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Regarding the following code:

main()

List<int> a = new List<int>();
List<int> b = new List<int>();

a.Add(2);
a = add(a, 3);
b = add(a, 4);
b.Add(5);
a.Add(6);

function

static List<int> add(List<int> l, int x)
{
    l.Add(x);
    return l;
}

What I would like is that the result would be: a(2,3,6) and b(2,3,4,5).

In the end, both lists contain (2,3,4,5,6).

I understand that this may happens because a,b are just pointers to the start of the list. How could i achieve my desired result?

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2  
see my answer here stackoverflow.com/questions/20877596/copying-list-values/… –  Ehsan Jan 8 '14 at 9:44
    
Why do you have the add method? It looks totally pointless –  johnnycardy Jan 8 '14 at 9:45
    
Just return a different list from the one received as parameter. –  Andrei V Jan 8 '14 at 9:50
    
@johnnycardy it seems pointless in this example. but it would make my question easier understandable. This is how i could use my function: a.add(1); for (i=2;i<10;i++){b=add(a,i); do_things_with_b();}. So in the first iteration i would run the function with b(1,2), in the second iteration with b(1,3)... until b(1,10) –  Thanos Darkadakis Jan 8 '14 at 9:50
    
@ThanosDarkadakis - How about an extension method like public static IEnumerable<T> And<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T item) { foreach (var value in source) { yield return value; } yield return item; } which you could then use like var b = a.And(i); or if you really need a list: var b = a.And(i).ToList();? Would even work for var b = a.And(3); b = b.And(4); (or var b = a.And(3).And(4); for that matter) - now b would enumerate everything from a, then 3 and then 4. –  Corak Jan 8 '14 at 10:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is a complete example that does what you want:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<int> a = new List<int>();
        List<int> b = new List<int>();

        a.Add(2);
        a = add(a, 3);
        b = add(a, 4);
        b.Add(5);
        a.Add(6);

        foreach (var item in a)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item);
        }

        Console.WriteLine();

        foreach (var item in b)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(item);
        }
    }

    static List<int> add(List<int> l, int x)
    {
        List<int> result = new List<int>(l);
        result.Add(x);
        return result;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although it works, it seems overkill to create a new list every time an item is added. –  johnnycardy Jan 8 '14 at 10:03
    
@johnnycardy It works, it is simple and it is the only thing I can think of at this time for this requirement. If creating a new list every time is an issue, I'm guessing there would not be a requirement to make something work this way. –  mrzli Jan 8 '14 at 10:10

As you want two separate lists, you have to create another list in the code. If you want the method to return a new list, and get the result that you desired, you would need to create it before adding the item to it:

static List<int> add(List<int> l, int x) {
  l = new List<int>(l);
  l.Add(x);
  return l;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This solution does not meet the requirements: it adds to the a list the 4 value (see OP's example). Add x to the outputted list. –  Andrei V Jan 8 '14 at 9:52
    
will this still change a to (2,3,4,6)? –  Bolu Jan 8 '14 at 9:52
    
@AndreiV: You are right, I switched the order in the method. –  Guffa Jan 8 '14 at 10:47
    
@Bolu: Nope, I fixed it. –  Guffa Jan 8 '14 at 10:54

Here's how I would do it. Delete your add method, and include System.Linq. Then you can use the ToList() method to create a copy.

List<int> a = new List<int>();
List<int> b; //Don't instantiate - it would be overwritten anyway

a.Add(2);
a.Add(3);

b = a.ToList(); //Create a copy of 'a'
b.Add(4);
b.Add(5);

a.Add(6);
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