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I a utilizing the StartCoroutine method of Unity3D (the game development application), and I have a question concerning nested coroutines.

Typically, nested coroutines might look something like this:

void Start() { StartCoroutine(OuterCoroutine()); }

IEnumerator OuterCoroutine()
{
    //Do Some Stuff . . .
    yield return StartCoroutine(InnerCoroutine());
    //Finish Doing Stuff . . .
}

IEnumerator InnerCoroutine()
{
    //Do some other stuff . . .
    yield return new WaitForSeconds(2f);
    //Finish Doing that other stuff . . .
}

That's all well and fine, but it's really not necessary. The same effect can be achieved like this:

void Start() { StartCoroutine(OuterCoroutine()); }

IEnumerator OuterCoroutine()
{
    //Do Some Stuff . . .
    IEnumerator innerCoroutineEnumerator = InnerCoroutine().GetEnumerator();
    while(innerCoroutineEnumerator.MoveNext())
        yield return innerCoroutineEnumerator.Current;
    //Finish Doing Stuff . . .
}

IEnumerable InnerCoroutine()
{
    //Do some other stuff . . .
    yield return new WaitForSeconds(2f);
    //Finish Doing that other stuff . . .
}

I have found this method produces less garbage (which can be an issue in Unity) than having multiple StartCoroutines; therefore it is very useful, especially when dealing with many nested layers.

Now for my question.

Instead of using IEnumerable InnerCoroutine(){} and getting the enumerator like so:

IEnumerator innerCoroutineEnumerator = InnerCoroutine().GetEnumerator(); 

I'd like to use IEnumerator InnerCoroutine(){} and get the enumerator like this:

IEnumerator innerCoroutineEnumerator = InnerCoroutine();

In addition to being faster in my testing, this method will allow me to use the "inner coroutine" method via the normal StartCoroutine method, which might useful down the road.

I have done testing, and as far as I can tell, both techniques are effectively doing the same thing, but I am still relatively new at this whole coding thing, so there is the chance that I am missing something.

So are they the same?

Thanks!

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