Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following is the situation: I am trying to implement a solution which works with N dimensional arrays, something like the following code would make possible (not a real programming language yet):

int a[10,14,56]

would create a 3 dimensional array (ie: a Cuboid), or:

int a[10,20]

would obviously create a matrix.

In order to be able to represent also the data, I have decided to create a "flat" memory area for the elements. So, for the 3 dimensional vector I allocate 10 * 14 * 56 ints and for the second I allocate 10 * 20 ints.

Now, the problem comes: for retrieving an element at a given index the solution is self explaining for 1 dimensional arrays, and for the two dimensional arrays (value at (i, j) where i counts rows and j counts columns in array N x M where N is row count and M is column count) I cooked up the formula:

array[N, M] -> flat_memory [N * M]
flat_index(i,j) = M * i + j

and for the 3 dimensional arrays I came up with:

array[N, M, L] -> flat_memory[N * M * L]
flat_index(i, j, k) = L * i + M * j + k

but this feels bad ... and it seems I cannot get the step to the generalization either :( So here I turn to the community: What is the flaw in my logic/calculations? Are there any algorithms out there for this kind of problem?

share|improve this question
    
Possible duplicate of setting-pointer-to-arbitrary-dimension-array –  Jarod42 Jan 8 '14 at 11:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think a generalization way as following

array[N, M, K] -> flat_memory[N * M * K]

flat_index(i, j, k) = (M*N) * i + M * j + k

array[N, M, K, L] -> flat_memory[N * M * K * L]

flat_index(i, j, k, l) = (M*N*K) * i + (M*N) * j + M* k + l

share|improve this answer

Try writing down a few values, with the desired index. So, for N = 1, M = 2, L = 3, for example:

i  j  k  index
0  0  0  0
0  0  1  1
0  0  2  2
0  1  0  3
0  1  1  4
0  1  2  5
1  0  0  6
...

Now you can just observe that for each increase of i, the index should increase by 6, which is M*L. And for each increase of j, the index should increase by 3, which is L.

(And more generally, you need to multiply some dimension's index by all less significant dimensions' indices)

So we have:

array[N, M, L] -> flat_memory[N * M * L]
flat_index(i, j, k) = M * L * i + L * j + k

This is by no means the only valid way to do this. You can rearrange the order as you see fit, changing the multiplicands appropriately, so these are all valid ways to flatten it:

flat_index(i, j, k) = M * L * i + M * k + j

flat_index(i, j, k) = N * L * j + L * i + k
flat_index(i, j, k) = N * L * j + N * k + i

flat_index(i, j, k) = M * N * k + M * i + j
flat_index(i, j, k) = M * N * k + N * j + i
share|improve this answer

You may be interested in the following code which allow you to use any "dynamic" dimension:

#include <cassert>
#include <cstddef>

#include <vector>

template<typename T>
class MultiArray
{
public:
    explicit MultiArray(const std::vector<size_t>& dimensions) :
        dimensions(dimensions),
        values(computeTotalSize(dimensions))
    {
        assert(!dimensions.empty());
        assert(!values.empty());
    }

    const T& get(const std::vector<size_t>& indexes) const
    {
        return values[computeIndex(indexes)];
    }
    T& get(const std::vector<size_t>& indexes)
    {
        return values[computeIndex(indexes)];
    }

    size_t computeIndex(const std::vector<size_t>& indexes) const
    {
        assert(indexes.size() == dimensions.size());

        size_t index = 0;
        size_t mul = 1;

        for (size_t i = 0; i != dimensions.size(); ++i) {
            assert(indexes[i] < dimensions[i]);
            index += indexes[i] * mul;
            mul *= dimensions[i];
        }
        assert(index < values.size());
        return index;
    }

    std::vector<size_t> computeIndexes(size_t index) const
    {
        assert(index < values.size());

        std::vector<size_t> res(dimensions.size());

        size_t mul = values.size();
        for (size_t i = dimensions.size(); i != 0; --i) {
            mul /= dimensions[i - 1];
            res[i - 1] = index / mul;
            assert(res[i - 1] < dimensions[i - 1]);
            index -= res[i - 1] * mul;
        }
        return res;
    }

private:
    size_t computeTotalSize(const std::vector<size_t>& dimensions) const
    {
        size_t totalSize = 1;

        for (auto i : dimensions) {
            totalSize *= i;
        }
        return totalSize;
    }

private:
    std::vector<size_t> dimensions;
    std::vector<T> values;
};

Let's test it:

int main()
{
    MultiArray<int> m({3, 2, 4});

    m.get({0, 0, 3}) = 42;
    m.get({2, 1, 3}) = 42;

    for (size_t i = 0; i != 24; ++i) {
        assert(m.computeIndex(m.computeIndexes(i)) == i);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Obviously for a 1-dimensional array you just need one index to address all elements:

array[N] -> flat_memory[N] <br />
flat_index(i) = i

If you add another dimension it becomes (as you stated correctly):

array[N, M] -> flat_memory[N * M]<br />
flat_index(i, j) = M * i + j

And a third:

array[N, M, K] -> flat_memory[N * M * L]<br />
flat_index(i, j, k) = (M * i + j) * N + k

I think you can see the pattern more clearly now. For every new dimension multiply the size of the last and add the new index.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.