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I trying to color a surface known only by its corner according to its Y value with Mayavi. Original, I I succeed in making the same thing with matplotlib (here) but I put back this canonical on my real data, the rendering was not sufficient and therefore I am trying now with Mayavi. I found the example from Surface from irregular data example which is quite helpful. However when applied to my case, reproduce here on this simple case, the triangulation gets wrong as seen on the figure below for the left surface, with two lower triangles instead of an upper and a lower triangle as for the right surface.

enter image description here

I figure out that it came from the position of the second Y-vertices however I want to find a more general solution to 1) avoid this wrongful triangulation and 2) to have a more smooth surface by interpolating between each corner like in my previous post and avoid as much as possible thus the fold seen on the right surface, due to the splitting of my surface in only two triangles. Any ideas about doing this with Mayavi?

Here is the code I used to generate this simple example:

#!/usr/bin/env python
#-*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import numpy
from mayavi import mlab

X1 = numpy.array([0, 0, 1, 1])
Y1 = numpy.array([0.5, 0.75, 1, 0.5])
Z1 = numpy.array([0, 1, 0.5,0])

X2 = numpy.array([0, 0, 1, 1])
Y2 = numpy.array([-0.5, -0.45, -1, -0.5])
Z2 = numpy.array([0, 1, 0.5,0])

fig = mlab.figure(1, bgcolor=(1, 1, 1), fgcolor=(0.5, 0.5, 0.5))
# Building the working triangulation
# Define the points in 3D space
# including color code based on Z coordinate.
pts = mlab.points3d(X1, Y1, Z1, Y1, colormap='jet')
# Triangulate based on X, Y with Delaunay 2D algorithm.
# Save resulting triangulation.
mesh = mlab.pipeline.delaunay2d(pts)
# Remove the point representation from the plot
pts.remove()
# Draw a surface based on the triangulation
surf = mlab.pipeline.surface(mesh, colormap='jet')

# Building the buggus triangulation
pts = mlab.points3d(X2, Y2, Z2, Y2, colormap='jet')
# Triangulate based on X, Y with Delaunay 2D algorithm.
# Save resulting triangulation.
mesh = mlab.pipeline.delaunay2d(pts)
# Remove the point representation from the plot
pts.remove()
# Draw a surface based on the triangulation
surf = mlab.pipeline.surface(mesh, colormap='jet')

# Simple plot.
mlab.outline(extent=(0,1,-1,1,0,1))
mlab.axes(extent=(0,1,-1,1,0,1), nb_labels=3)
mlab.show()
share|improve this question
    
What triangulation of the second set of points did you expect? –  lrineau Jan 8 at 11:11
    
The same as the mirror one.... one lower and one upper triangle and not two lower triangles –  TazgerO Jan 8 at 14:06
    
After your last edit, the question starts with "4I", instead of "I". I cannot modify that typo, because the modification is too short. –  lrineau Jan 8 at 15:21
    
Edited... Thanks :D –  TazgerO Jan 8 at 15:33

2 Answers 2

You are using different arrays compared to your matplotlib example.

matplotlib example:

 z = numpy.array([0, **0.5, 1,** 0])

here:

 Z1 = numpy.array([0, **1, 0.5**,0])

With the correct z array the plot looks similar to your matplotlib example, including interpolation to get a smoother color transition.

share|improve this answer

The function mlab.pipeline.delaunay2d computes a 2D Delaunay triangulation of the set of points. That means that the triangles that are created depend only on the X and Y coordinates of the points, ignore the Z.

The two different triangulations you get are the awaited ones, as far as I have understood. Maybe there was a typo in your second data set, and that would explain why you are surprised. Did you meant the following?

X2 = numpy.array([0, 0, 1, 1])
Y2 = numpy.array([-0.5, -0.75, -1, -0.5])
Z2 = numpy.array([0, 1, 0.5,0])

The difference is the second coordinate of Y2 which is -0.75 instead of -0.45.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed there is a typo mistake in Y1. You should read 0.45... I will correct the original post. With 0.75 everything works great except that the fold is still quite visible and I want to smooth it abit... –  TazgerO Jan 8 at 14:23
    
Unfortunately, the shape of the triangulation is guided only by the X and Y coordinates of the points, and what you see really depends on the Z coordinate. The example Surface from irregular data example uses the fact that the data set projects nicely on the 2D plan. –  lrineau Jan 8 at 14:27
    
I take back my previous comment as with 0.45 for Y1, both triangulation are works. Instead let see the problem as the left triangulation and I want something like the right with two nice triangles... –  TazgerO Jan 8 at 14:32
    
Well the triangulation might be better if using X and Z coordinates then... I read some stuff about some filters a while ago to do so, but I can't remember where... –  TazgerO Jan 8 at 14:36

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