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I'm getting syntax errors when trying to do some simple calculations in a bash shell script. Obviously I'm doing it wrong but hopefully someone can point me in the right direction.

diffSec=`expr $diff % 60`              # works fine
diffMin=`expr $diff / 60 % 60`         # works fine
diffHr=`expr $diff / (60 * 60)`        # giving me problems due to the parens
testerme=`expr $diff / 3600`           # works fine but will use only as a work around
diffDay=`expr $diff / (60 * 60 * 24)`  # problems again

This is the syntax error I get:

./testscript.sh: command substitution: line 27: syntax error near unexpected token `('
./testscript.sh: command substitution: line 27: `expr $diff / (60 * 60)'
./testscript.sh: command substitution: line 29: syntax error near unexpected token `('
./testscript.sh: command substitution: line 29: `expr $diff / (60 * 60 * 24)'

How do i execute things within parenthesis such that I don't get a syntax error? Thanks in advance for your help.

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1  
man expr: " Beware that many operators need to be escaped or quoted for shells." => expr $diff / \(60 \* 60 \* 24 \) –  Wrikken Jan 8 at 3:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may use $(( ))

diffSec=$(( $diff % 60 ))              # works fine
diffMin=$(( $diff / 60 % 60 ))        # works fine
diffHr=$(( $diff / (60 * 60) ))       # giving me problems due to the parens
testerme=$(( $diff / 3600 ))          # works fine but will use only as a work around
diffDay=$(( $diff / (60 * 60 * 24) )) # problems again
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diff=1234567
diffSec=$(( $diff % 60))         
diffMin=$(( $diff / 60 % 60))    
diffHr=$(( $diff / (60 * 60))) 
testerme=$(( $diff / 3600)) 
diffDay=$(( $diff / (60 * 60 * 24)))
echo $diffDay days $diffHr hours $diffMin min $diffSec sec

Output:

14 days 342 hours 56 min 7 sec
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The parentheses and other symbols must be escaped so that the shell doesn't interpret them. Also you need spaces around the parens.

A=`expr 100000 / \( 60 \* 60 \)`
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should really use the $() syntax –  brianadams Jan 8 at 6:25

As a completely different solution, have you ever thought about using the command line program dc (stands for desk calculator)?

It is a stack based calculator (also known as reverse polish)

diffSec=`echo '$diff 60 %p' | dc`
diffMin=`echo '$diff 60 60 /%p' | dc`
diffHr=`echo '$diff 60 60 */p' | dc`
diffDay=`echo '$diff 60 60 24 **/p' | dc`
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First of all, your parentheses are being interpreted as if part of globs, but the patterns don't seem to be terminated (since there's a space in between).[1] These will need to be escaped; the * will also require escaping to avoid being used as a glob.

Second, expr doesn't actually accept parentheses as part of one of the arguments; they need to be separate arguments.

As such, you probably want

diffHr=`expr $diff / \ (60 \* 60 \)`

Likewise,

diffHr=`expr $diff / \ (60 \* 60 \* 24 \)`

That said, bash provides the $(( )) construct as well, and it's probably a better idea to use that.

diffHr=$(( $diff/(60*60) ))
diffDay=$(( $diff/(60*60*24) ))
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