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I've got an ordered list, and I'm trying to make zebra stripes for its background. I'm using a repeating linear gradient for the background, but I keep running into a really weird bug in chrome. The long the list is, the blurrier the stripes get; it's usable when there's less than ~50 items, but gets too blurry to recognize after that. When there's less than 10 items, it's really crisp.

html:

<ul class="test">
   <li class="subtest">foo</li>
   <li class="subtest">bar</li>
   <li class="subtest">baz</li>
   <li class="subtest">foo</li>
   <li class="subtest">bar</li>
   <li class="subtest">baz</li>
   etc...
</ul>

css:

.test{

        background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(
              180deg,
              #ffffff 0px,
              #ffffff 50px,
              #f5f5f5 50px,
              #f5f5f5 100px);
}
.subtest{
    height:50px;
}

jsfiddle for example: http://jsfiddle.net/yLLF2/

Remove some elements from the list to see how it's supposed to look.

I originally had it working by styling the elements directly with :nth-of-type(2n), but users can dynamically hide/show elements, which breaks that implementation.

The bug only appears in chrome. Is there any way to fix this? Googling got me nowhere.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are not stating the size of the background. Should be:

.test {
    background-image: repeating-linear-gradient(
          180deg,
          #ffffff 0px,
          #ffffff 50px,
          #f5f5f5 50px,
          #f5f5f5 100px);
    background-size: 100% 100px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It works! Thanks so much. I thought this was just a bug I would have to put up with. –  sfendell Jan 8 at 18:23

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