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I'd like to have a placeholder in my UITextView and I'd rather avoid complexities like dragged out methods(overloaded code) and subclassing. I just need to retain edit typing.

I'm currently using this methodology to create a placeholder in an UITextView

.h

@property (weak, nonatomic) IBOutlet UITextView *gcTextView;

.m

@synthesize gcTextView;

add this to to viewDidLoad:

self.gcTextView.text = @"placeholder text here";
self.gcTextView.textColor = [UIColor lightGrayColor];
gcTextView.layer.borderColor = [[UIColor whiteColor] CGColor];

Then use this method for editing->

- (void) textViewDidBeginEditing:(UITextView *) textView
{
    [textView setText:@""];

    self.gcTextView.textColor = [UIColor blackColor];
}

QUESTION: What will I need to add to this way of doing it to

1) add the placeholder back to the textView if edited text returns to nil or @"" I guess.

2) Not delete all the user's edited text when re-entering edit mode on the textView

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For having a placeholder functionality in UITextView, i generally do this:

[self.gcTextView setText:@"placeholder"];
[self.gcTextView setTextColor:[UIColor lightGrayColor]];
[self.gcTextView setTag:100]; //start tag with default 100

- (void) textViewShouldBeginEditing:(UITextView *) textView
{
    if(textView.tag == 100) {
        [textView setTag:200];
        [textView setText:@""];
        [textView setTextColor:[UIColor blackColor];
    }
}

- (void) textViewDidEndEditing:(UITextView *) textView
{
    //handle text that has spaces as it's content (i.e. no characters)
    NSString *strStrippedText = [textView.text stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceCharacterSet]];

    if(strStrippedText.length == 0) {
        [textView setTag:100];
        [textView setText:@"Placeholder"];
        [textView setTextColor:[UIColor lightGrayColor];
    }
}

Basically, it's all about the tag I set to it


EDIT: However...

If you use tags for other purposes then this might break something so you can safely modify the bounces property and use it as an indicator for your personal use.

[self.gcTextView setText:@"placeholder"];
[self.gcTextView setTextColor:[UIColor lightGrayColor]];
[self.gcTextView setBounces:NO]; //NO for placeholder text

- (void) textViewShouldBeginEditing:(UITextView *) textView
{
    if(textView.bounces == NO) {
        [textView setText:@""];
        [textView setTextColor:[UIColor blackColor];
        [textView setBounces:YES]; //YES for non-placeholder text
    }
}

- (void) textViewDidEndEditing:(UITextView *) textView
{
    //handle text that has spaces as it's content (i.e. no characters)
    NSString *strStrippedText = [textView.text stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceCharacterSet]];

    if(strStrippedText.length == 0) {
        [textView setText:@"Placeholder"];
        [textView setTextColor:[UIColor lightGrayColor];
        [textView setBounces:NO];
    }
}
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1  
You're missing closing brackets. –  Josue Espinosa Jan 8 '14 at 3:52
    
@JosueEspinosa : yups, thanks, fixed. –  staticVoidMan Jan 8 '14 at 3:54
    
VERY nice. I think this can also be done with booleans but this is really cool, haven't seen this –  Chisx Jan 8 '14 at 3:56
    
@WhiteHatPrince : glad you liked it :) ...tags to the rescue! –  staticVoidMan Jan 8 '14 at 3:58

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