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This question already has an answer here:

Can anyone please provide me the htaccess configurations so that I can treat my folders as subdomains.

Suppose an user will try to browser http://folder.mydomain.com and the user actually see contents of http://mydomain.com/folder.

Also, I want the URL in the browser to show http://folder.mydomain.com and not http://mydomain.com/folder.

Although I found solutions on the internet but was unable to make it work.

Thanks in advance.

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marked as duplicate by deceze, cryptic ツ, m59, aksu, SeanWM Feb 28 '14 at 13:11

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
What have you then tried so far? – TiMESPLiNTER Jan 8 '14 at 6:40

Try:

RewriteEngine On

# to handle directory slash
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www\. [NC]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^([^.]+)
RewriteCond %{DOCUMENT_ROOT}/%1%{REQUEST_URI} -d
RewriteRule ^(.+[^/])$ /$1/ [L,R=301]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www\. [NC]
RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^([^.]+)
RewriteCond %{DOCUMENT_ROOT}/%1 -d
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /%1/$1 [L]

The conditions first check that the request isn't already for an existing file or directory, then that the hostname doesn't start with a "www", then it creates a grouping for the subdomain (e.g. folder), then in the first rule, it checks that the request inside the "folder" is a directory and the request doesn't end with a trailing slash. This will redirect the request to include the trailing slash. This is because mod_dir and the DirectorySlash option will redirect requests for directories without a trailing slash, and this will expose your "folder".

The second rule has the same conditions except that it checks only that the subdomain is a folder that exists. Then it internally rewrites the request to that folder.

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