Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Let's say I have the following array of arrays:

A = [
  ['a', 'b', 'c'],
  ['d', 'e', 'f'],
  ['g', 'h'],
  ['i'],
  ['j', 'k', 'l']
]

I want to find all possible combinations of the elements of each array with the elements of the other arrays (i.e. 'adgij' is one possibility but not 'abcde').

I can brute force it and just loop everything like this (javascript):

var A = [
      ['a', 'b', 'c'],
      ['d', 'e', 'f'],
      ['g', 'h'],
      ['i'],
      ['j', 'k', 'l']
    ],
    combinations,
    newCombinations = [];

A.forEach(function(a, index) {
  newCombinations = [];

  if (index === 0) {
    newCombinations = a;
  } else {
    a.forEach(function(val){
      combinations.forEach(function(combination){
        newCombinations.push(combination + val);
      });
    });
  }

  combinations = newCombinations;
});

The problem with this method is that it is breadth-first, so if I want to stop after n iterations I would have incomplete combinations.

Is there a way to get all possible combinations using depth-first method?

share|improve this question
    
If I understand the question correctly, you should search for "depth-first cartesian product". Here is one link I found: gist.github.com/andreasvc/5455646 –  Raman Jan 8 '14 at 2:19
    
This might be a duplicate of: stackoverflow.com/questions/3621268/… –  Raman Jan 8 '14 at 2:22

2 Answers 2

A simple recursive function in pseudo-code.

I hope it's pretty self-explanatory.

Each recursive step picks one of the elements from the current index's array, and calls the function for the next index.

current can just be a list.

someFunction(A, {}, 0)

someFunction(A, current, index)
  if index == A.length
    print current
    return
  for each element e in A[index]
    current.addToBack(e)
    someFunction(A, current, index + 1)
    current.removeLast(e)
share|improve this answer

I've basically created a map (for instance [0,0,0,0,0] would select all first members in your list of lists while [2,2,1,0,2] will select all last members) in python to numbers and then translated back to the list. It's a bit tricky but I hope I'm right:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import itertools

def map_good_opt(good_opt, A):
    return [i[1][i[0]] for i in zip(good_opt, A)]

if "__main__" == __name__:

    # your list of lists    
    A = [
          ['a', 'b', 'c'],
          ['d', 'e', 'f'],
          ['g', 'h'],
          ['i'],
          ['j', 'k', 'l']
        ]

    # this part generates all options (a bit more actually...)
    m = max(len(a) for a in A)
    print "m : %d" % m
    nums = range(m)
    print "nums: %r" % str(nums)
    opts = itertools.product(nums, repeat=len(A))       

    # now we have all number 00000 - 33333
    # we don't want 33333 or anything higher than len(A[i]) for each list in A 
    opts = itertools.product(nums, repeat=len(A))
    # this removes all bad options... (I hope :D)
    good_opts = [opt for opt in opts if len([i for i in range(len(A)) if (opt[i] < len(A[i]))]) == len(A)]

    # and we're left with the good options
    for opts in good_opts:
        print str(opt)
    print "GO: %d" % len(good_opts)
    for g in good_opts:
        print str("OPTIONS: " + str(g))
        print str("MAPPED TO: " + str(map_good_opt(g,A)))
    print "done."

I only did this to learn itertools and zip which I've recently learned here in Stackoverflow, and your question looked interesting enough to test this on :) Good luck.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.