now have a accept method (leave it empty in the classes you do not need it in 18/20 classes), above I made the LevelVisitor receive the concrete class implementations for your Level2 and Level4 classes (the two specific levels).

Let MainGame class implement LevelVisitor interface which means that there are now two new methods in the MainGame class, those receiving concrete Level2 and Level4 class implementations. So now from MainGame you call (MainGame/this gets dispatched to levels wanting it, MainGame is the visitor):

SceneManager.getInstance().getCurrentScene().accept(this);

and also you have the visit methods in MainGame

public void visit(Level2 level) {
    level.specificMethodInLevel2();
}

public void visit(Level4 level) {
    level.specificMethodInLevel4();
}

and in Level2 and Level4 classes you have the accept method with non empty implementation, like this in Level2 (Level2/this gets dispatched to visit method of MainGame):

public void accept(LevelVisitor visitor) {
    visitor.visit(this);
}

Now you could add specific methods (e.g. specificMethodInLevel2()) to both Level2 and Level4 concrete classes which are not seen from the other levels, and call them from the visit methods of your MainGame class. Also due the dispatching nature of visitor pattern you end up without the switch cases (all ''special'' levels are now handled in separate methods).

share|improve this answer
    
@Zippy I know you said you did not want to stub but I see no way out from it here, what you gain by doing the above though is that you can call specific level class methods that are not part of the interface, which is what I think you really wanted to begin with. Also due the dispatching nature of visitor pattern you end up without the switch cases. –  Magnus Jan 7 at 21:54
    
@Zippy what have you done so far? Did you solve your problem? One more idea I had is to make LevelVisitor only have one method visit(Scene2 scene) where interface Scene2 extends Scene and have specific methods your two special levels will have (they implement Scene2, that is if they are supposed to have exactly the same methods, oterhwise my current solution still stand. –  Magnus Jan 10 at 19:53

If you have your Interface Scene:

public interface Scene  {

void render();
void updateLogic();
boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent event);

}

You could define another Interface, something like:

    public interface Scene2 extends Scene {

    void callCode();

}

then in your mainGame class you can do:

public void doSomething(){

    Object currentScene = SceneManager.getInstance().getCurrentScene();
    if(currentScene instanceof Scene){
        ((Scene)currentScene).render();
        ((Scene)currentScene).updateLogic();
    }

    if(currentScene instanceof Scene2){
        ((Scene2)currentScene).allCode();

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
problem is how would this integrate into my SceneManager? (See my reply to Jeroen's answer) –  Zippy Jan 7 at 19:07
    
@Zippy check the updated answer –  Mario Stoilov Jan 8 at 9:10

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