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So there is a method for NaN, but divide by zero creates infinity or negative infinity.

There is a method for Infinity (also positive infinite and negative infinity).

What I want is IsARealNumber function that returns true when the value is an expressible number.

Obviously I can write my own...

public bool IsARealNumber(double test)
{
    if (double.IsNaN(test)) return false;
    if (double.IsInfinity(test)) return false;
    return true;
}

but it doesn't seem like I should have to.

share|improve this question
2  
Seems pretty simple to me: return !double.IsNaN(test) && !double.IsInfinity(test); // In the 3.5 framework you can even make it an extension method. –  GalacticCowboy Jan 19 '10 at 23:51
2  
And now that you've written it, you'll never have to write it again :-) –  paxdiablo Jan 19 '10 at 23:52
    
doesn't it seem like it should be in there? @GalacticCowboy, I've just noticed extension methods, how do I add that? –  Joel Barsotti Jan 19 '10 at 23:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To add it as an extension method, it has to be a static member of a static class.

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static bool IsARealNumber(this double test)
    {
        return !double.IsNaN(test) && !double.IsInfinity(test);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
awesome, thanks. –  Joel Barsotti Jan 20 '10 at 0:03
    
Am I right in assuming that you can only add these ExtensionMethods to objects, and not hang them off the class proper. Like double.IsNaN(double) is? –  Joel Barsotti Jan 20 '10 at 2:13
    
I believe that is correct. It uses the type of the "this" parameter to determine what it applies to, and I doubt it's allowed to be static (so as to hang it off the class as a static member). –  GalacticCowboy Jan 20 '10 at 12:03

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