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Currently I have following list in my code.

private List<myClass> mylist;

Can I replace it with

private LinkedList<myClass> mylist;

?

Goal in mind is that that when size of mylist extends a certain size (lets say 10) I remove the oldest entry from list and add the newest one and so on. Apparantly LinkedList has following methods which I can use (they are not present in List)

mylist.RemoveFirst();

mylist.AddLast(..);

So my q is if I change from List to LinkedList will there be any loss of functionality? I mean other things in my code dependent on List will be affected or is it like this that what ever you are doing with List you can also do it with LInkedList ?

Secondly, or is it not necessary to change to LinkedList. what I am aiming to achieve I can do it with List ?

(I was thinking in these lines if I use List to achieve my goal

if (mylist.Count >= maxNumEntries)
{
    list.RemoveAt(0);
}

list.Add(..);

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
How can we tell this without seeing your code? –  ps06756 Jan 8 '14 at 9:53
1  
Let the compiler tell if you if you lost functionality that your code depends on. It can see all of your code, unlike us. –  Hans Passant Jan 8 '14 at 9:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My advice is that no need to change List to LinkedList. It may or may not create confusion depending on your code. Moreover, you can make these simple methods, using LINQ quite easily.
I am giving one example of such method below: -

You can make custom RemoveFirst method:-

    List<T> RemoveFirst(List<T> paramList)
    {
       List<T> tempList = paramList.Skip(1).ToList() ;
       return tempList ;
    }  

and similarly you can make other methods to manipulate your List<T>.

Usage

    List<int> myList = new List<int> () ; 
    // add some items to list 
    // now remove the first item. 
     myList = RemoveFirst(myList) ; 

Selection of DataStructure
List<T> and LinkedList<T> are different not only in the custom methods they offer, but also in the implementation.
for eg
LinkedList<T> provides slower access to elements, as compared to List<T>.
I am sure there can be many advantages in favor of LinkedList<T> also, but good programmers select data structure on the basis of properties they offer.
In your case, a Circular queue can also be useful. So please select the data-structure not on the basis of the methods they offer, but on the properties you think will be important for your application.

share|improve this answer
    
aha ! thanks..so for removing first( oldest) entry I just use this method. and for adding newest i just use the default Add method ? –  user1903439 Jan 8 '14 at 9:59
    
Yes you can use this method. –  ps06756 Jan 8 '14 at 10:00
    
great ! and yes i agree with our advice to stick to List ! –  user1903439 Jan 8 '14 at 10:01
    
You can accept the answer, if it helped you –  ps06756 Jan 8 '14 at 10:06
    
aha good to know. thanks for this additions information –  user1903439 Jan 8 '14 at 10:19

You seem to want a circular buffer (also known as a ring buffer).

You might be best just writing a custom class to implement it, such as this:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace Demo
{
    public class CircularBuffer<T>: IEnumerable<T>
    {
        /// <summary>Constructor.</summary>
        /// <param name="capacity">The maximum capacity of the buffer.</param>

        public CircularBuffer(int capacity)
        {
            // The reason for this +1 is to simplify the logic - we can use "front == back" to indicate an empty buffer.

            _buffer = new T[capacity+1];
        }

        /// <summary>The buffer capacity.</summary>

        public int Capacity
        {
            get
            {
                return _buffer.Length - 1;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>The number of elements currently stored in the buffer.</summary>

        public int Count
        {
            get
            {
                int result = _back - _front;

                if (result < 0)
                    result += _buffer.Length;

                return result;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>Is the buffer empty?</summary>

        public bool IsEmpty
        {
            get
            {
                return this.Count == 0;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>Is the buffer full? (i.e. has it reached its capacity?)</summary>

        public bool IsFull
        {
            get
            {
                return nextSlot(_back) == _front;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>Empties the buffer.</summary>

        public void Empty()
        {
            _front = _back = 0;
            Array.Clear(_buffer, 0, _buffer.Length); // Destroy any old references so they can be GCed.
        }

        /// <summary>Add an element to the buffer, overwriting the oldest element if the buffer is full.</summary>
        /// <param name="newItem">The element to add.</param>

        public void Add(T newItem)
        {
            _buffer[_back] = newItem;
            _back = nextSlot(_back);

            if (_back == _front) // Buffer is full?
            {
                _front = nextSlot(_front); // Bump the front, overwriting the current front.
                _buffer[_back] = default(T); // Remove the old front value.
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The typesafe enumerator. Elements are returned in oldest to newest order.
        /// This is not threadsafe, so if you are enumerating the buffer while another thread is changing it you will run
        /// into threading problems. Therefore you must use your own locking scheme to avoid the problem.
        /// </summary>

        public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
        {
            for (int i = _front; i != _back; i = nextSlot(i))
                yield return _buffer[i];
        }

        /// <summary>The non-typesafe enumerator.</summary>

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return GetEnumerator(); // Implement in terms of the typesafe enumerator.
        }

        /// <summary>Calculates the index of the slot following the specified one, wrapping if necessary.</summary>

        private int nextSlot(int slot)
        {
            return (slot + 1) % _buffer.Length;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// The index of the element at the front of the buffer. 
        /// If this equals _back, the buffer is empty.
        /// </summary>

        private int _front;

        /// <summary>
        /// The index of the first element BEYOND the last used element of the buffer. 
        /// Therefore this indicates where the next added element will go.
        /// </summary>

        private int _back;

        /// <summary>The underlying buffer. This has a length one greater than the actual capacity.</summary>

        private readonly T[] _buffer;
    }

    internal class Program
    {
        private void run()
        {
            CircularBuffer<int> buffer = new CircularBuffer<int>(10);

            for (int i = 0; i < 20; ++i)
                buffer.Add(i);

            foreach (int n in buffer)
                Console.WriteLine(n);  // Prints 10..19
        }

        private static void Main()
        {
            new Program().run();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot for the reply mate ! –  user1903439 Jan 8 '14 at 10:00

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