Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm working through Bjarne Stroustrup's The C++ Programming Language and I'm stuck on one of the examples. Here's the code, and aside from whitespace differences and comments my code is identical to what's in the book (p.51).

enum class Traffic_light { green, yellow, red};
int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    Traffic_light light = Traffic_light::red;
//    DEFINING OPERATORS FOR ENUM CLASSES
//    enum classes don't have all the operators, must define them manually.
    Traffic_light& operator++(Traffic_light& t) {
        switch (t) {
            case Traffic_light::green:
                return t = Traffic_light::yellow;
            case Traffic_light::yellow:
                return t = Traffic_light::red;
            case Traffic_light::red:
                return t = Traffic_light::green;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}

Yet when I compile it with clang++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++ -Weverything main.cpp on Mac OS X 10.9 I get the following errors:

main.cpp:24:9: error: expected expression
        switch (t) {
        ^
main.cpp:32:6: error: expected ';' at end of declaration
    }
     ^
     ;

The real baffeler is the expected expression error, but the expected ; is problematic as well. What have I done?

share|improve this question
10  
You are trying to define a function inside a function. You can't. – user529758 Jan 7 '14 at 16:19
2  
Just do it outside your main function... – Adriano Repetti Jan 7 '14 at 16:20
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Traffic_light& operator++(Traffic_light& t) is a function with name operator ++. Each function shall be defined outside any other function. So place the definition of the operator before main.

share|improve this answer
    
That's the issue. Thanks. I'm used to languages like JavaScript where you can put functions where ever the heck you want. I'll accept the answer as soon as StackOverflow lets me. (stupid time delay) – Jonathan Jan 7 '14 at 16:27

Here you have your code running:

http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/74c0cbc5a8c48e47

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

enum class Traffic_light { 
    green, 
    yellow, 
    red
};

Traffic_light & operator++(Traffic_light & t) {
    switch (t) {
        case Traffic_light::green:
            t = Traffic_light::yellow;
        break;
        case Traffic_light::yellow:
            t = Traffic_light::red;
        break;
        case Traffic_light::red:
            t = Traffic_light::green;
        break;
    }
    return t;
}

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, Traffic_light & t)
{
    switch(t)
    {
        case Traffic_light::green:
            os << "green";
        break;
        case Traffic_light::yellow:
            os << "yellow";
        break;
        case Traffic_light::red:
            os << "red";
        break;
    }
    return os;

}

int main()
{
    Traffic_light light = Traffic_light::red;

    std::cout << "Ligth:" << ++light << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Ligth:" << ++light << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Ligth:" << ++light << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You have a couple of problems:

First, you are attempting to implement a function (operator++) inside another function (main). C++ does not allow this (with the exception of lambdas).

Second, you are only implementing a prefix increment, so ++light will work, but light++ will not. You should implement them both. An example of it can be found here.

share|improve this answer
    
C/C++ alow to declare one function within another function. They do not allow to define a function. – Vlad from Moscow Jan 7 '14 at 16:44
    
@VladfromMoscow Ah, good catch. Let me fix the wording. – Zac Howland Jan 7 '14 at 16:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.