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Can some one tell me what does this statement means exactly. How does this work as a condition in if statement.

if(i&j)

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closed as off-topic by Shafik Yaghmour, πάντα ῥεῖ, user2864740, Josh Crozier, codeMagic Jan 7 '14 at 20:15

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If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
By itself, nothing. It's choosing whether the next line (group) will be executed. Just like any if statement. (bit & with bit shift << is a common way to check if a bit is set or not.) –  user645280 Jan 7 '14 at 19:16
2  
Well, the edit made the answers obsolete. –  luk32 Jan 7 '14 at 19:19
    
@user2864740 Yea, I dunno the reason, but I think the comment is worth it. Not sure if question will be closed, but as of now, over half of the answers make no sense. –  luk32 Jan 7 '14 at 19:23

5 Answers 5

It executes the next line if the bitwise and between i and 1 shifted to the left by j is true.

I.e. if the j'th bit of i is set.

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It's an if check to see if the variable i has the jth bit set.

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The j variable needs to be the value of the bit. For example, bit 3 has the value of 8. –  Thomas Matthews Jan 7 '14 at 20:40

If ( i & j ), executes a bitwise 'and', then relies on the fact that 0 is taken as False and non-zero is taken as True.

Bitwise and operations take the binary representations of two numbers and return a number whose binary representation only has 1's where both of the inputs had 1's.

A few examples of the bitwise and operations:

0b0011 & 0b1100 gives 0b0000
0b0011 & 0b0010 gives 0b0010
0b1011 & 0b1101 gives 0b1001

So, bitwise and essentially only gives non-zero if the two numbers representations have bits that overlap.

An example of zero vs non-zero used in if statements can be seen in the following code:

#include<iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

int main()
{
    int zeroVal = 0;
    int nonZeroVal1 = 1;
    int nonZeroVal2 = 10;

    if(!zeroVal)
    { cout<<zeroVal<<" is false"<<endl; }
    else
    { cout<<zeroVal<<" is true"<<endl; }

    if(nonZeroVal1)
    { cout<<nonZeroVal1<<" is true"<<endl; }
    else
    { cout<<nonZeroVal1<<" is false"<<endl; }

    if(nonZeroVal2)
    { cout<<nonZeroVal2<<" is true"<<endl; }
    else
    { cout<<nonZeroVal2<<" is false"<<endl; }

    return 0;
}

This code has the output of:

0 is false
1 is true
10 is true

So basically the code is asking if i and j have any set bits in the same place.

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Non-zero is taken as false?! Yowsa, what language you been stuck with? (unary is so much tougher to program than binary) –  user645280 Jan 7 '14 at 19:22
    
It was a typo, sorry about that, if you look I wrote false twice. Correcting now. Thanks for spotting that. –  James Matta Jan 7 '14 at 19:29

It is bitwise operator AND that may be applied to entegral or unscoped enumeration types.

for example

1 & 1 = 1
1 & 0 = 0
0 & 1 = 0
0 & 0 = 0

This expression in the if statement

if(i&j)

checks whether two numbers have corresponding bits that both are set to 1.

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I would word it "any of the 1 bits overlap". –  luk32 Jan 7 '14 at 19:22
    
Oh, my English is bad. –  Vlad from Moscow Jan 7 '14 at 19:24
    
Oh, it's nothing about english, I just thought as a different interpretation, the statements are equivalent. I believe. Well maybe not even interpretaion but ... yea wording. I think some might find easier to grasp yours and some the alternative. I wouldn't even say mine's better just different. –  luk32 Jan 7 '14 at 19:28
    
The problem is that usually I have very restrictive possibilities to find appropriate English words that to make a different interpretation.:) –  Vlad from Moscow Jan 7 '14 at 19:30

With the edit, it will execute the if condition if i & j is non-zero. If i and j are integers, any matching, non-zero, bits between i and j will cause i & j to be non-zero.

Examples:

(i)      0010
(j)      0010
(i & j)  0010 (evaluates to !false)

(i)      0010
(j)      0001
(i & j)  0000 (evaluates to false)

(i)      1111
(j)      0010
(i & j)  0010 (evaluates to !false)

etc.
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And if they are not integers, will it behave differently? Also it's not any matching bits, but only the 1s, matching 0s will do nothing. Side-note: !false is a fun way to say true =) –  luk32 Jan 7 '14 at 19:31
    
@luk32 It won't necessarily behave differently, but since I was using a byte sized example, I specified it. !false is more accurate in this case as true could imply 1, which is not what 0010 equals. –  Zac Howland Jan 7 '14 at 19:34
    
I think bit-wise operations are defined only for integer types in c and c++. Size has nothing to do here. Also, I am pretty sure that standard says that anything non-zero evaluates to true. Why would you imply it's 1. –  luk32 Jan 8 '14 at 7:50
    
@luk32 1111 is non-zero, as is 0001. !false simply means "Not Zero", as opposed to saying is true. A value cannot be equal to 2 unique values at the same time, but 2 unique values can be non-equal to some other value. The semantics are more important if you actually specified the criteria, i & j == true would not work, but i & j != false would - Example. –  Zac Howland Jan 8 '14 at 16:11
    
Additionally, you can define bitwise operations for other types. –  Zac Howland Jan 8 '14 at 16:13

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