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I am learning js inheritance and prototyping and my naming is probably totally off i am sorry for that.

i am trying to create a super object and prototype 2 sub object as properties and then inside one of the sub object call a function that is found in the other. it doesn't work for some reason.

UPDATE

my goal in here is: I am trying to make a small game - for fun and practice. My plan was to have 1 basic object called(object) that has positioning and other properties (that every other object will have) another object called(controls) for controls. Only objects that can move will have that object as well.

players are also objects and they will have both "object" and "controls". as their prototype.

Hope that cleared things a bit.

Code:

    // sub Object1
function object(){
    this.speed = 1;
    this.walkDistant = 5;

}

// sub Object2
function controls(){
    this.moveLeft = function(){
        console.log(this.speed , this.walkDistant);
        return this.speed * this.walkDistant;
    }
}

// super Object
function player(){
    // DoesNothing
}

player.prototype.object  = new object();
player.prototype.controls  = new controls();

var firstPlayer = new player();
console.log(firstPlayer.controls.moveLeft());

Or if you prefer fiddle : http://jsfiddle.net/rMaKa/1/

share|improve this question
1  
Could you explain what you are trying to achieve? –  diolemo Jan 7 at 23:38
    
It doesn't make much sense, I think you're mixing things... –  elclanrs Jan 7 at 23:39
    
possible duplicate of Multiple inheritance/prototypes in JavaScript –  Niels Keurentjes Jan 7 at 23:46
    
I've update my post with a more detailed explanation probably should have included it from the beginning –  Neta Meta Jan 7 at 23:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because a Player can be controlled you can mix in Controls with Player. Your object constructor function is a badly chosen name because a constructor function should start with a capital making it Object and you'd overwrite window.Object (bad idea). For this reason I've renamed it to Base. Player is a Base object and can be controlled so inherits from Base and has Controls mixed in.

For more information about constructor functions, mix ins, instance members and prototype check this link.

function Base() {
  this.speed = 1;
  this.walkDistant = 5;
}

// sub Object2
function Controls() {
}
Controls.prototype.moveLeft = function() {
  console.log(this.speed, this.walkDistant);
  return this.speed * this.walkDistant;
}

// super Object
function Player() {
  //make player have Base instance members
  Base.call(this);
  //make player heve Controls instance members
  Controls.call(this);
}
//player is a base object
Player.prototype = Object.create(Base.prototype);
//repair constrictor
Player.prototype.constructor = Player;
//Player can be controlled, copy controls prototype on player (mixin)
// this would be better suited in a helper function, see link posted in answer
var stuff;
for (stuff in Controls.prototype) {
  if (Controls.prototype.hasOwnProperty(stuff)) {
    Player.prototype[stuff] = Controls.prototype[stuff];
  }
}

var firstPlayer = new Player();

console.log(firstPlayer.moveLeft());

If you want the player to have controls you can try something like this:

function Controls(what) {
  //what do we need to control
  this.controlWhat=what;
}
Controls.prototype.moveLeft = function() {
  console.log(this.controlWhat.speed, this.controlWhat.walkDistant);
  return this.controlWhat.speed * this.controlWhat.walkDistant;
};

function Player() {
  this.speed = 1;
  this.walkDistant = 5;
  this.controls=new Controls(this);
}
var firstPlayer = new Player();

console.log(firstPlayer.controls.moveLeft());
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer very much, mind explaining why did you do Player.prototype.constructor = Player; ? and why not just using new instead of Player.prototype = Object.create(Base.prototype); //repair constrictor ? –  Neta Meta Jan 8 at 2:35
    
The link I posted should answer both questions –  HMR Jan 8 at 7:03
    
yes it did, thanks very much seems things doesnt work exactly as i thought –  Neta Meta Jan 8 at 17:07

The problem is that you are trying to access a property that pertences to subObj1 from subObj2, but is the superObj that inherit both.

To achieve that, you should make your subObj1 inherit the subObj2.

// sub Object1
function name(){
    this.name = function(){
        var myName = 'FirstName';
        console.log(myName, this.last.lastName);
    }

    this.callName = function(){
        this.name();
    };
}

// sub Object2
function lastName(){
    this.lastName ='someLastName';
}

// super Object
function fullName(){
    // DoesNothing
}

name.prototype.last  = new lastName();
fullName.prototype.name  = new name();

var myName = new fullName();
myName.name.callName();

You can see this fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
This would add the lastName() functionality to all name() objects. If I understood correct I don't think that is wanted. –  diolemo Jan 8 at 0:10
    
i dont want sub object 1 and subobject 2 to be related, they are 2 separate objects, their only relation is through the super object. –  Neta Meta Jan 8 at 0:12
    
@NetaMeta Child object can access properties from their parents, but not from another childs. You should move your moveLeft method to your super class to achieve what you want (but that does not make sense either). I think that we have a problem related to the OO concept instead of JS specific. –  Beterraba Jan 8 at 0:15
    
what you mean related to the oo concept. what approach should i take instead? –  Neta Meta Jan 8 at 0:19
    
@NetaMeta You are on the right way, but I think that you should rethink your classes. controls is using information that exists on the object class, what seems, to me, that controls should inherit object. Or you can put this information on player or on controls itself. –  Beterraba Jan 8 at 0:24

You can use Mixins to extend the functionality of an object using functionality already implemented in other objects. You could also have it that the sub-objects know about the super object as below.

function subClassA(containerClass) {
    this.containerClass = containerClass;
    this.methodA = function() {
        console.log(this.containerClass.b.methodB());
    }
}

function subClassB(containerClass) {
    this.containerClass = containerClass;
    this.methodB = function() {
        return 12345;
    }
}

function containerClass() {
    this.a = new subClassA(this);
    this.b = new subClassB(this);
}

var cc = new containerClass();
cc.a.methodA();

The Mixin approach would look something like this:

// extend function to add mixin support
function extend(destination, source) {
    for (var k in source) 
      if (source.hasOwnProperty(k))
        destination[k] = source[k];
    return destination;
}

function subClassA() { }
subClassA.prototype.methodA = function() {
    console.log(this.methodB());
};

function subClassB() { }
subClassB.prototype.methodB = function() {
    return 12345;
};

function superClass() {
    // ----------------
}

// add the subClassA and subClassB functionality
extend(superClass.prototype, subClassA.prototype);
extend(superClass.prototype, subClassB.prototype);

var sc = new superClass();
sc.methodA();
share|improve this answer
    
yea I've done something like that before i was sure that there's a way to do it with prototype i mean both of the objects are under the same parent how comes they dont know of eachother ? –  Neta Meta Jan 8 at 0:02
    
@NetaMeta The shouldn't know about each other. It just doesn't work like that. –  diolemo Jan 8 at 0:04
    
@NetaMeta I have updated the answer to include a solution using Mixins. See if this is more suitable for you. –  diolemo Jan 8 at 0:17
    
Your mixin example would not work if you update subClassa.prototype after you've used it –  Neta Meta Jan 9 at 0:21

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