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  • min 3 letters
  • max 15
  • characters A-Za-z0-9
  • special charaters @#$%^&+=

This is what I have:

Regex.IsMatch(Password.Text, @"^[A-Za-z0-9@#$%^&+=]{3,15}$ ")

It always returns false.

Please help.

share|improve this question
    
Offtopic, but what if I would like to use <> in my password for more security? or more than 15 characters? (I actually have a password that is longer than that used in ultrasecure cases) –  Earlz Jan 20 '10 at 0:11
1  
@aloo - you've got an underscore between the A and the Z - so you're not matching on B-Y; also 215 - should that be 15? Or are those posting typos? –  martin clayton Jan 20 '10 at 0:12
2  
A-Z instead of A_Z –  moonshadow Jan 20 '10 at 0:12
1  
@moonshadow, why not make an answer instead of comment? –  Earlz Jan 20 '10 at 0:13
1  
How many of normal chars? How many of special chars? You didn't cover that in both your requirements and the regex. This would make abc valid. –  BalusC Jan 20 '10 at 0:13

3 Answers 3

Take out the space at the end of the regular expression string. Also: corrected probable typos.

Regex.IsMatch(Password.Text, @"^[A-Za-z0-9@#$%^&+=]{3,15}$")
share|improve this answer
    
didn't he also mean for it to be ^[A-Z... ? –  Earlz Jan 20 '10 at 0:22

Why on earth do you want to restrict possible passwords?!?

  • Why forbid french and german characters (unicode in general)?
  • Why limit passwords to 15 chars? A lot of people use whole passphrases.
  • Why limit the special characters? Why do you rule out . and :?
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for your post. -1 for not answering the actual question.. –  Earlz Jan 20 '10 at 0:22

As mentioned, this is a very very bad idea. The much better approach would be to test the password strength of the entered password and set a score passwords have to beat.

There are algorithms to compute the strength of passwords. The following is taken from the Delphi Encryption Compendium by Hagen Reddmann (an thus in Pascal, but i guess this can be translated easily)

function PassphraseQuality(const Password: String): Extended; 
// returns computed Quality in range 0.0 to 1.0 
// source extracted from Delphi Encryption Compendium, DEC 

  function Entropy(P: PByteArray; L: Integer): Extended; 
  var 
    Freq: Extended; 
    I: Integer; 
    Accu: array[Byte] of LongWord; 
  begin 
    Result := 0.0; 
    if L <= 0 then Exit; 
    FillChar(Accu, SizeOf(Accu), 0); 
    for I := 0 to L-1 do Inc(Accu[P[I]]); 
    for I := 0 to 255 do 
      if Accu[I] <> 0 then 
      begin 
        Freq := Accu[I] / L; 
        Result := Result - Freq * (Ln(Freq) / Ln(2)); 
      end; 
  end; 

  function Differency: Extended; 
  var 
    S: String; 
    L,I: Integer; 
  begin 
    Result := 0.0; 
    L := Length(Password); 
    if L <= 1 then Exit; 
    SetLength(S, L-1); 
    for I := 2 to L do 
      Byte(S[I-1]) := Byte(Password[I-1]) - Byte(Password[I]); 
    Result := Entropy(Pointer(S), Length(S)); 
  end; 

  function KeyDiff: Extended; 
  const 
    Table = '^1234567890ß´qwertzuiopü+asdfghjklöä#<yxcvbnm,.-°!"§$%&/()=?`QWERTZUIOPÜ*ASDFGHJKLÖÄ''>YXCVBNM;:_'; 
  var 
    S: String; 
    L,I,J: Integer; 
  begin 
    Result := 0.0; 
    L := Length(Password); 
    if L <= 1 then Exit; 
    S := Password; 
    UniqueString(S); 
    for I := 1 to L do 
    begin 
      J := Pos(S[I], Table); 
      if J > 0 then S[I] := Char(J); 
    end; 
    for I := 2 to L do 
      Byte(S[I-1]) := Byte(S[I-1]) - Byte(S[I]); 
    Result := Entropy(Pointer(S), L-1); 
  end; 

const 
  GoodLength = 10.0; // good length of Passphrases 
var 
  L: Extended; 
begin 
  Result := Entropy(Pointer(Password), Length(Password)); 
  if Result <> 0 then 
  begin 
    Result := Result * (Ln(Length(Password)) / Ln(GoodLength)); 
    L := KeyDiff + Differency; 
    if L <> 0 then L := L / 64; 
    Result := Result * L; 
    if Result < 0 then Result := -Result; 
    if Result > 1 then Result := 1; 
  end; 
end;
share|improve this answer
1  
Indeed. the 'password' library for Ruby makes it easy to check password strength. The library calls cracklib, which does many more and better checks than most programmers will want to do. For example, it will check that the password is not a dictionary word. –  Wayne Conrad Jan 20 '10 at 0:25
    
My purpose is to prevent cross browser scripting .If anybody can tell me how i can do that for a password field. –  Dotnet Rocks Jan 20 '10 at 0:29
    
@aloo: If this password is never displayed on a page (which is should never be anyways), then cross site scripting is not a problem. The real problem is SQL injection (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQL_injection), which you can prevent by writing proper SQL queries (see the wiki page). –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 20 '10 at 0:34
    
THanks for all your answers.After reading BlueRaja's comment, it makes sense not to add restriction to password field. –  Dotnet Rocks Jan 20 '10 at 1:02

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