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As a Python beginner, I'm having real issues moving files around. Below is a script I've finally(!) made work which simply moves select files from a directory of choice to a new folder. For some reason which I cannot fathom, it only worked once, then the destination folder created was really bizarre. At one point it created a 'directory' that was an unknown application with the correct name and at other times it creates a text file using seemingly random files to generate the content - again the file it creates is correctly named.

Here is the relevant script:

#!/usr/bin/python

import os, shutil

def file_input(file_name):                
    newlist = []                                                #create new list
    for names in os.listdir(file_name):                         #loops through directory
        if names.endswith(".txt") or names.endswith(".doc"):    #returns only extensions required    
            full_file_name = os.path.join(file_name, names)     #creates full file path name - required for further file modification
            newlist.append(full_file_name)                      #adds item to list
            dst = os.path.join(file_name + "/target_files")
            full_file_name = os.path.join(file_name, names)
            if (os.path.isfile(full_file_name)):
                print "Success!"
                shutil.copy(full_file_name, dst)

def find_file():
    file_name = raw_input("\nPlease carefully input full directory pathway.\nUse capitalisation as necessary.\nFile path: ")
    file_name = "/root/my-documents"                            #permanent input for testing!
    return file_input(file_name)
    '''try:
        os.path.exists(file_name)
        file_input(file_name)
    except (IOError, OSError):
        print "-" * 15
        print "No file found.\nPlease try again."
        print "-" * 15
        return find_file()'''

find_file()

Can someone please tell me why this script is not reproducible when I delete the folder created and try to run it again and what I can do to make that happen?

I know it's a bit messy, but this is going to part of a larger script and I'm still in first draft stages!!

Many thanks

share|improve this question
    
if (os.path.isfile(full_file_name)): checks for the existence of the target file. BTW, clean up your code! Strange names, unneeded parenthesis, return without reason, ... that's not "a bit messy", that's a mess. –  Matthias Jan 7 '14 at 22:30
    
no it checks for the source file, file_name is never modified nor names –  praveen Jan 7 '14 at 22:36
    
Sorry if it confused you Matthius. As I said, it's a rough copy in working. You're right though, I should have tidied it up before posting to make things clearer. A lot of the unnecessary bits and 'strange names' are there to allow me to follow what's going on and not relevant to this portion of script or left over from previous attempts to make it work. This is the first post I've made to SO, I apologize for the tardiness –  user3103208 Jan 7 '14 at 23:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This works:

import os, shutil

def file_input(file_name):                
    newlist = []                                                #create new list
    for names in os.listdir(file_name):                         #loops through directory
        if names.endswith(".txt") or names.endswith(".doc"):    #returns only extensions required    
            full_file_name = os.path.join(file_name, names)     #creates full file path name - required for further file modification
            newlist.append(full_file_name)                      #adds item to list
            dst = os.path.join(file_name + "/target_files")

            if not os.path.exists(dst):
                os.makedirs(dst)

            full_file_name = os.path.join(file_name, names)
            if (os.path.exists(full_file_name)):
                print "Success!"
                shutil.copy(full_file_name, dst)

def find_file():
    file_name = raw_input("\nPlease carefully input full directory pathway.\nUse capitalisation as necessary.\nFile path: ")
    file_name = "/home/praveen/programming/trash/documents"                            #permanent input for testing!
    return file_input(file_name)

find_file()

You need to check if your copy destination directory actually exists, if not create it. shutil.copy would then copy your file to that directory

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Praveen! That was the bit missing. I got confused with the shutil function - all documentation I've seen said that the destination folder shouldn't exist before you try to send it there! Trial and error!! –  user3103208 Jan 7 '14 at 23:02

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