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According to the Designing principle,"Coding to interface not to implementation".

I come up with a doubt by designing simple program.As a beginner i have this question which is given below,

 import java.util.*;

    public class HelloWorld{

         public static void main(String []args){
            Map<Integer,String> test = new HashMap<Integer,String>();
            test.put(1,"Sridhar");
            test.put(2,"Lord Balaji");
            test.put(3,"Ragavendra");
            test.put(4,"Jai Krishna");
            Set testObject = test.keySet();
            LinkedList<Integer> normal = new LinkedList<Integer>();
         //   List<Integer> interfaceImpl = new LinkedList<Integer>();
         //   interfaceImpl.addAll(testObject);
         //   System.out.println(interfaceImpl);
         //   System.out.println("The keys are:"+interfaceImpl.getFirst());
            normal.addAll(testObject);
            System.out.println(normal);
            System.out.println("The keys are:"+normal.getFirst());
         }
    }

Uncomment the lines on the above code ,which is the coding to interface List design.

But designing as per the design pattern,i got the compile error.

whether this error is violating the designing principle in java or I have misunderstood the concept.so Just give me good explanation to recover from this.

Thank You

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closed as off-topic by Narendra Pathai, Brian Roach, Ridcully, Soner Gönül, Anand Jan 8 '14 at 7:39

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Brian Roach, Ridcully, Soner Gönül, Anand
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
compilation error is because you have Maptest without spaces. Modify to Map test. Also List does not have getFirst() method, which will also throw compilation error. –  Surendran Duraisamy Jan 8 '14 at 5:58
1  
List does not have a getFirst method, this is a method of the implementation not the interface... –  MadProgrammer Jan 8 '14 at 6:03
    
I know that getFirst() is not in the interface,then why designing principles states like that ? –  JAVA Beginner Jan 8 '14 at 6:40
    
@JAVABeginner you're using the wrong interface ;) Look at the JavaDoc for LinkedList; it implements several, one of which specifies getFirst() –  Brian Roach Jan 8 '14 at 6:55
    
yeah @ brian I got cleared :) Java always rocks :) its simply the Deque interface from where the LinkedList is implementing :) –  JAVA Beginner Jan 8 '14 at 6:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The interface deque which is suppose to perform front and back insertion deletion etc. This interface have been implemented by LinkedList.

import java.util.*;

public class HelloWorld{

     public static void main(String []args){
        Map<Integer,String>test = new HashMap<Integer,String>();
        test.put(1,"Sridhar");
        test.put(2,"Lord Balaji");
        test.put(3,"Ragavendra");
        test.put(4,"Jai Krishna");
        Set testObject = test.keySet();
        LinkedList<Integer> normal = new LinkedList<Integer>();
        Deque<Integer> interfaceImpl = new LinkedList<Integer>(); //Here Design principle works
        interfaceImpl.addAll(testObject);
        System.out.println(interfaceImpl);
        System.out.println("The keys are:"+interfaceImpl.getFirst());
        normal.addAll(testObject);
        System.out.println(normal);
        System.out.println("The keys are:"+normal.getFirst());
     }
}

Now It is cleared :) thanks for all your comments

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You should specify your generic types, and check your variable names -

public static void main(String[] args) {
  Map<Integer, String> test = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
  test.put(1, "Sridhar");
  test.put(2, "Lord Balaji");
  test.put(3, "Ragavendra");
  test.put(4, "Jai Krishna");
  Set<Integer> testObject = test.keySet();
  LinkedList<Integer> normal = new LinkedList<Integer>();
  List<Integer> interfaceImpl = new ArrayList<Integer>(); // <-- Note this works too!
  interfaceImpl.addAll(testObject);
  System.out.println(interfaceImpl);
  // A list, not necessarily a LinkedList...
  System.out.println("The keys are:"
      + interfaceImpl.iterator().next());
  normal.addAll(testObject);
  System.out.println(normal);
  System.out.println("The keys are:"
      + normal.getFirst());
}

Which outputs

[1, 2, 3, 4]
The keys are:1
[1, 2, 3, 4]
The keys are:1
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LinkedList<Integer> normal = new LinkedList<Integer>(); this line only i have error cos i was typed to interface...now i come to know that list interface doesnt have that getFirst() method.Design principle is fails in this case ? –  JAVA Beginner Jan 8 '14 at 6:44
    
No. You didn't code to the interface. getting the iterator() and then calling next() will work for all List(s) (including LinkedList). Your method demonstrates the issue addressed by the pattern because it only works with LinkedList. –  Elliott Frisch Jan 8 '14 at 6:47

I have not run your code and I cannot tell you the exact mistake. When you execute something against an interface, it means that you can execute the methods defined in the interface. So, I suppose that you call some method defined the class implementing the interface which causes the error.

The getFirst method is defined in the LinkedList and not in the List interface. When you use it in the rest of your code, you depend your code in the LinkedList class which is not as generic as the List interface.

This "code against interface" principle helps you to have the rest of your code independent of (not depending on) a specific interface implementation (like LinkedList). Therefore, you should find another way of finding the first element in your list, using the methods of the List interface. You could also check this post which explains the whole idea.

Hope I helped!

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